Sunday, October 13, 2013

Pulled Pork Green Chile Chili

Pulled Pork Green Chile Chili, overhead view on black

Flavorful and mild

Most chili recipes call for dried chilies—especially red ones in the form of powder. But chili made with fresh, whole green chilies has tremendous flavor. 

Green chilies are just juvenile red chilies. Red chilies are fully ripe, and often are dried before using (which concentrates their flavor and spiciness). You can also find spicy green chilies, but it’s more common to see mildly flavored ones—perfect for those who like a bowl of chili, but don’t want serious heat.

In this recipe, we pair tasty green chilies with “pulled” pork. The meat we’re using is really just Mexican-style shredded pork (similar to that which is often found in tacos, burritos, and enchiladas), but it has virtually the same texture and appearance as the traditional wood-smoked pulled pork used for barbeque dishes. And it has great flavor.

So taste buds, prepare to tingle.

Pulled Pork Green Chile Chili with cornbread in background

Recipe:  Pulled Pork Green Chile Chili

Genuine pulled pork makes a dandy substitute for shredded pork in this recipe. But using Mexican-style shredded pork is much easier and faster because you don’t need to wood-smoke and slow-cook the pork (which can take half a day.)

This recipe has a number of steps, but it’s not complicated. You need to prepare the shredded (or pulled) pork. You also need to roast green chile peppers so it will be easier to peel off their skins (which taste rather unpleasant). Then you need to combine the two with beans and cook them to make, well, chili.

BTW, exact measurements aren’t critical here: As long as you’re in the ballpark, things will be fine. In particular, you may decide you want to use less or more pork or green chilies.

To save time, you can substitute already cooked, BBQ-style pulled pork (just as long as it hasn’t been doused with barbecue sauce). And you can substitute canned green chilies—check the Mexican aisle of your supermarket and you’ll find something there. See Notes for more about substitutions.

If you use substitutions, this recipe takes a bit more than an hour to prepare (including about 15 minutes hands-on prep time). If you make the recipe as written, add another 2½ hours or so—but most of that time is unattended.

This recipe makes six hearty servings. Leftovers keep for a few days if stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Or you can freeze them for up to six months.

Ingredients

For the pulled pork:
  • ~2 pounds bone-in pork shoulder (this will make about a pound of cooked, shredded pork)
  • salt and pepper to season (about ½ teaspoon Kosher salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper; see Notes)
  • 1 - 2 tablespoons neutral oil
  • 1 or 2 cups of water
  • 2 teaspoons dried chile powder (optional; I like either Hatch Medium or Ancho)
For the roasted green chilies:
  • ~9 ounces mild to medium green chilies (about 7 whole chilies; use Hatch green chilies if you can find them; otherwise, Anaheim green chiles make a good substitute—see Notes)
For the chili:
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1 tablespoon neutral oil
  • ~1 teaspoon Kosher salt (or to taste; about half this amount if using regular table salt)
  • ~½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper (or to taste)
  • 1 - 3 jalapeño peppers (depending on how spicy you want the chili to be)
  • 2 - 3 garlic cloves
  • 7 - 8 ounces roasted, diced green chilies (see below for preparation; may substitute canned—see Notes)
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander powder
  • ~1 pound pulled pork (see below for preparation; may use up to twice this amount)
  • 1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes
  • water or chicken stock (for quantity, see Step 9 of Chili Procedure below)
  • cayenne pepper or chili powder (optional)
  • 2 - 3 cans of red kidney beans (or ~½ pound cooked dried kidney beans; see Notes)
    additional salt and pepper to taste
  • garnish of jalapeño pepper or shredded cheddar cheese (optional; see Notes for more garnish possibilities)
Procedure

For the pulled pork:
  1. Rub the pork with salt and pepper to very lightly cover.
  2. Heat a Dutch oven or covered casserole large enough to hold the pork (about 4 quarts) on the stovetop at medium heat. When hot, add the oil and let it heat (it’ll shimmer; this takes maybe 15 seconds). Add the pork and brown all sides (this will take about 15 minutes).
  3. When the pork is nicely browned, add a cup of water and the chile powder, if using. Bring to a simmer, cover, and set timer for 1 hour.
  4. At the hour mark, check the water and add more if necessary. Set the timer for another hour.
  5. When the timer goes off (2 hours total cooking time to this point), check the pork for tenderness—a paring knife should easily penetrate the meat and it should be starting to shred. Cook longer if you wish (no more than 3 hours total), but it should be ready now.
  6. Let the pork cool, then—using a pair of forks—shred the meat. Discard the fat and the bone, and reserve the meat (a bit more than a pound) for the chili.
  7. Note: What to do with the leftover cooking liquid? You can cool and degrease it, then use it in place of some of the water in the chili recipe; or just discard it.
 For the roasted green chilies:
  1. Wash the green chilies and spread them out on a broiler pan (preferably one with a wire rack). Place under the broiler and heat until the chile skins begin to blister and turn black. Turn the chilies and repeat until all sides are blistered. (If in doubt, turn early and often.)
  2. Place the chilies in a bowl and cover with a plate or plastic wrap. Allow them to steam for 15 minutes or so.
  3. Put on a pair of kitchen gloves to protect your hands from the chile spices. Using your hands, rub the skin of each chile until it comes off. This usually is quite easy to do, but if necessary you can use a paring knife to help with recalcitrant parts.
  4. Next, cut off the stem end of each chile (just below the stem). Slit open each chile lengthwise and (wearing gloves) remove the seeds and cut off the white pith (these parts contain much of the chile “heat” without contributing much flavor).
  5. Dice the chilies into pieces about ½ inch square, and use in chili preparation below. BTW, you might want to nibble a small piece now to judge the heat index of the chile. If it's too hot, you may want to reduce the amount you use in the recipe.
 For the chili:
  1. Peel and dice the onions.
  2. Warm a large Dutch oven—one that holds 6 quarts or more—over medium heat (this is what you’ll be using to cook the chili).
  3. When the Dutch oven is warm, add 2 tablespoons of neutral oil and allow it to heat (it will shimmer when it’s hot). Then add the diced onion, season with salt and pepper, and cook until the onion is slightly brown (5 - 8 minutes).
  4. Meanwhile, wash the jalapeño peppers and cut them lengthwise. Use a teaspoon to scoop out the ribs and seeds (be careful, the oil on these is hot; keep fingers away from your eyes). Chop the peppers into very small dice (or use a mini food processor). Place the peppers in a bowl until you’re ready to use them, then wash your hands with soap and water to remove the hot jalapeño oil from your skin. You may want to reserve a slice or two of the pepper for garnish.
  5. Peel the garlic and either mince it finely or slice thinly (I usually slice garlic because I like larger pieces).
  6. When the onion is slightly brown, add the garlic and jalapeño and cook for a minute or two.
  7. Add the diced green chilies, plus the cumin and coriander. Stir and allow to cook for a minute or two.
  8. Add the shredded or pulled pork, stir, and cook for a minute.
  9. Add the canned tomatoes, plus a can of water or the equivalent amount of chicken stock to create a nice soupy consistency.
  10. Bring the chili mixture to a simmer, and cook for about 30 minutes (or longer—timing is not critical).
  11. At the half-hour mark, taste the chili and add cayenne pepper or chili powder if you want to jazz up the flavor. Pour the canned beans into a strainer and rinse them well; then add the beans to the cooking pot. Cook the chili for another 20 or 30 minutes.
  12. Adjust seasoning and serve. Garnish with optional slices of jalapeño peppers or a bit of shredded cheddar cheese (see Notes for other garnish possibilities).
Pulled Pork Green Chile Chili in ramekin with spoon and napkin in background

Notes
  • Let me reiterate that exact quantities of pork or green chilies (or anything, really) are not critical in this recipe. In particular, if you’re new to green chilies and are uncertain about how well you’d like their flavor, use less (even half as much as I specify). In that case, if the chili turns out blander than you were expecting (a real possibility), just add some cayenne or chile/chili powder to the dish halfway through cooking to liven it up.
  • Just a reminder:  Chile powder is made from dried red chilies that are ground up. Chili powder is a combination of chile powder, plus cumin, coriander, and other spices.
  • Hatch green chilies, from New Mexico, have deep flavor—so use those if you can (they’re often hard to find throughout much of the US).
  • Green chilies vary from mild to rather hot, and you often don’t know what you’ll be getting until you try them. So it’s an adventure! Use less at first if you’re worried about the heat level. I suggest tasting a small piece so you can judge the heat index, and use less if you think your chiles are too spicy.
  • If you can’t find Hatch chilies, substitute whatever long, thin green chile pepper you can find. Every supermarket carries Anaheim chilies, which have good flavor (I recommend them). These are quite mild, so don’t be afraid to use more rather than fewer of these.
  • If you don’t want to roast your own chilies, you can buy canned ones in the Mexican aisle of your supermarket. The cans come in various sizes, but you can almost always find a 4-ounce size. Pick up two of these.
  • BTW, my instructions for roasting chilies are very basic (I didn’t want to make this post too long). For a thorough and complete description of how to roast and peel green chilies, visit MJ’s Kitchen. She does a great job of describing how to roast them on a grill (or you can use a broiler, as I do). And she’s forgotten more things about green chilies than I’ll ever know—check out her other recipes while you’re there. 
  • As noted above, if you have some traditional wood-smoked pulled pork on hand (without added Q sauce), by all means use it in this dish—it’ll be sensational. Otherwise, simply prepare Mexican-style shredded pork as directed. 
  • I find that about 2 pounds of untrimmed (i.e., no fat removed) bone-in pork shoulder will yield a little more than a pound of cooked meat. But a bit more or less doesn’t matter much in this recipe. 
  • Canned beans are easy to use in this recipe and have acceptable flavor, but make sure you wash off the gunk they’re packed in (Step 11). Dark red kidney beans work best in chili, though I sometimes combine them with light red kidney beans and pintos just to have a nice mix of flavors and colors. If you prefer to substitute dried beans for canned (I often do), prepare half a pound of dried beans. 
  • How to prepare dried beans? The easiest way is the “quick-soak” method: Sort through the beans, looking for dirt or stones; then rinse off the beans and pour them into a 4-quart (or larger) pot. Fill the pot with water to within a couple inches of the rim; place the pot on the stove and bring to a boil. Boil for two minutes, then turn off the stove and cover the pot; let it sit for an hour. Once the hour is up, drain the beans; place them in a smaller cooking pot and cover them with about an inch of water. Add a peeled and halved onion and several cloves of garlic (peeled or not) for flavoring, then bring the beans to a simmer. Simmer until they’re tender—typically about 45 minutes to an hour for kidney beans. Drain the beans and discard the onion and garlic; then add the beans to the cooking chili in Step 11. 
  • Kosher salt is more coarse than regular table salt, so it’s less salty by volume. If you’re substituting table salt for Kosher, always use less—about half as much. If the dish isn’t salty enough, you can always add more to taste. 
  • If you like thick chili, cook it a bit longer to evaporate more of the liquid. If you prefer a thinner, soupier mix, you can add some water at the end to achieve the consistency you prefer. 
  • There are many garnishes for chili that not only look great, but add a flavor boost. A slice or two of jalapeño pepper is a great garnish, as is some shredded or grated cheddar cheese. Or use oyster crackers, a sprinkle of diced raw onion, or a dollop of sour cream.
Pulled Pork Green Chile Chili in ramekin with spoon and napkin in background

Mild or Wild?

“Terrific flavor,” said Mrs. Kitchen Riffs, spooning her Pulled Pork Green Chile Chili.

“Yup,” I said. “Those Hatch green chilies deliver. And these aren’t hot at all.”

“The supermarket must have been selling the mild ones,” said Mrs K R. “Some green chilies can pack heat.”

“Which is why I suggest Anaheim chile peppers for those who don’t want to walk on the wild side,” I said. “The ones you’ll find in most grocery stores are from California, and they’re usually much milder than the ones grown in New Mexico.”

“Of course, I love spicy,” said Mrs K R. “I really like that beef chili that you featured in the post on Chili Basics—especially since you tend to add much more chile powder than specified in the recipe. I can’t get enough of that!”

“Well, that’s because you’re a wild thing,” I said.

“Hey, isn’t it against blogging rules to reference two different songs in the same post?” asked Mrs K R.

“Oops,” I said.

“But your chili does make my heart sing!” she added.

That’s Mrs K R. She makes everything . . . groovy.

You may also enjoy reading about:
Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili
Chili Basics
Sweet Potato Chili with Black Beans
Vegetarian Chili
Skillet Jalapeño Cornbread
Beer Bread
No-Knead Homemade Bread
Or check out the index for more recipes

98 comments:

  1. I wish I knew how the American chiles taste, I really have no clue. We don't really have much chile in our cooking in Europe, so it's difficult to buy them there. In India of course we have green chiles but they are smaller and then there are kashmiri chiles but those always come dried. I will try your recipe John with the local chiles in Goa and see how it comes. Looks super delicious btw!

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    1. Hi Helene, basically the green chilies I'm talking about here have similar flavor to the really hot ones I suspect you have in India, but less intense, and definitely much less heat. At least that's my guess - without knowing exactly what chilies you have available, there's no way of knowing. But do give this a try - it's a fun dish. Thanks for the comment.

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  2. I love Chili and you just made me crave for one! i bet this is so perfect with the corn bread

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    1. Hi Peachy, I think cornbread must have been invented to accompany chili! Well, maybe not, but it's a great combo. Thanks for the comment.

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  3. Hi John , love the ingredients in this pull pork chili , it will be on my dinner table with the jalapeno cornbread this week , thanks for sharing :).

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    1. Hi Nee, isn't this a fun recipe? And the flavor is terrific! Mild, but deep. Thanks for the comment.

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  4. My taste buds are tingling just looking at your photo! That looks delicious. I say this a lot about your food, but I have to say it again; my husband would go crazy over this. He loves his pulled pork. And he loves his chile. But then again, who doesn't? :)

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    1. Hi Gomo, who doesn't love chile indeed! I sure do. This is a really fun recipe - your husband will love it (you, too). Thanks for the comment.

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  5. Yum, your Pulled Pork Green Chile Chili is definitely perfect perfect for the cooler weather. The cornbread is the perfect pairing too. Now you've got me craving for these. :)

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    1. Hi Amy, it's really a nice chili! And our weather is turning cool indeed, so so welcome. Thanks for the comment.

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  6. Perfection in a bowl. Love green chilis and next year I am either growing Big Jims or ordering a case from NM.

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    1. Hi Debra, isn't this nice? I've actually thought about ordering a case of chilies from New Mexico, and may one of these days. This year our supermarket had them, but usually NM chilies are hard to find here. Thanks for the comment.

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  7. Come winter, I definitely want to tuck into a big bowl of this. A great dish to warm you up in no time.

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    1. Hi Carolyn, this really is a nice fall and winter dish. You'd love it! Thanks for the comment.

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  8. What a gorgeous bowl of chile chili!!! Looking through the list of ingredients I can see that this chili has lots and lots of flavors coming from many different sources, contributing to a depth of flavors. That cornbread is definitely the perfect side. Much better than a flour tortilla which is what I usually grab when a dish has chile in it. I think it's time to buy a pork shoulder. Thanks so much for the lovely shoutout John! :) Hope you've had a wonderful weekend.

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    1. Hi MJ, you deserve a shoutout! And chilewise, you know your stuff. Anyway, this is a super recipe, and one that's fun to play with. Hope you enjoy! Thanks for the comment.

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  9. This looks like a great comfort food dish for any cold day!

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    1. Hi Nik, it really is a nice dish - tons of flavor. Thanks for the comment.

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  10. This is a great looking chile and I love a recipe where you don't have to be too exact with the measurements! I can imagine this being very enjoyable as your weather cools down xx

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    1. Hi Charlie, you really don't need to be all that exact with measurements in many of my recipes. It's that whole "season to taste, cook until done" thing. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  11. Oh, my. This is one enticing chili recipe. I've pinned it...as I really, really want this for dinner soon!

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    1. Hi Liz, this is such a fun recipe, and one I'll bet you'd enjoy customizing. Thanks for the pin, and the comment.

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  12. We went to a chili cookout contest a while ago and that was such an experience. An absolute comfort dish and this one looks so good. This one in particular is something I would love on a cool wintery night. Thanks for a great dish.

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    1. Hi Asha, chili cookoffs can be a lot of fun! So much tasting, so little stomach capacity. ;-) This is a super recipe, and I'll bet you'd enjoy it. Thanks for the comment.

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  13. This is another great recipe, John, and an informative post, too. I especially appreciate your taking the time to explain what you meant by green chilies. We in the north do not have access to the chilies that y'all do. (I saw Hatch chilies just once this season.) I normally use the powders when I make chili but your tip about using fresh makes sense. I'm going to pay closer attention at the markets to see who stocks what. Thanks for taking the time to both share your recipe and to teach us a few things -- in a good way. ;)

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    1. Hi John, chile terminology can be a bit confusing, and you raise a good point about some people maybe not knowing which chilies to buy. When in doubt, always ask your friendly produce person - I've found them to be quite helpful, and they know their stuff. With that said, I know in Chicago you'll be able to find Anaheim chilies. The Hatch ones are seasonal, alas, and I only saw them for a couple of weeks in my market too. Thanks for the comment.

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    1. Hi Cquek, this really is a super recipe! Thanks for the comment.

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  15. John, another fantastic recipe! I grow my own chillies, but always let them go to red.... now you've inspired me to pick and use some green ones! Thanks ever so much!

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    1. Hi Lizzy, it's fun using both red and green chilies - their flavors are similar, yet quite different. Thanks for the comment.

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  16. A groovy post! Your chili looks awesome, and thanks for all the great instructions. Have a good week!

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    1. Hi Beth, ;-) It's really a nice chili! Thanks for the comment.

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  17. You do realize John that I am not going to be a happy camper until I have a bowl of red, and I mean soon. Marion will not eat chili in any way shape or form so I may just need to trim down this recipe a bit and stash the leftovers in the freezer right along side that cornbread of yours.

    Thanks for all the kitchen notes on the different chile peppers. I still get them all confused!

    Thank you so much for sharing, John...

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    1. Hi Louise, this is pretty mild chili, but it still does have a bit of a kick. So it sounds like it's no go for Marion, alas. But this is easy to cut in half. Thanks for the comment.

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  18. We love green chile, I prefer the milder side, while Matt prefers the heat so we often use a mix and I hand him his bottle of Chipotle Tabasco. He would love this chile and with the weather getting colder it is time to make some soup ~ great recipe, thanks.

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    1. Hi Judy, that's a really sensible solution for situations like yours where you like it mild, Matt wild. I suspect this chili would be perfect for you as-is (maybe use only 1 jalapeno). Thanks for the comment.

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  19. Gosh this looks dreamy. My father-in-law can't do spicy but maybe he'll want a night out. :)

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    1. Hi Maureen, my father is the same age as your FIL, and he doesn't like much spice these days, although he didn't find this chili too much for him. But it does have some spice, so maybe not ideal for your FIL. Thanks for the comment.

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  20. For some reason those hatch chilies are hard to find here, but I do like them. I wish I had a big bowl of this, I'm ready for some real food, I may have o.d.'ed on all the Halloween desserts I've been whipping up. Lol. Soon, I'll be making real food.
    -Gina-

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    1. Hi Gina, this year we got the Hatch chilies only for a couple of weeks, and last year didn't get them at all. I may buy a bunch mail order next year! Looking forward to seeing all the great Halloween things you'll be doing! Thanks for the comment.

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  21. Now this is the perfect meal right here! So different and tasty looking!

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    1. Hi Ashley, it's a great dish - incredibly flavorful. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  22. I think you're completely right, and fresh chili peppers are cheap too. Wonderful recipe for this time of year for sure!

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    1. Hi Kristi, fresh chile peppers are indeed a good deal, price-wise. And flavor-wise, too. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  23. Love this twist on chili! Pulled pork makes everything better. I have thought about using fresh tomatoes instead of canned - do you think that would work?

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    1. Hi Laura, fresh tomatoes would definitely work. I always use canned at this time of the year because their quality is better, but if you have access to great fresh tomatoes, those would be wonderful. Thanks for the comment.

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  24. Divine! I'm loving all the spices used in this delicious chili. Yum!

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    1. Hi Kiran, doesn't this have nice flavors? It's truly yummy! Thanks for the comment.

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  25. Wow chillies and pulled pork, this is so warming in a cold rainy nights

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    1. Hi Raymund, this really is the sort of dish that calls out to be eaten when it's chilly, and even better if it's rainy! Thanks for the comment.

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  26. Your chili is bursting with flavor. Love the ingredients and yes MJ does know a thing or two or three about chilis and everything spicy. Yummy recipe.

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    1. Hi Vicki, this really does have a lot of flavor - I love it! Thanks for the comment.

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  27. Delicious! What a beautiful bowl of chili. Ry and I made the mistake of buying extra hot green chiles earlier this summer. We had to throw away our stew because it was too hot! We'll have to try again with your recipe!

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    1. Hi Monet, too bad about your stew! One of the problems with green chilies (red ones, too) is you often don't know exactly how hot they are. Better to start with less, then add more if the chili or stew is too wimpy. Thanks for the comment.

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  28. I always buy a bushel of Hatch chilies so i can have them for the freezer. Out here, they roast them for you. But I have to warn you-Hatch chilies come mild to hot. When you get the hot-and they are green-let me tell you-they will burn your fingers just peeling the skin off. You can smell the hot ones but the roasters will be happy to mix up the heat varieties if you want. Great recipe. I love anything Hatch!

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    1. Hi Abbe, you make a good point that Hatch chilies can come quite hot (although most of the country will see them much more on the mild side). You often don't know what you're getting, which, although an experiment, means you should taste before using. Thanks for the comment.

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  29. Super delicious and a very comforting bowl of chili. This meal would definitely go well with my Indian palate that loves chilies, not that hot variety though!

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    1. Hi easyfoodsmith, you'd definitely like this dish! Loads of flavor. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  30. No dounbt this pulled pork chili is an awesome accompaniment to your corn bread. I want to grab a spoon and dive right in. It is so amazing the vast amounts of chill around the world. When you live in one destination your choices change but I am sure I could mix and max my chilis to get the right heat index. I bet this is even better the day after. I will be right over...Did you save me a piece of the corn bread too? Have a super week. BAM

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    1. Hi Bam, of course I saved some corn bread for you! And you make a good point about chilies - they really vary from place to place, so using local ones (and mixing and matching) can give you wonderful results. Thanks for the comment.

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  31. You've got my mouth watering, John! I see the cornbread in the background, I love it alongside chili. Thanks for sharing:)

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    1. Hi Nancy, this really is a super dish, and I know you'd love the flavors in it (and the cornbread!). Thanks for the comment.

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  32. Pulled pork chili! Oh this should really satisfy any hunger and especially mine. :) This is really hearty, John. Thank you! :)

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    1. Hi Ray, it's a great dish, and really does kill those hunger pangs. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  33. Loved to have a bowl of those chili now :) Its is comforting food for this weather. Liked the spices you used in this recipe!! Thanks for sharing the recipe!!

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    1. Hi Shibi, aren't the flavorings nice? This really is great for cool weather. Thanks for the comment.

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  34. We don't eat pork but should try with beef or turkey. Looks delicious.

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    1. Hi Lail, this would be good with beef or in particular turkey. Poultry and green chilies is a great combo of flavors. Thanks for the comment.

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  35. I have pork butt in the freezer. GREG

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    1. Hi Greg, sounds like you are all set to make some chili! Thanks for the comment.

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  36. I adore pulled pork in all of its forms. I haven't tried it in chile, but your chile sounds perfect right now!

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    1. Hi Laura, pork chili really is an interesting dish - loads of flavor, but different, of course, than traditional beef chili. Definitely worth a try. Thanks for the comment.

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  37. I have been loving all your pork dishes, it must be my favourite meat!!
    You have used it in such delicious and spices ways too, I will have to try this dish too YUM!

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    1. Hi Gourmet Getaways, pork has great flavor, doesn't it? One of my faves too! Thanks for the comment.

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  38. Wow! This chili sounds mouth watering. Great recipe for the cooler weather we are now having.

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    1. Hi Dawn, it's really a nice recipe! A little different, which is always fun. Thanks for the comment.

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  39. What an awesome looking bowl of chili! This is definitely chili weather and reading this post is making me hungry! Awesome post, John. Thanks!

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    1. Hi Bill, this really is a super recipe - tons of flavor. Thanks for the comment.

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  40. Hi John,

    I have been seeing many chilli recipes lately... It must be a warming and satisfying dish to eat for autumn and chilly weathers.

    Eating this with your Jalapeno cornbread sounds extra satisfying.

    Zoe

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    1. Hi Zoe, yup, the weather is getting a bit colder here, so we're all pulling out our soup and chili recipes. ;-) Ad you're right that this is terrific with jalapeno cornbread! Thanks for the comment.

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  41. I appreciate your very well written recipe! You go into very details and it was fun to learn all the tips from you. I love chilis but I'm shameful to say I've never made one in my kitchen! But love ordering it whenever I can. I'm saving this recipe and hoping to try one day! :D

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    1. Hi Nami, chili is really easy to make! It might look a bit complicated, but it's a lot like many soup: several steps, but none of them difficult. Definitely you need to make chili sometime! Thanks for the comment.

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  42. Any spice and spiced pork would win my herth.....
    great plating too my friend, capturing stew dish is not that easy for me,
    well done!

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    1. Hi dentistvschef, it's a really tasty recipe - worth having! Thanks for your kind words, and comment.

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  43. Wonderful! That is a mouthwatering chili.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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    1. Hi Rosa, it is indeed mouthwatering. Good stuff! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  44. This chili looks really flavor-packed and hearty! I love a good chili and I like to use fresh chiles in mine as well. This is perfect for the cool weather heading our way!

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    1. Hi Amy, fresh chilies work so well in chili, don't they? I love their flavor! Thanks for the comment.

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  45. Oh my! That looks amazing. I recently made a chili verde using pulled pork and I went wild for it. This I know I'll love. Thanks for the recipe John!

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    1. Hi Anne, I saw your chili verde recipe! Similar concept, although we approached it rather differently. Yours is good. Thanks for the comment.

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  46. You know I am loving this, and want it with your delicious jalapeño cornbread! Hubby and I still have not made chili this Fall, crazy right? I have been craving it for weeks though, may be time to make some this weekend:-) Fabulous recipe, Hugs, Terra

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    1. Hi Terra, you really do need to get your chili on! Thanks for the comment.

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  47. Corn bread and chili ... Match made in heaven :) We use beef though instead of pork. Your chili looks intense, inviting and...um...sexy :)
    That pretty little green pepper slice added a happy note to the bowl :)

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    1. Hi Nusrat, you can make this same chili with beef. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  48. Hi John, this pulled pork dish look extremely delicious. Looking at the ingredients, I can imagine it sure taste and smell heavenly. :)) Thanks for sharing the great information, appreciate your kind thoughts.

    Best regards.

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    1. Hi Amelia, it's a great dish! The flavor of green chilies is wonderful! Thanks for the comment.

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  49. I know that I'm joining the conversation a bit late but I just ran across this recipe a few months ago. I made it to take along on a late fall camping trip and it was AMAZING! This was perhaps the best chili I, myself have ever made. The layers of flavors are phenomenal. What made it especially easy for me is that I had lots of pulled pork that that I had recently smoked when a local market had butts on sale for .69 per lb in the freezer and also had both hatch and jalapeno peppers in the freezer that we had fire roasted. Getting ready to make this again later this week. Can't wait! Thanks for sharing this recipe!

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    1. Hi Cindy, isn't this a great recipe? And pretty easy to make -- our favorite kind. :-) Haven't seen pork butt that cheap in ages -- although a few weeks ago a local market had it for 99 cents. I smoked a bunch then, too! Thanks for the comment.

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