Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Green Chile Stew with Pork


Meat and potatoes, New Mexico style

Green Chile Stew with Pork (aka Chile Verde) is one of the best-known dishes in New Mexico. And while it’s a meat-heavy dish, the flavor is all about the chilies.

Which makes sense, because green chilies—New Mexico’s largest agricultural crop—feature superb quality and flavor.

More about chilies later. Right now, all you really need to know is this: When the weather turns cold, nothing heats you up better than a steaming bowl of Green Chile Stew with Pork.



Recipe: Green Chile Stew with Pork

Some of the world’s best green chilies are grown in New Mexico’s Hatch Valley (which runs along the Rio Grande north from the town of Hatch). Hatch chilies are named after the town, BTW; they’re not a separate variety of chile. They are essentially the same variety as Anaheim chile peppers, but the New Mexico chilies have been developed to be hotter and more flavorful than the Anaheims we buy in the supermarket.

The season for fresh Hatch chilies is late summer—so it’s unlikely you’ll be able to find fresh ones in your supermarket now. In fact, even during the season, many supermarkets outside the Southwest never carry fresh Hatch chilies. But you can buy frozen Hatch chilies from several mail-order sources in New Mexico (Google is your friend here).

For this recipe, we used frozen roasted and peeled Hatch chilies that came from the Hatch Chile Store. Disclosure: They sent us a complimentary 5-pound box of frozen chilies. We almost never accept freebies, but Hatch chilies are something we’ve used and loved for years, so we couldn’t resist the offer.

If you can’t find Hatch chilies, worry not. Anaheims have good flavor, and they’re available in every supermarket, so you can substitute those. Anaheims are fairly mild, though, so you may want to use more than our recipe specifies. You might also want to add extra jalapeño peppers. If you prefer not to use fresh or frozen chilies, you can substitute canned green chilies.

This recipe is adapted from one we found in Jeff Smith’s The Frugal Gourmet Cooks American. Another terrific recipe can be found at MJ’s Kitchen. (Check out her whole blog while you’re there—she does good stuff.)

Prep time for this recipe is about half an hour. Cooking time adds another 2 hours or more (most of it unattended).

This recipe serves about 8, and leftovers freeze well.

Ingredients
  • ~9 ounces fresh or frozen Hatch green chilies that are medium heat (about 6 to 8 whole chilies, but see Notes, because you may want to vary the amount; if you can’t find Hatch green chilies, just substitute whatever green chilies you can find—such as Anaheims, poblanos, or chilacas; you can also substitute canned green chilies—see Notes)
  • ~2 pounds boneless pork, cut into ½-inch pieces (pork butt or pork steaks work well; can substitute another meat—see Notes)
  • ~½ teaspoon Kosher salt for seasoning the meat (or to taste; see Notes)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil or rendered bacon fat
  • ~½ cup chicken stock or water for deglazing pan (optional; see Step 2 of the stew procedure)
  • ~1 cup chopped onion (1 large; we prefer yellow onions in this dish)
  • additional tablespoon of olive oil or rendered bacon fat for cooking the onions
  • additional ~½ teaspoon Kosher salt for seasoning the onions
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 to 2 jalapeño peppers (optional, and not traditional, but tasty)
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 2 teaspoons coriander
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons oregano
  • 1 15-ounce can diced tomato (we sometimes double this)
  • additional chicken stock (enough to just cover the mixture while cooking—about 4 cups; may substitute water)
  • additional Kosher salt to taste (if needed)
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste (if needed)
  • 1 pound potatoes (optional but traditional; white potatoes are typical, but sweet potatoes also work well—see Notes)
  • 2 cups frozen sweet corn (optional, but tasty)
  • jalapeño pepper slices or chopped parsley for garnish (optional)

Procedure

Note: If you’re using fresh chilies, you’ll get the best results if you roast them first—then skin, stem, and deseed them. If you’re using frozen or canned chilies, you can skip this part of the recipe. (Frozen and canned chilies will already be roasted and peeled.)

For the roasted fresh green chilies:
  1. Wash the green chilies and spread them out on a broiler pan (preferably one with a wire rack). 
  2. Place them under the broiler and heat until the chile skins begin to blister and turn black. Turn the chilies and repeat until all sides are blistered.
  3. Place the roasted chilies in a bowl and cover with a plate or plastic wrap. Allow them to steam for 15 minutes or so.
  4. Chilies are spicy and can burn your skin, so wear kitchen gloves while doing this step: Using your hands, rub the skin of each chile until it comes off. This usually is quite easy to do, but if necessary you can use a paring knife to help with recalcitrant parts.
  5. Next, cut off the stem end of each chile (just below the stem). Slit each chile open lengthwise and (wearing gloves) remove the seeds and cut off the white pith (these parts contain much of the chile “heat” without contributing much flavor). It’s sometimes easier to deseed chilies by rinsing them under running water—the seeds usually just wash away.
  6. Dice the roasted chilies into pieces about ½ inch square, then set them aside until Step 7 of the stew procedure. If you’ve prepared more chilies than you need for this dish, they freeze well. Just portion them into plastic bags and freeze.
For the stew:
  1. If you’re using frozen chilies (which usually arrive roasted and peeled), thaw them; if necessary, stem and seed them (see Step 4 of the roasted chile procedure above). Chop the chilies into pieces about 1/2 inch square. If using canned chilies, open the can(s). Set the chilies aside until Step 7 below.
  2. Now prepare the meat: Pat the meat dry with paper towels, then cut it into chunks of about ½ inch. Salt the meat to season it. Heat a frying pan (cast iron is ideal) and add enough oil or rendered bacon fat to just cover the bottom of the pan. Add the chunks of meat to the pan and brown them thoroughly on all sides (this will takes 5 minutes or a bit less—smaller pieces brown more quickly). Don’t overcrowd the pan, since the meat won’t brown well if you do. You will probably need to brown the meat in two or more batches, adding more fat to the pan between batches if necessary. When each batch of meat is fully browned, remove the chunks of meat to a plate covered with paper towels (so the grease can drain). When all the meat is browned, there usually will be a slight crust left on the bottom of the pan. If it’s not burnt, deglaze the pan: Use a paper towel to mop out any excess grease. Then put the frying pan on medium stovetop heat and add about ½ cup chicken stock or water. Using a spatula, scrape the bottom of the pan to loosen the crusty residue (it has a lot of flavor). Pour the crusty mixture into a container and set aside until Step 8 below.
  3. While the meat is browning, peel and dice the onions. Warm a large cooking pot or Dutch oven—a 4-quart size is good—over medium heat (this is what you’ll be using to cook the stew). When the Dutch oven is warm, add a tablespoon of olive oil or rendered bacon fat and allow it to heat (it will shimmer when it’s hot). Then add the diced onions, season them with salt, and cook until the onions are just on the verge of browning (5 to 8 minutes). While the onions are cooking, move on to Steps 4 and 5.
  4. Peel the garlic and mince it finely (or slice it thinly).
  5. Wash the jalapeño peppers (if using) and cut them lengthwise (you may want to wear kitchen gloves while doing this step). Use a teaspoon to scoop out the ribs and seeds (be careful, the oil on these is hot; keep fingers away from your eyes). Chop the peppers into very small dice (or use a mini food processor). Place the peppers in a bowl until you’re ready to use them, then wash your hands with soap and water to remove the hot jalapeño oil from your skin (if you didn’t wear gloves). You may want to reserve a slice or two of jalapeño for garnish.
  6. When the onions are on the verge of browning, add the chopped garlic and jalapeño to the onions and cook them for a minute or two.
  7. Add the browned meat to the Dutch oven or cooking pot that contains the onion mixture. Add the green chilies (from Step 5 of the chile roasting procedure or Step 1 of this procedure). Add the cumin, coriander, oregano, and diced tomatoes. Stir the mixture and allow it to simmer for a few minutes.
  8. Add the chicken broth and the deglazing liquid from Step 2 of this procedure (if using). Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce it to a simmer.
  9. Set a kitchen timer for 30 minutes. Allow the stew to simmer until the timer goes off, then taste the sauce. Add salt and pepper if necessary. If you want a spicier stew, you can add a bit of hot sauce or additional green chilies.
  10. Cook the stew at a simmer for another hour. While the stew is simmering, wash the potatoes, peel them, and cut them into chunks of ½ inch or so.
  11. After the stew has been simmering for 1½ hours total, add the potato chunks to the cooking pot. Cook for another 30 to 40 minutes (until the potatoes are tender).
  12. About 10 minutes before serving, add frozen corn to the dish. Cook until the corn is tender.
  13. When you’re ready to serve, dish up the stew and garnish with jalapeño pepper slices or chopped parsley, if desired.

Notes
  • How many green chilies should you use? It depends on how spicy you like your food—and how hot the chilies are. Green chilies range from mild to quite hot (they’re usually labeled). If you’re unsure, you might want to take a tiny bite of a chile after roasting to see how hot it is.
  • Use mild chilies if you’re averse to chile heat. As noted above, Anaheim chilies are quite mild, so use them if you’re worried about too much heat.
  • If the chilies you have aren’t hot enough for your taste, use more than the recipe specifies. You can always start with fewer, then add more in Step 9 of the stew procedure if you think the dish needs more flavor.
  • Canned green chilies work fine in this recipe. You can usually find canned chilies in the Mexican food section at your supermarket. The cans come in various sizes, though 4-ounce containers are very common. Canned chilies usually are pretty wimpy heatwise, so we suggest starting with 8 ounces. After the stew has cooked for a bit, you can taste it to gauge the heat. If the flavor isn’t bold enough for you, add some more canned green chilies.
  • Jalapeño peppers aren’t traditional in this dish, but we add them for extra flavor (and a touch of extra heat). Plus they make a great garnish.
  • If you find the stew isn’t as spicy hot as you’d like, you can always add hot sauce or cayenne pepper to liven it up.
  • If the stew turns out to be too hot for your taste, we suggest adding more potatoes (and maybe additional tomato and extra chicken stock) to tame it a bit.
  • BTW, many green chile stew recipes don’t include tomato. But we like it, so we always add it.
  • White (boiling) potatoes are traditional for this dish. But sweet potatoes work wonderfully too. We often use half white potatoes and half sweet potatoes (this post includes pictures of both this variation and the 100% white-potato version).
  • Green chile stew recipes often omit corn. We like its flavor and color, though, so we always include it. Besides, green chilies and corn are a wonderful combo.
  • Some recipes for green chile stew don’t call for browning the meat. But browning gives better flavor, so we always brown.
  • Although pork is traditional in this dish, you can substitute beef, lamb, or whatever (MJ’s recipe uses beef).
  • Kosher salt is more coarse than regular table salt, so it’s less salty by volume. If you’re substituting table salt for Kosher, always use less—about half as much. If the dish isn’t salty enough for your taste, you can always add more later.
  • Many recipes for this dish don’t include cumin. In fact, some recipes don’t include any spices or herbs—just salt and pepper. We like spice, so we add cumin, coriander, and oregano. But suit your own taste.

Have Stomachs, Will Travel

“Love this,” said Mrs. Kitchen Riffs, dipping a spoon into her bowl of Green Chile Stew with Pork.

“Those Hatch chilies are hard to beat,” I said.

“We really should travel to New Mexico one of these days,” said Mrs K R. “And experience eating these great chilies at the source.”

“We could go to the Hatch Chile Festival next year,” I said. “They hold it around late August or early September.”

“Hey, road trip!” said Mrs K R.

“Sounds like fun!” I agreed. “And we can bring back a case or two of chilies.”

“Yup, and it would be the perfect time to go,” said Mrs K R. “Because the Santa Fe Opera runs through the end of August.”

“Right, I should have realized you’d know the opera schedule by heart,” I said.

“We could hit Santa Fe first and catch a few operas, then head to Hatch for chilies,” said Mrs K R. “Why, we could have weeks of fun in New Mexico!”

This might turn into an expensive bowl of stew.

You may also enjoy reading about:
Pulled Pork and Green Chile Chili
Meat and Potatoes Chili
Sweet Potato Chili with Black Beans
Hungarian Beef Paprika Stew
Boeuf Bourguignon
Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili
Chicken and Andouille Sausage Gumbo
Or check out the index for more recipes

126 comments:

~ Nee ~ said...

Hi John , I can almost taste and smell this stew , like you I like using spice to a lot of my dishes , it gives them more zing . I also like the idea you are using the other white meat ... it works as good and in some dishes better than beef . I am pinning John and thanks for sharing , Hello to Mrs. K R :) ~Nee~

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Nee, the other white meat really works so well in this! Although beef is great, too. Thanks for the comment.

Holly | Beyond kimchee said...

Chili sounds just perfect now since we have a rainy day here in Buenos Aires. I heard about the chili made with pork is quite delicious but I've never tried myself. Your chili looks scrumptious and satisfying. All you need is some warm cornbread and honey butter, my stomach would be so happy!

Dan from Platter Talk said...

We love this original and comforting green chilie stew; perfect for fall or in my opinion, any season. Nicely done!

Hannah Cordes said...

This sounds fantastic, John, and perfect for dinner. We had our first snowflakes yesterday and it is definitely stew season. I freeze batches of Hatch chilies every year since we just love them. Hopefully you can do a road trip to New Mexico - going to the festival sounds fun and delicious!

Barb | Creative Culinary said...

A recipe after my own heart; I LOVE Hatch Chiles! And pork. And something warm. Winner winner right? :)

Dottie said...

Hi John,
This recipe looks really good! It is a perfect meal for a chilly or cold night. I always liked chili, but my family and myself are not into that much heat, I may have to cut back on the spices and the chiles. I like that you used the pork, which is a fabulous substitution for beef. I love your instructions on this meal, you go into such details which is terrific. Plus Mrs. Kitchen Riffs, is so funny...Love your blog, you always have something so interesting! Thanks for sharing..Have a wonderful day!
Dottie :)

Juliana said...

Wow John, this stew looks so good...I love the spiciness (hot) and all the spices in it...it is sure a very comforting dish...I do not cook much with pork, and this recipe is such an inspiration.
Have a wonderful week :)

Kiran @ KiranTarun.com said...

The most comforting stew! Yum!!

Cheri Savory Spoon said...

Hi John, I can only imagine what your kitchen must smell like while preparing this lovely pork stew. Never had a legendary hatch chili before, but it's on the list. Another great post!

~~louise~~ said...

Hi John!
Thanks for the heads up about Hatch Chilies. How ironic that I have my New Mexico souvenir tee shirt on today. My daughter lived there for a couple of years and boy oh boy did I stuff myself with all things hot and chili, lol...This recipe sounds fantastic! I'll be saving it too because, I'm having company next weekend and they all love spicy and hot! I'll be using Pork and Sweet Potatoes and perhaps a bit of Trader Joe's roasted corn!

Thanks so much for sharing, John...

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Holly, isn't this a nice dish? And cornbread (or tortillas) would be a great side! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Dan, we do indeed eat this in any season. Frequently in September, when fresh Hatch chilies are available. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Hannah, at some point I'm sure we'll do that road trip -- with all the great food, scenery, and activities, it's irresistible! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Barb, I've met very few people who don't love Hatch chilies! They're so good, aren't they? Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Dottie, if heat isn't your thing, do cut back on the chilies. Or try mild Hatch or regular Anaheim -- they're usually not very spicy hot. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Juliana, isn't this a nice dish? Spicy and delish -- my favorite combo! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Kiran, isn't this comforting? And really good stuff. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Cheri, the aroma in the kitchen was wonderful! Made us hungry. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Louise, pork and sweet potatoes just work so well together, don't they? Thanks for the comment.

Madonna/aka/Ms Lemon of Make Mine Lemon said...

I am waiting for it to get cooler here to make these warm weather dishes. Your green chili stew sounds delicious. I love sweet potato and pork and the chiles takes it over the top.

Sippity Sup said...

I'm so glad to see that info about Hatch being a terroir rather than a varietal. I've always suspected that. GREG

Asmita said...

Such a satisfying meal.. especially during this time of the year!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Madonna, this really is a delish dish! And although I'll eat it in warmer weather, it's really perfect for when it gets cold. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Greg, Hatch chilies are a great example of how terroir (and selective plant breeding to emphasis certain qualities -- like spicy hotness) really make a difference. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Asmita, this really is a satisfying dish! We had leftovers again last night. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Carolyn Jung said...

Perfect dish to curl up with while I watch the Giants win the series. Or conversely, cry with if they lose. LOL

Maureen | Orgasmic Chef said...

I want to go to the Hatch Chile Festival too! Not before I make this delicious stew. I agree about MJs blog. My tongue stings sometimes when I visit her blog but everything is so good!

GiGi Eats Celebrities said...

Not a pork girl, however, I would just sub in some beef or venison and still enjoy the same delicious flavors! :)

Catalina @ Shades of Pink said...

I like all the chunky vegetables, and the big pieces of pork, looks like a very satisfying and flavorful stew.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Carolyn, this is definitely comfort food both ways. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Maureen, maybe we can all meet there? :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi GiGi, beef would be awesome! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Catalina, it really is a great stew! Tons of flavor -- what I like. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Denise Browning@From Brazil To You said...

I love pork... I will have to try such a comforting and flavorful stew.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Denise, pork works so well in a dish like this! And I can never rest chilies. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Nami | Just One Cookbook said...

I became quite familiar with chiles thanks to MJ. :) And my husband will love EXTRA spicy and my kids and I probably need Anaheim chilies. The stew looks amazing... Love the bite size chunky ingredients in the stew!

Marcela said...

Wow! This dish is a dream! I love that you added jalapeno! This must be really spicy and delicious stew!:) I can't wait to give it a try!

Choc Chip Uru @ Go Bake Yourself said...

What a warming stew, the pork looks so succulent :D
Need to not be a vegetarian I swear! :P

Cheers
Choc Chip Uru

Anonymous said...

an amazing,flavor loaded and spicy stew this is....love the chunks of texture and color it has...makes such an important thing for the perfect supper....beautiful,warm and zingy stew,thanks so much :-)

Sage Trifle said...

This stew looks fantastic. My husband would be so happy if I made this; he LOVES Hatch chilies. After a warm and beautiful autumn, stew season is coming our way this weekend. Our first freezing temperatures and maybe even snow are predicted. Thanks for a great recipe. --Rocquie

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Nami, a lot of kids don't like spicy -- it's one of those tastes that takes time to develop, I think. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Marcela, jalapeño adds just a little bit extra zing in this dish. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Uru, I'll bet there's a good recipe for veggie green chile stew out there! Although the pork is really tempting, I must admit. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Kumar, zingy is my middle name. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Rocquie, we're supposed to get our first freezing temperatures this weekend too. We'll see if that actually happens -- weather here is crazy! Thanks for the comment.

ray said...

John, this stew is perfect for the cooling weather we are having (finally). I like those chunky meat and vegetables in that bowl -- it looks so delicious and hearty. Thank you, John.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Ray, the weather finally is getting truly chilly here -- we turned on our heat for the first time this season today! Although we're always late to do this -- we like cool temperature. And sweaters. And this stew keeps us awfully warm! Thanks for the comment.

Pam said...

It looks comforting and delicious!

Everyday Maven said...

Yum! I would LOVE a bowl of this for lunch today!!

All That I'm Eating said...

This sounds great, love the chunky veg.

Carol at Wild Goose Tea said...

I love pork that has been cooked for a long time. It seems to really absorb and blend with the other flavors in the pot. Different kinds of chilies is a weak link in my culinary knowledge.
So it's nice when I have my hand held like in this post.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Pam, it is, it is! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Alyssa, this make a great lunch or dinner! And we still have just a little left in the freezer. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Caroline, I love food that has texture -- so satisfying. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Carol, I agree that long-cooked pork really has a lot of flavor going for it. Chilies are fun -- definitely worth learning about. Thanks for the comment.

Liz Berg said...

I don't know why I never think of stewing pork, but your green chile version looks amazing! What a terrific mix of flavors!

Gourmet Getaways said...

Colourful and flavourful! I love the ingredients that you put here as there is a balance amongst each other. Plus tender pork in a tasty set! Mmmm...

Gourmet Getaways

mjskit said...

Great Green Chile Stew John and great information on chile and how to make a good stew! I never would have thought to use sweet potatoes in this stew, but why not. I love adding green chile to sweet potatoes so this makes sense. It also adds some color to an otherwise 'just green' stew. :) Great post! Thanks so much for the link and nice comment!

Dawn Yucuis said...

This stew sounds wonderful. I love that you used pork this is dish. Thanks for sharing.

Abbe@ThisisHowICook said...

Green chilies are one of faves. Your stew sounds great John. I do think though that Mrs KR has it right. The Opera is so much fun. Fall is my absolute favorite time in New Mexico.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Liz, I know -- we usually stew beef. But stewed pork is so tasty! Thanks for comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Julie, isn't this a nice dish? Just lovely flavor. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi MJ, I really doubt if mine is anywhere near as good as yours! You're the Goddess of Green Chilies. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Dawn, pork is so tasty in a dish like this! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Abbe, I don't know if we'll go next year, but we're pretty serious about a NM trip! Gotta feed those stomachs, you know. And Mrs KR's opera addiction. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Amy (Savory Moments) said...

What a flavorful bowl of stew! This looks so delicious and perfect for a cool evening. We love all kinds of chiles, so I know we'd enjoy this.

Anonymous said...

Damn delicious!!!

Shweta Agrawal said...

totally love the colour and texture:)
Beautiful:)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Amy, it's going to be quite chilly here this evening, so this would be perfect! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Dedy, you've got that right! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Shweta, isn't this nice? Such a great dish! Thanks for the comment.

Bill said...

I'm much prefer pork than beef in a stew and your version looks so delicious, John! I've been reading a lot about hatch chilies but I've never had any. I might need to order some and see what everyone is talking about. This recipe is a real winner. Great post!

Lea Ann (Cooking On The Ranch) said...

I love green chile stew and make it a lot. What I really like about your version is those big chunks. My kind of stew. Anaheim's are always a good substitute, but on rare occasion when I don't have Hatch in my freezer I use Poblano. Really nice flavor and usually reliable heat. Every once in awhile you'll get a feisty one.

Brooks said...

John, I always appreciate the details you share regarding chiles. And this dish...spot on, good man. Happy Halloween to you and Mrs. K R!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Bill, it's definitely worth it to track down some Hatch chilies! Their flavor is wonderful. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Lea Ann, I like a stew with texture! I agree on the Poblano peppers, but they're not as universally available as Anaheims. But they have good flavor. Thanks for hte comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Brooks, I do enjoy a dish full of chilies, I must admit! Thanks for the comment, and Happy Halloween!

Lizzy (Good Things) said...

John, this sounds so delicious.... love stewing pork, my mother cooked with it often!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Lizzy, pork stews so well, doesn't it? And this stew is superb! Thanks for the comment.

Amelia said...

Hi John, This stews pork look really good, very appetizing dish. With all the spices I'm sure it smell and taste heavenly. Thanks for sharing you recipe.

Have a great weekend, regards. Happy Halloween.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Amelia, this really is a nice, tasty dish! Love the chile flavor! Thanks for the comment.

Hotly Spiced said...

I do love a chile stew and like you, I always add tomatoes. It's been 104F here today and very sticky so I didn't make a stew but I did make a Thai beef salad for dinner that was refreshing but probably had the same heat as your stew. Thank you so much John for your kind, generous and supportive comment on my blog - it made my week! xx

Ansh said...

The temperatures are finally dropping here in Colorado. Not that I mind a nice warm fall, but chile just tastes better with a nip in the air. Fantastic post. And yes you should come visit the Hatch Chile fest and then make plans to visit all you Colorado friends.. we are just 'cross the border!!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Charlie, 104 F! That's hot! And you haven't even gotten to summer weather. Your Thai beef salad sounds wonderful. Thanks for the comment!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Ansh, we haven't been to Colorado in years! Decades! I agree, we should plan a trip. Anyway, I'll eat this dish any time of the year, but I agree it's much better when the weather is chilly. Thanks for the comment.

Chris Scheuer said...

It's not only cold here, it's rainy and blustery - perfect for a bowl of this delicious looking soup. I did make a pot of pozole recently. It seems somewhat similar.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Chris, this really is rather similar to pozole -- both great dishes! And this does sound perfect for the nasty weather you're experiencing! Thanks for the comment.

Mother Rimmy said...

I'm a fan of stew recipes. They are so versatile. You can put almost any meat and veggie in the pot, and as you say, they freeze well too.

Beth said...

I would happily use any excuse for a road trip! (And if you make it to Santa Fe, I have a great tapas restaurant to recommend.) Great stew recipe.

Shashi Charles said...

You know, up until I read your post today, I thought Hatch Chilies were a variety of chilies - thanks so much for clarifying that! I don't think I've ever had Green Chile Stew with Pork - this looks so hearty!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Kristi, I've never met a stew I didn't like! But any stew with green chilies is magic, if you ask me. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Beth, road trips are good, aren't they? And one time or another we'll definitely be making it to Santa Fe, so I'll be in touch! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Shashi, I used to think Hatch chilies were a variety too! But whatever they are, they're awfully good! Thanks for the comment.

Rosa's Yummy Yums said...

So tasty! This is a scrumptious stew.

Cheers,

Rosa

Debra Eliotseats said...

Just picked the last of our green chilis before the freeze. Must use them so thanks for the recipe. You must, must, just take Mrs. KR to Santa Fe!!!!!!!

Pamela @ Brooklyn Farm Girl said...

I can never say no to a stew that has chilies in it! This hits all the right taste points, especially on comfort!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Rosa, scrumptious is the perfect word to describe this! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Debra, Santa Fe definitely is a trip we'll be making at some point! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Pamela, chilies are my friend, too! And I'll never say no to them. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Raymund said...

I love stews like this, specially with chillies definitely it will be a hit in our place

Ashley @ Wishes and Dishes said...

This is my husband's kind of meal right here!! Delicious!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Raymund, chilies make any dish better! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Ashley, you'll have to make it for him! :D Thanks for the comment.

Pat said...

Green Chili Stew, I love everything about this dish and the photos have me drooling. We don't have Hatch chilies but the Poblano chilies are supposed to be similar. Thanks for sharing :)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Pat, Poblano chilies have good flavor -- definitely a tasty substitution. Thanks for the comment.

Anonymous said...

Now, this is what all other chillis aspire to be, John. Such a great combination of flavors and textures, perfect for this time of year. I have to do some searching to see if canned green chilies are available here. I'm sure they are. I just have to find them. Time for a change in my chili eating ways, I'd say. Thanks for the nudge in the right direction.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi John, this really does have terrific flavor -- definitely worth trying at some point. And you shouldn't have problems finding canned green chilies in Chicago -- such a great food town! Thanks for the comment.

Lail | With A Spin said...

We don't eat pork, but I would love to try this with beef. A great combination of flavors and textures. Great stuff.

Donalyn@TheCreeksideCook said...

This is like the perfect fall dish, John - so warm and inviting. Pork makes an amazing stew!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Lail, this is wonderful with beef! Pork is the classic, and my first choice; but beef works really, really well in this dish. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Donalyn, this really is warm and inviting! Just a wonderful dish. Thanks for the comment.

Danielle Burrus said...

I made this for dinner last week, John, when the twins were home from grad school. We all loved it and I will make it again soon. Thanks!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Danielle, glad you enjoyed it! And thanks for letting me know you made it. :-)

Linda said...

This looks delicious...and heartwarming!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Linda, it is, it is! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Helene Dsouza said...

This is exactly the kind of food I love to savor when the weather is cold outside. I just wished I could get pork that easily here. I never thought of pork and chili in a stew John, I know my husband would love it for sure! He goes crazy for stews and soups. :)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Helene, pork works really well with chilies! I've had a few Indian dishes that feature pork, but not many. Thanks for the comment.

Suzanne Perazzini said...

A lot of good food comes out of Mexico. We are so limited here in what chillies we can find. Most are small, long and red. I would also add in the tomatoes - they add something to most savoury dishes

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Suzanne, this type of green chile isn't as hot as the small red ones. The flavor is a bit different, too, although you could make a similar dish using those. Thanks for the comment.

Dana @ Simply Romanesco said...

This stew is so delicious and comforting! Perfect for the cold weather we're experiencing. Thank you for a great recipe :)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Dana, it's such a nice dish! Full of flavor, and nice at this time of the year. Thanks for the comment.

Claudia said...

It is polar-vortex season here already and this recipe is already warming me and I haven't bought the chilies yet! So comforting. Love road trips to New Mexico. You've reminded me we are overdue.

Kitchen Riffs said...

HI Claudia, it's unusually cold here, too! Really frigid weather for so early. Thanks for the comment.

Bill said...

Another great comfort food recipe, John! You just can't beat a good pork stew and your version looks delicious! Awesome post!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Bill, doesn't pork work so well in stew? And the flavor of green chilies can't be beat! Thanks for the comment.