Sunday, October 6, 2013

Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili

Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili in bowl, overhead view on black

Black beans add rich goodness to this spicy blend

Fall means the beginning of chili season—at least here at Kitchen Riffs central. When the weather turns cooler (as it’s finally beginning to in most of the US), nothing is more satisfying than a hearty bowl of chili.

We like chili season even better when we can try some new variations. Like this succulent recipe. Pork adds a deep flavor that’s irresistible. It also combines beautifully with traditional chili ingredients—as well as some not-so-traditional ingredients, like sweet potatoes.

Chili takes a while to prepare. But you can make it when you have some cooking time, then stash it in the freezer. Because, as good as it tastes when freshly made, it’s even better reheated. So you can use it for quick weeknight dinners or as tailgate fare for watching the big game. It’s even special enough to serve to good friends at a casual weekend dinner party.

And once they taste your Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili, they’ll become even better friends.


Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili in ramekin with spoon and napkin in background

Recipe:  Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili

Some cooks say chili should never contain beans, while others wouldn’t make it without. I’ll eat it either way myself, but I do think beans make a fine addition to almost any chili. I’m using black beans in this recipe, but you could substitute kidney beans, pintos, or whatever strikes your fancy. I will say, however, that the combo of black beans, pork, and sweet potatoes is, well, sweet.

The major flavor in this chili comes from dried, powdered red chilies—i.e., chile powder. This differs from chili powder, which is a mix of chile powder, plus cumin, coriander, and other flavorings. I discussed this in more detail in our post on Chili Basics. See Notes below for a discussion of chile powder possibilities for this recipe.

Prep time for this recipe will vary depending on how quickly you work. The most time-consuming process is cutting up the pork and browning it (you can save time if you buy the meat already cubed). Figure on a good 20 minutes for cutting up the meat, and at least another 20 for browning it. While you’re browning, you can do much of the other work, so total prep should take you under an hour. Cooking time adds another couple of hours. BTW, you can cut up and brown the meat a day ahead, then proceed with the recipe the following day.

This recipe yields a lot—at least 4 quarts, and probably more like 5. So it will feed a crowd. Leftovers freeze well in airtight containers.

Ingredients
  • 2 pounds of pork shoulder or pork steaks
  • salt to taste (about 1 teaspoon Kosher salt, but see Step 1)
  • 2 tablespoons neutral oil for browning meat
  • 2 large onions, peeled and diced (~2½ cups; I like yellow onions in this recipe)
  • 2 tablespoons additional neutral oil for browning onions
  • ~1 teaspoon additional Kosher salt (or to taste; about half this amount if using regular table salt)
  • ~½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper (or to taste)
  • 2 - 3 large jalapeño peppers, diced fine (optional)
  • 3 - 5 garlic cloves, minced fine or sliced
  • 2 - 4 tablespoons mild or medium chile powder, or a mix of the two (to taste; see Notes)
  • 1 - 2 teaspoons chipotle chile powder (optional, but tasty; see Notes)
  • 2 tablespoons ground cumin
  • 1 tablespoon ground coriander
  • 2 tablespoons ground oregano
  • 1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes
  • 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes
  • water for thinning chili mixture
  • 3 sweet potatoes (2 to 3 pounds; exact quantity not critical,) peeled and diced into ½-inch cubes
  • 3 to 4 15-ounce cans of black beans (or 1 pound dried black beans, cooked; see Notes)
  • 2 - 3 cups frozen corn (optional)
  • additional salt, pepper, and chile powder to taste
Procedure
  1. Cut the pork into cubes or rectangles of ½ inch or so (specific size isn’t crucial; it’s more important to have pieces that are all roughly uniform in size—so they’ll take about the same amount of time to cook). Dry the pork chunks thoroughly. Then salt them lightly (just enough to season the meat a little).
  2. Place a large skillet on the stovetop and heat on medium. When hot, add 2 tablespoons of neutral oil. You’ll use this skillet to brown the pork chunks, a process that takes some time and attention to do well. That’s because the better the crust you put on the pork chunks, the tastier they will be. (See Notes for discussion of the Maillard reaction.) Begin by adding a few pork chunks to the skillet (don’t completely fill the skillet at this time, because when you add the meat, the fat will cool somewhat). Once the fat returns to heat, add as many pork chunks as you can without crowding the pan (pieces should not touch each other—if they do, they’ll steam rather than browning). Brown each chunk until the first side has colored nicely, then (using tongs) turn the chunk over and brown another side. Do this until all sides of the pork chunks are nicely browned. Remove the chunks from the pan and drain them on a paper towel-covered plate. Continue adding the rest of the pork chunks to the skillet, adding more oil if necessary, until all the meat is browned. When you’re finished browning, you’ll probably notice that some browned bits of meat have stuck to the bottom of the pan. Here’s how to use them (by deglazing the pan): Drain the grease, then heat the pan. Add ½ cup or so of water and simmer, stirring to release the browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Turn off the heat, and let the skillet sit until you’re ready to use the browned bits (you’ll add them in Step 9).
  3. Meanwhile, peel and dice the onions.
  4. Warm a large Dutch oven—one that holds 6 quarts or more—over medium heat (this is what you’ll be using to cook the chili).
  5. When the Dutch oven is warm, add 2 tablespoons of neutral oil and allow it to heat (it will shimmer when it’s hot). Then add the diced onion, season with salt and pepper, and cook until the onion is slightly brown (5 - 8 minutes).
  6. Meanwhile, wash the jalapeño peppers and cut them lengthwise. Use a teaspoon to scoop out the ribs and seeds (be careful, the oil on these is hot; keep fingers away from your eyes). Chop the peppers into very small dice (or use a mini food processor). Place the peppers in a bowl until you’re ready to use them, then wash your hands with soap and water to remove the hot jalapeño oil from your skin. You may want to reserve a slice or two of the pepper for garnish.
  7. Peel the garlic and either mince it finely or slice thinly (I usually slice garlic because I like larger pieces).
  8. When the onion is slightly brown, add the garlic and jalapeño and cook for a minute or two.
  9. Add the browned pork chunks to the onion mixture, then add the liquid from the deglazed pan (see Step 2).
  10. Add all the spices—chile powder(s), cumin, coriander, oregano—to the pork and onion mixture, then stir to combine and cook for a minute.
  11. Add the canned tomatoes (both diced and crushed), plus a can of water to create a nice soupy consistency.
  12. Bring the chili mixture to a simmer, and cook for an hour (or longer—timing is not critical).
  13. At about the 45-minute mark, wash and peel the sweet potatoes and cut them into cubes of ½ inch or so. Place the sweet potatoes in a microwave-safe dish with a cover, and microwave for 4 to 5 minutes. You want to just soften the sweet potatoes, not cook them completely.
  14. Meanwhile, pour the canned beans into a strainer and rinse them well.
  15. At the hour mark, add the sweet potatoes and beans to the chili, then taste. If necessary, add more salt, pepper, and chile powder. Add more water if too much has evaporated or if you prefer your chili to have a thinner consistency. Set the timer for 30 minutes (the time it should take for the sweet potatoes to cook).
  16. When the timer goes off, check the sweet potatoes to see if they’re soft. If not, continue cooking.
  17. When the sweet potatoes are soft and fully cooked, the chili is almost ready to serve. Add the frozen corn (if using) and cook for 5 minutes. Taste and adjust seasoning. You can keep the chili on a low simmer for an hour or more if you’re not yet ready to serve it. See Notes for garnishing suggestions.
Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili in ramekin with spoon and napkin in background


Notes
  • Chile powders: You don’t need to use a specific chile powder for this recipe. I use medium Hatch chile powder, as well as chipotle powder. Ancho chile powder (which is sold in many supermarkets) also has great taste and is fairly mild. If you can’t find chipotle powder, you can substitute cayenne (but use only half as much), or just leave it out. Chipotle powder has a nice smoky flavor that adds an interesting dimension to this dish, but it’s not essential. 
  • The amount/strength of chile powder mentioned in the previous note produces a batch of chili that I regard as just a bit beyond mild in flavor, with a slight ping of heat to it. But that’s my palate—your taste will differ. You may know from experience that the quantity of chile powder I call for is too much or too little for you. If you’re concerned about the heat level, use half the amount specified, then taste after the chili has been simmering for about 10 minutes. This is a good point to adjust the chile powder level. Don’t wait until the end to adjust, because chile powders need time to simmer in order to develop the full depth of their flavor. (Although it's OK to add a bit more chile powder at the end to increase the spiciness, if you wish.)
  • You can substitute chili powder for the chile powder(s) in this recipe. If you go that route, use 3 to 5 tablespoons of chili powder. Reduce the cumin, coriander, and oregano by about half, or eliminate them altogether (since these flavors are already incorporated into chili powder). The taste of the finished dish won’t be as crisp if you use chili powder, but you’ll still be pleased with it.
  • Browning meat caramelizes the surface, which concentrates and improves flavor. If your browning skillet is too crowded, however, the meat will just steam—and you’ll miss most of the benefit of browning.
  • Ideally, bits of meat will adhere to the browning pan, forming a crust that's extraordinarily tasty. In fact, this crust may have more flavor than the meat itself. That’s because, as you brown meat, a process called the Maillard reaction is taking place (it’s named after Louis-Camille Maillard, who described it in 1912). Essentially, this reaction helps intensify the meat flavors—which are left on the skillet as crust. 
  • We can release these flavors by deglazing the frying pan with a liquid (water in this case, though you can also use wine). Liquid both loosens the crust and dilutes it. We can then pour the scraped crust and deglazing liquid into the cooking chili, recapturing all the flavor that was left behind. 
  • BTW, because browning meat can take a while, I often use two skillets so I can do two batches at once, thus cutting down on the total time needed. 
  • Canned beans are easy to use in this recipe and have acceptable flavor, but make sure you wash off the gunk they’re packed in (Step 14). If you prefer to substitute dried beans for canned (I often do), prepare a pound of dried beans. 
  • How to prepare dried beans? The easiest way is the “quick-soak” method: Sort through the beans, looking for dirt or stones; then rinse off the beans and pour them into a 4-quart (or larger) pot. Fill the pot with water to within a couple inches of the rim; place the pot on the stove and bring to a boil. Boil for two minutes, then turn off the stove and cover the pot; let it sit for an hour. Once the hour is up, drain the beans; place them in a smaller cooking pot and cover them with about an inch of water. Add a peeled and halved onion and several cloves of garlic (peeled or not) for flavoring, then bring the beans to a simmer. Simmer until they’re tender—typically about an hour for black beans. Drain the beans, then add them to the cooking chili in Step 15. 
  • Kosher salt is more coarse than regular table salt, so it’s less salty by volume. If you’re substituting table salt for Kosher, always use less—about half as much. If the dish isn’t salty enough, you can always add more to taste. 
  • If you like thick chili, cook it a bit longer to evaporate more of the liquid. If you prefer a thinner, soupier mix, you can add some water at the end to achieve the consistency you prefer. 
  • There are many garnishes for chili that not only look great, but add a flavor boost. A slice or two of jalapeño pepper, a handful of oyster crackers, some grated cheddar cheese, a sprinkle of diced raw onion, or a dollop of sour cream all work well.
Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili in bowl, with bread in background

Seize the Day (and Your Spoon)

“Wow!” said Mrs. Kitchen Riffs. “This chili has a terrific combination of flavors!”

“Agreed,” I said. “In the past, we’ve done pork chili and we’ve done sweet potato chili. But I never thought to combine the flavors before.”

“I’m glad you did,” said Mrs K R, taking a sip of her Margarita. “I’m loving chili season already!”

“Me too,” I said. “And I’m loving this Beer Bread—it goes really well with chili.”

“Yes,” said Mrs K R, “but we should make some cornbread with our next batch of chili. That’s a dynamite pairing.”

“Funny you should mention that,” I said. “Later this week, I’ll be posting a recipe for Skillet Jalapeño Cornbread—it’s terrific with almost any chili.”

“Count me in for that,” said Mrs K R. “And I hope you’ll be doing another chili recipe, too.”

“Yup,” I said. “Coming up in about a week we’ll be doing Pulled Pork Green Chile Chili.”

“Sounds intriguing,” said Mrs K R, pushing her empty bowl across the table towards me. “But while we’re waiting, let’s enjoy another bowl of this Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili.”

I ladled us up another round. When it comes to chili season, it’s all about carpe diem.

You may also enjoy reading about:
Chili Basics
Sweet Potato Chili with Black Beans
Vegetarian Chili
Beer Bread
No-Knead Homemade Bread
Irish Soda Bread
Margarita
Or check out the index for more recipes

110 comments:

  1. Hi John , I will be making this chili , just to yummy for words , thanks for sharing :).

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    1. Hi Nee, this is wonderful chili! You'll enjoy it. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  2. John, this chili is so wonderful, I don't even know how to best describe it. It's a yummy Fall food. It will also make a great lunch on a cold day in the winter. Finally, it's just a perfect comfort food year-round!

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    1. Hi Julia, it's a really tasty chili. And I agree I'd eat this year-round! Thanks for the comment.

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  3. I love the start of chili season. Maybe this next week I will try this. Looks super good, filling, warming and delicious!

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    1. Hi Debra, isn't chili season wonderful? I'm thinking we may unfreeze some chili tonight for dinner. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  4. wow....such fabulous pics....we got hooked to those amazing food clicks...and the recipe is delicious and soul warming :-)

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    1. Hi Kumar, this is a great recipe, if I do say so myself. ;-) Thanks for the kind words, and comment.

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  5. WOW! This does look good! Have always love the combination of sweet potatoes and black beans, but have never made a chili with it. Love, love, love the chunky pieces of pork! What fantastic chili this is John! Yes, it does make a lot, but it appears to be the type of dish that freezes nicely if there's any leftovers. Always good to see someone else stressing the chile vs. chili thing. The difference between chile powder and chili powder is HUGE! Great post and fabulous recipe!!! Thanks!

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    1. Hi MJ, sweet potatoes make an amazing chili. The pork is super in this, but you can easily omit it and just make a vegan chili using the sweet potatoes and black beans (in fact, that's how I first made this chili). And I agree there's such a huge difference between chile and chili powder. I never buy the latter these days - chile powder is such good stuff. Thanks for the comment.

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  6. I bet it went really good with the beer bread. I'm ready for chili, soups, stews, any thing hearty. I bet the sweet potatoes were good in there, I need to use them more this winter, black beans too. Can't wait to spend a little time whipping up a batch. Hope you are the Mrs. are enjoying your weekend.
    -Gina-

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    1. Hi Gina, the beer bread was great with the chili! We added some cheddar cheese to it, which was super. Sweet potatoes are wonderful in chili - worth trying. Thanks for the comment.

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  7. it's the start of soup and chili season over here too and i'm excited about it! i love this chili and the pictures are beautiful John!

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    1. Hi Alyssa, I love chili season! We'll be making it almost every week from now until April. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  8. Mmm, chili with flavours, this looks delicious :D

    Cheers
    CCU

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    1. Hi Uru, this really is delish. So nice for the cooler weather we're now experiencing! Thanks for the comment.

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  9. Love the conversations you have with Mrs KR. And I agree with her - more chili. I love the combination of sweet potatoes and the pork.

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    1. Hi Kitchen Butterfly, those conversations are so much fun to write! And I don't think one can ever have enough chili. Thanks for the comment.

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  10. Colors are so complimentary of each other! Never tried sweet potatoes but it sounds like a lovely addition. I was about to make chili this weekend but the weather decided to be 90 degrees again. Hopefully in several weeks! Can't wait for the green chile pulled pork recipe as well.

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    1. Hi Ilke, isn't this a pretty chili? I do like to use a lot of colors when I cook. We had close to 90 last week but it's quite chilly now. Chili weather! Thanks for the comment.

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  11. I'm looking forward to the jalepeno skillet cornbread - that does sound like it would go very well with this chile that looks so warming and comforting as your weather cools down. I tend to ask my butcher to cut up all my meat into the sizes I need as it saves me so much time and my knives seem to be in a permanent state of needing to be sharpened xx

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    1. Hi Charlie, I had some of the leftover cornbread today - it's terrific! Good idea on your part asking the butcher to do the, well, butchering! It really does save time. Thanks for the comment.

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  12. I just went to your Vegetarian Chili recipe post - I bet these are just great with loads of jalapeño peppers and soy rizo from Trader Joe's ;)

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    1. Hi veganmiam, that veggie chili recipe is terrific. You can just skip the meat in this chili recipe, and make it vegan - it'll have great flavor. Thanks for the comment.

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  13. I want a bowl of your deep and rich Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili! It's so comforting with the cooler weather. :) I'm not a big sports fan, but this would be the perfect dish for game days too. ;)

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    1. Hi Amy, this really is perfect tailgating fare! And wonderful for chilly weather - which we're having now. Thanks for the comment.

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  14. I always love the conversation between you and Mrs. KR. My husband and I are often so busy with the kids and work and we rarely had proper conversation. I hope to sit down and enjoy a meal with my husband just like how you do with Mrs. KR. Pork and sweet potatoes in Chilis. Yum! With the freshly baked bread, it's such a perfect fall/winter meal!

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    1. Hi Nami, Mrs KR and I are lucky - we really do have great conversations all of the time. Among other things we always walk together at least an hour a day, so we have plenty of time to chat. And the conversations on the blog are very true-to-life! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  15. Yum! We're in Houston right now (and it's not cold enough for chili) but we go back to Colorado on Thursday, and I can't wait to make this! I've already added the ingredients to my grocery list. After a long weekend of travel, it was nice to end my Sunday here. I hope you have a wonderful start to your week! Thanks for sharing, my friend!

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    1. Hi Monet, at this time of the year, Houston is still more than a tad warm. ;-) But you can have this when you get back to Colorado! Thanks for the comment.

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  16. Oh man, now I need to have hubby wood smoke a pork shoulder.....Yum! I love everything about this recipe, all the flavors sound wonderful together! Yum, Take care, Terra

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    1. Hi Terra, the pulled pork chili that's coming up is something. You can use a wood-smoked pulled pork, or a quicky, Mexican-style shredded pork (which is what I'll be featuring in the recipe). Anyway, today's recipe is super, and well worth trying. Thanks for the comment.

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  17. This looks so lush!!!
    I love a good chilli and I always like beans in mine. Recipes that can be made in bulk are heaven sent thanks for sharing )

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    1. Hi Gourmet Getaways, we always cook in bulk when we can, and freeze. It just makes it easier to put a quick, good meal on the table. Thanks for the comment.

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  18. Gorgeous plate of food. I am literally drooling for them

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    1. Hi Cquek, isn't this nice? When it comes to food, drooling is always encouraged! Thanks for the comment.

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  19. Wow, wow, wow, John, I reckon my Peter would like this! Thank you for sharing, it sounds yummy!

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    1. Hi Lizzy, this is really good stuff. I love making chili! And this is one of my better ones (and I know dozens and dozens of different kinds). Thanks for the comment.

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  20. Flavorful and comforting! A mouthwatering chili.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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    1. Hi Rosa, nothing says fall like chili, does it? At least to me. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  21. Such a tempting post this is...deliciousness on a plate and such a gratifying meal :)

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    1. Hi easyfoodsmith, it really is tempting stuff. I unfroze some leftovers for dinner last night! Thanks for the comment.

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  22. I made chili over the weekend, too! And manservant would love this version as he'd get his meat and potatoes all in one bowl. Plus he loves beans. This is a great one John. Can't wait to give it a try!

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    1. Hi Abbe, definitely chili weather, isn't it? ;-) This really is a good dish - work trying. Thanks for the comment.

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  23. Wow, John you've got my mouth watering so much right now. I haven't cooked with sweet potatoes much so I'd love to give your recipe a try. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Hi Nancy, sweet potatoes are wonderful in chili! They combine so well with spicy flavors. Thanks for the comment.

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  24. It's rainy and cold here and I could sure use a bowl of this!

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    1. Hi Ashley, rainy and cold? Chili weather for sure! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  25. Now, that dish looks so so good. Not big on pork, might try it out with chicken. Just the way it looks with the chilies, would be so perfect on a cool wintery night.
    The conversation is so lovely. As Nami says, conversations with hubby is so hard with 2 little ones running around constantly with questions.

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    1. Hi Asha, I haven't made this particular recipe with chicken, but I've made it with turkey, and it works quite well. Definitely yummy. Glad you enjoy the conversations! Thanks for the comment.

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  26. Love chilis and soups that can be frozen! So great for quick dinners. The pork, sweet potato, bean, corn combo sounds great!

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    1. Hi Laura, at this time of the year (and throughout winter) we always have frozen chili and soups on hand. As you say, wonderful for dinner in a hurry! Thanks for the comment.

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  27. What a gorgeous chili! I need to try pork...and the sweet potatoes are a delicious twist as well. Great recipe, John!

    PS...can't wait for your pulled pork green chile chili :)

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    1. Hi Liz, that pulled pork chili is really good. And although it's better with actual pulled pork, there's a quick substitute that has dynamite flavor! Thanks for the comment.

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  28. This looks fantastic. I'm not a pork eater, but I think if I remove the pork and add more beans, I can make a Veg Chili. I need to make some this fall/winter. :-)

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    1. Hi Honey, you definitely can turn this into a veggie chili. In fact the first combo of sweet potatoes and black beans that I made into chili was vegan. Just omit the pork and you're good to go (you can also check out the index for my Sweet Potato and Black Bean Chili). Thanks for the comment.

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  29. This absolutely looks amazing, love that you made it chunky.

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    1. Hi Raymund, it's really good stuff - so tasty! Thanks for the comment.

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  30. Bean or no beans I agree. I 'll take it either way. GREG

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    1. Hi Greg, same with me - any chili is good chili. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  31. This beats regular chili, hands down! But then I love sweet potatoes, and can just imagine how fabulous they make this rendition.

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    1. Hi Carolyn, sweet potatoes work so well in chili. I sometimes add them to a beef chili, too. Thanks for the comment.

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  32. I love using pork in chili, too, John, and I'm going to borrow your idea of using chunks of meat. I've done it with my tomato sauces but never thought to try it with chili. The sweet potatoes, too, are new and sounds like a great idea. I think chili is great on those days when Fall feel more like Winter and I bet this one would be perfect. Thanks for sharing another of your great recipes.

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    1. Hi John, chunky chili is delish! It somehow has a "meatier" feel, at least to me. The sweet potatoes are a winner - definitely worth doing. Thanks for the comment.

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  33. I agree. Fall is chili season, possibly because football fans like myself are always looking for a good chili to serve friends. Great idea to add sweet potatoes!

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    1. Hi Kristi, the sweet potatoes are wonderful! They really work so well with the spices. Thanks for the comment.

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  34. I'm so happy it's chili season, John! As I was reading, it began to rain so now I'm really in the mood for a warm bowl. I love all the spices and sweet potatoes you added. And I can't wait to see your Skillet Jalapeno Cornbread!

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    1. Hi Hannah, chili is so great when it's rainy and cool! The perfect dish, IMO. Thanks for the comment.

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  35. I wish I could buy pork here, I really do! It's just so difficult to get a cut of this meat, I haven't had pork meat in ages except sausages of course. John your chili looks so very inviting and comforting, I would be satisfied with a full bowl now. =)

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    1. Hi Helene, although I know buying pork in India is a challenge, for some reason I thought Goa was an exception. Beef makes a great substitute, or poultry. Thanks for the comment.

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  36. What a wonderful combination of ingredients for chili. I'm going to try this next time I make chili. Looks hearty and delicious!

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    1. Hi Vicki, isn't this nice? Really great flavor, too, which is so important with chili. Thanks for the comment.

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  37. this looks beautiful! perfect for fall, as all chili should be. I'm the same with beans: i think it depends on the type of chili, but i'm not opposed the idea of beans or no beans in it, so long as the beans work with the other ingredients. Gorgeous, this chili: love the colors.

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    1. Hi Shannon, fall always means chili for me! And this is a particularly nice one, IMO. I do like food with a lot of color to it! Thanks for the comment.

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  38. We love chilli at house too. Especially the husband. As soon as football season and cold weather rolls around that's his first request. I'll make this with chicken but I love the combination, sweet potatoes and black beans. Makes a nice change from my usually chunky beef chilli. Thanks John!

    Nazneen

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    1. Hi Nazneen, I think this chili would be quite nice with chicken. And it is a nice change from beef, although we probably have that more than any other kind. Thanks for the comment.

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  39. John, this sweet and spicy chili is comfort food at its best! I can't wait to try it on a chilly Austin night. Wonderful recipe with fabulous flavors!

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    1. Hi Georgia, this really is great on a chilly night (although you're probably still a bit away from that in Austin). Thanks for the comment.

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  40. Where's my spoon?! This looks delightful. I love pork in stews and chilies. Love the combination of sweet from the potatoes and heat from the chilies.

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    1. Hi Karen, sweet potatoes in chili work really well. I love them! Thanks for the comment.

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  41. I'm glad drooling is acceptable John because that's what I'm doing after reading this delectable post. I haven't made Chili in years. Marion isn't too keen on the hot stuff but now that I know it can be frozen, well, that's a different story. Chili is perfect Fall food with or without the beans. I guess that's why somebody, somewhere, decided to proclaim, October National Chili Month!

    Thank you so much for sharing...

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    1. Hi Louise, I kinda forgot all about October being National Chili Month! Hard to keep up with all the celebrations. ;-) Although you do a great job of that for us. Thanks for the comment.

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  42. Who doesn't like a bowl of rich and flavorful chili!? I cook a good amount of pork but have never thought of putting it in chili. This is going to be the dish I must make this fall. And I can feel the temperature drop here in NYC. Thanks for sharing this wonderful recipe and love the fresh alapeño peppers you have in the pictures!!

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    1. Hi Yi, pork chili has a flavor that's at once familiar,yet different. Really worth making - I think you'll like it. Thanks for the comment.

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  43. Absolutely delightful John! Love the colors, the flavors, the pictures and the ingredients. It's fabulous to freeze a batch of such a delight for handy dinners. I need to do that more often. I will be trying this one. Thank you so much!

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    1. Hi Minnie, I love to make big batches of chili and freeze it so I always have some on hand. Makes it easy to do a quick dinner on those nights when I don't have time to cook. Thanks for the comment.

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    2. I am loving the ingredients in this chili. A little sweet form the sweet potato, spicy from the peppers, savory and hearty with the beans and pork. A real fun twist on an old favorite and great tip on freezing for later day as it always chili on the cool days always hits the spot. Take Care, BAM

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    3. Hi Bam, isn't this a nice recipe? Familiar, yet a bit different. Thanks for the comment.

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  44. This looks incredible John! So hearty and comforting. I want a big bowl of it right now!!! YUM. :)

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    1. Hi Anne, it's really a nice recipe - totally flavorful. Thanks for the comment.

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  45. When the temperatures go down, nothing comforts you like slurping a bowl of chili. But this bowl of chili- oh that looks heavenly - so deeply red. I'd love that.

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    1. Hi Malou, I'm with you on loving chili when the weather turns cooler. One of my fave flavors. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  46. ...okay so I am back to pin this recipe so that Mr GG stay true and faithful to my cooking, I know he will love it :)

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    1. Hi Gourmet Getaways, who wouldn't love this chili? ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  47. It still seems strange to see you heading into fall whilst we're celebrating the dawn of springtime here! Opposite ends of the globe, united through the internet! This chili looks divine. Love the colours, the textures, everything. Definitely making this soon.

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    1. Hi Laura, I always enjoy reading the blogs form down your way and thinking about how different the seasons are! So the recipes I'm seeing - and saving - now are ones I'll be making in about 6 months. This chili really is great - good enough to make even when the weather is warm! Thanks for the comment.

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  48. John this is amazing. I am just drooling over here. I want to try this one really bad.

    Ps do you have a pin it button and I'm just blind as a bat tonight?

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    1. Hi Kim, no, I don't have a pin it button - I should look into that. Makes it harder to pin, I know, and I apologize. Anyway, this is great chili - really worth trying. Thanks for the comment.

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  49. I had cook pork with potato for about thousands times aither it with soy sauce based, chilli based, or tomato based etc but never with sweet potato...
    tempting to try!

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    1. Hi dentistvschef, pork and sweet potato is a dynamite combo - worth trying. Thanks for the comment.

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  50. I would love to try this gorgeous dish! Looks so satisfying!

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    1. Hi Asmita, isn't this pretty? I love the colors. And the flavor is wonderful! Thanks for the comment.

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  51. It's not fall but I could eat that whole dish and not spill a bit!

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    1. Hi Maureen, this is good in warm weather, but amazing when it's cool. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  52. Love the addition of sweet potatoes in this hearty chili! Yum!

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    1. Hi Kiran, sweet potatoes are so great in chili! They add so much, and work so well with the spicy flavors. Thanks for the comment.

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  53. I can't think of a better combination than pork and sweet potatoes! I've never tried sweet potatoes in chili, but I'm really liking the idea! You're really motivating me to get into chili mode! Thanks another great post, John!

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    1. Hi Bill, sweet potatoes are awesome in chili! They add so much flavor, and work as well in a beef chili as this pork one. And they're great in a veggie chili, too - just an all around good ingredient. Thanks for the comment.

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  54. Hi John, this pork dish is extremely good. Very mouth watering, great to go with rice or french loaf.
    Thanks for sharing this great recipe.

    Best regards.

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    1. Hi Amelia, I really love this dish! Pork and sweet potatoes work so well together. Thanks for the comment.

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