Sunday, August 4, 2013

Crab Rangoon

Crab Rangoon on plate with dipping sauces and Tiki Mug in background

Queen of the Pupu Platter 

This August is Tiki Month here on Kitchen Riffs!  All the food and drinks will be Tiki-themed.  First up?  Crab Rangoon — crisply fried dumplings filled with a savory mix of cream cheese and crab.  You won’t be able to eat just one!

Crab Rangoon is a staple of the Pupu Platter (the appetizer assortment that’s ubiquitous in Tiki- and Polynesian-themed restaurants around the world).  In the US, you’ll also find this dish at more than a few Chinese-American restaurants. 

And by the way, have you ever wanted to make your own Pupu Platter?  Well, you’re in luck!  All our food posts this month will feature recipes that are platter-appropriate.

So dust off your Tiki torches and flower leis, and start planning your next backyard party.  The guests will go wild over your Pupu Platter — especially its star, Crab Rangoon.


Crab Rangoon on plate with dipping sauces in background

Recipe:  Crab Rangoon

Most of us haven’t tasted Crab Rangoon outside of a restaurant, but it’s really easy to make.  The biggest hurdle?  It requires deep frying — something most of us rarely (or never) do.  But it’s not hard, and I’ll provide a lot of tips in the Notes.  If you fry properly (which means at the right temperature for the correct amount of time), the food absorbs very little oil.  Which means it’s much healthier than you might think.  And if the idea of frying still turns you off, no problem.  In the Notes I link to a recipe that allows you to bake, not fry, Crab Rangoon.

Crab Rangoon is usually served with a dipping sauce.  Chinese mustard is a common one, and quite easy to make.  (I provide a recipe for it in the Notes.)  Less traditional but equally tasty is Sriracha sauce (serve it straight from the bottle or thin with a bit of water if you want a less spicy sauce; you can even use ketchup if you want to add a bit of additional sweetness). Other traditional favorites for dipping include duck sauce, sweet plum sauce, and sweet-and-sour sauce. Check the Asian aisle at your grocery store — most will stock at least one of these. Crab Rangoon would also pair well with our Plum Salsa.

Prep time for this recipe is about 15 minutes, with additional cooking time for each batch about 3 minutes. You’ll be frying several batches, but 30 minutes total should be more than enough time.

This recipe yields about 2 dozen Crab Rangoons, but it’s easy to double or triple if you need more.

Leftovers? There probably won’t be any. But if there are, you can refrigerate them and microwave to reheat. They won’t taste nearly as good as freshly fried, but they’ll be OK.

Ingredients
  • 4 ounces cream cheese (remove from refrigerator 30 minutes ahead)
  • 3 ounces imitation crab or canned crabmeat (or more to taste; see Notes)
  • 2 scallions (use all of the white part and half of the green part, reserving the rest of the green for garnish)
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce (optional)
  • oil for frying (1 - 3 quarts, depending on cooking vessel, enough to fill with oil to a depth of about 2 inches; see Notes)
  • ½ package wonton wrappers (about 2 dozen)
Procedure
  1. Half an hour before you want to prepare the Crab Rangoon, remove cream cheese from the refrigerator to warm (you can use it straight from the fridge, but it’s easier to mix with other ingredients if it’s warm).  Place the cream cheese in a medium-sized mixing bowl.
  2. Finely dice the crab, and add to the mixing bowl.  With a sturdy spoon, combine cream cheese and crab (if you double or triple the recipe, it’s easier to do this in a stand mixer).
  3. Wash, dry, and clean the scallions.  Slice thinly, and reserve about half the green part for garnish.  Add to mixing bowl.
  4. Add soy sauce and Worcestershire sauce (if using) to bowl, and mix together.
  5. Place oil in a wok, a deep electric skillet, a Dutch oven, or another heavy bottomed-pot with high sides (or use a free-standing electric fryer if you have one).  Make sure the oil doesn’t reach more than halfway up the side of the pot (see Notes).  Heat the cooking container over medium high heat until the oil reaches 350 - 375 degrees F.  (Use a thermometer!  See Notes for more about thermometers.)  While you’re filling the wonton wrappers in Step 6, check the oil temperature from time to time – you don’t want it any higher than 375, nor lower than 350 F.  Once it reaches that temperature, adjust the stovetop element to keep it at 350 to 375 F.  Optional:  Preheat oven to 200 degrees F if you need to hold the cooked Crab Rangoon pieces until you’re finished frying (see Step 8).
  6. While the oil heats, assemble the Crab Rangoon pieces.  Lay a wonton wrapper out on the kitchen countertop or other flat surface, with one edge pointing towards you (as you look at the wonton, it’ll form a diamond).  Place a heaping teaspoon of cream-cheese-and-crab mixture in the middle of the wonton skin.  Wet the edges of the wonton wrapper, and fold the top corner down to meet the bottom corner, forming a triangle.  Be sure to press all the air out of the filled wonton, and firmly seal the edges.  Place on a large plate or tray, and cover with a damp cloth towel or paper towels.  Repeat until you’ve used all the cream-cheese-and-crab mixture (this recipe will make about 24 Crab Rangoon pieces, depending on how full you fill the wonton skins).
  7. By now, the temperature of the oil should be at 350 to 375 degrees F.  You’ll probably be frying the Crab Rangoon in batches, depending on the size of your wok or pot (I usually do about 6 at a time).  Don’t put too many in at one time — if you crowd the pot, whatever you’re frying won’t brown well.  Turn on your exhaust fan — frying does create some odors, so you want to get rid of them.  Gently lower the first batch of Crab Rangoon pieces into the hot oil, being careful not to splash oil on yourself.  Fry for about 2 minutes until golden brown, then turn over and fry for about 1 minute more.  The first side will usually be a bit more golden than the second.  Time is a little imprecise here — it depends on how brown you want the Crab Rangoon to be.  I usually come in at about 2½ minutes total time per batch. 
  8. Remove the fried pieces (i usually use a slotted spoon something similar so the oil drains out), place them on a rimmed baking sheet lined with paper towels to drain (or if you have a wire cooling rack that fits on your baking sheet, use that) and serve immediately.  These are best hot from the oil, so I always serve them as I fry them.  If you need to hold the first batch(es) until you’re finished frying them all, you can slide the baking sheet into a 200 degree F oven.
  9. Sprinkle the Crab Rangoon pieces with some chopped green scallions for garnish, and serve with your choice of dipping sauces (see Notes).
Crab Rangoon on plate with dipping sauces in background

Notes
  • What kind of oil should you use for frying?  You need something relatively inexpensive that can get hot without smoking or breaking down.  I like peanut oil or canola oil.
  • How much oil will you need?  Enough to fill your cooking container to at least 2 inches.  Never fill the container more than halfway with oil — otherwise you risk having the oil bubble over.  I use an electric wok for deep frying, and a quart of oil works fine (it leaves plenty of room so the oil won’t overflow).  But some cooking pots will require more — as much as 2 or even 3 quarts.  If you don’t know how much to buy, just fill the container to the appropriate level with water, then pour the water into a measuring container (such as one of those big 2-quart measuring cups) to see what would be appropriate.
  • For proper browning, you should heat the oil to at least 350 degrees F, and not more than 375 F.  If you have an electric wok or deep electric skillet with a thermostat, that’s ideal.  But even then, you should always use a thermometer to make sure the temperature is correct. 
  • Many people recommend attaching a candy thermometer to the frying pot, and leaving it there while you fry (and it’s an excellent idea). 
  • I’m a fan of the Thermapen instant-read thermometer (which gives you a highly accurate reading within 3 seconds), so I just use that.  But the Thermapen is an expensive thermometer, and you can easily get by with something less costly.  The other downside of using an instant-read thermometer is that you have to keep dipping the probe into the hot oil, because you do need to know what the oil is doing temperature-wise when frying.  With a candy thermometer, you can just glance at the dial. 
  • Why the emphasis on oil temperature?  Because it really does affect quality.  If the oil temperature drops too low, the food absorbs oil instead of cooking in it, turning everything greasy and soggy.  If the oil temperature gets too high, the food may burn.  So keep the oil between 350 F and 375 F.
  • Note that when you add a batch of filled wontons to the frying container, the oil temperature will drop — though it should quickly come back to the proper level.  Just don’t add too many pieces to the pot at one time, otherwise the oil won’t recover its heat quickly enough.  Limiting the number of pieces you add at one time also helps prevent the oil from spattering.
  • Frying is safe, but there is always the possibility that something could go wrong.  So I always keep out a lid as large as (or larger than) the top diameter of the pot.  That way, in the unlikely event there’s a fire, I can plop the lid on the frying pot, starving it of oxygen and putting out the fire.
  • I also keep a fire extinguisher in my kitchen — and recommend that you do the same.  Get one that’s rated ABC (the US rating; ratings vary by country).  That means it will work on ordinary solid combustibles, flammable liquids and gases, and electrical fires.  If you fry a lot, you might want to get a Class K fire extinguisher, which is made specifically for cooking-oils and fats. 
  • Whatever you do, don’t throw water on a grease fire!  It won’t extinguish the flames, and will probably make things worse.
  • What to do with the leftover cooking oil?  You can generally reuse it a time or two, until it begins to break down (when this happens, it will begin smoking, and may give food an “off” taste).  To store, I let the oil cool, then pour it into a bottle (usually the now-empty bottle that the frying oil came in).  I generally line a large funnel with a coffee filter, place the funnel in the bottle, and begin pouring in the cooled oil.  Because of the filter, this can take a while.  You can speed things up by not using a filter, but make sure not to pour in any of the browned bits of food that will have gathered on the bottom of your frying pot (just discard those bits, along with the small amount of oil that will remain in the pot).  Tightly cap the used oil, and store in a dark place.
  • If the idea of frying doesn’t appeal to you, the Kraft foods website has a recipe for Baked Crab Rangoon. I haven’t tried it, but it looks decent enough. 
  • You can also make Crab Rangoon using the traditional preparation, but instead of frying it, bake it in a 450 degree F oven. I haven't tried this, but I’ve seen recipes for it that look good. I’d bake for 15 minutes or so if you’re going to try this — but you’ll have to experiment, because I haven’t. 
  • Imitation crab is the traditional “crab” ingredient for Crab Rangoon (yes, really). It is usually sold in sticks or big flakes, and has a mild “crabby” taste. You’ll find it in the seafood department at your grocery store. It typically contains Alaska Pollock as the main ingredient (along with other ingredients). Some brands include a tiny bit of real crab. 
  • Alternatively, some recipes use canned crab. I’ve not tried that, but I understand that it works. 
  • Of course, you can also use real crab! (Though again, I haven’t tried that.) Some cooks say the real stuff actually doesn’t taste as good in this dish as imitation crab. And of course, real crab will be much more expensive than imitation. 
  • I suggest 3 ounces of crab to 4 ounces of cream cheese, but some recipes recommend equal quantities of each, or even a bit more crab than cream cheese. So you may want to experiment. 
  • To make Chinese mustard, mix equal parts of dried mustard powder (like Colman’s) with cold water. Stir, and if you want a thicker consistency, stir in a bit more mustard powder. Let sit for about 10 to 15 minutes and then use immediately — that’s when it reaches its peak flavor. If it sits longer, the flavor and pungency diminish. 
  • For more on Tiki culture, see our posts on the Mai Tai, Planter's Punch, The Zombie, and Fog Cutter Cocktail.
Crab Rangoon on plate with dipping sauces and Tiki Mug in background

Tiki-technics

“Gosh, these are good,” said Mrs. Kitchen Riffs as she bit into a Crab Rangoon piece.  “I love these hot and crisp from the fryer.”

“Nothing better,” I agreed, reaching for another piece.  “And I love dipping them in sauce.  Both the Chinese mustard and the Sriracha are great, though now I’m wishing I had made some duck sauce too.”

“Next time,” said Mrs K R, forking herself some more Crab Rangoon.  “So, what drink will we be having to kick off Tiki Month?”

“One of the classics,” I said.  “The Volcano Bowl.  I’ll be posting about it later this week.”

“You mean the one that kinda sorta looks like a fiery volcano?” she asked.

“That’s the one!” I said excitedly.  “It’s big enough for two or more people.  And it’s usually served with the ‘volcano’ actually flaming.”

Wiping my chin, I added, “I just love Tiki Month!”

“I bet Kidde does too,” said Mrs K R. 

“Who’s that?” I asked.

“They’re the guys who make our fire extinguisher.”

You may also enjoy reading about:
Singapore Sling Cocktail
The Zombie
Mai Tai
Planter's Punch
Fog Cutter Cocktail
Plum Salsa
Salmon and Cream Cheese Dip
Cheese Straws
California Clam Dip

104 comments:

  1. Hi John, I like your crab Rangoon, very inviting and awesome. The wonton skin look so crispy and addictive.
    Thanks for all the wonderful tips... not many of us like to do deep frying at home.

    I made the baked version crab Rangoon last year...not bad the taste...I enjoyed eating it. I blog about it in December 2012 with the crab Rangoon history under title "Golden pagodas, warm fiery rubies and crab Rangoon."

    Have a nice weekend, regards.

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    1. Hi Amelia, I'll definitely have to check out your post! I almost did something about Crab Rangoon history, but decided not to because the post was getting way too long, and there's so much contradictory info about the dish! Thanks for the comment.

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  2. Oh John, I have never heard of these little morsels, but I could pick one right off that plate and devour it with gusto! Thanks for sharing a great recipe!

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    1. Hi Lizzy, these are really terrific. Definitely addictive, too. Which is either a good or bad thing. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  3. Crab Rangoon and the volcano bowl - can it get any better than this?

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    1. Hi Maureen, Mrs K R and I took pictures of the volcano bowl last night, fire extinguisher at the ready. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  4. crab rangoons look perfectly crisp brown outside and will taste creamy and delicious inside...amazing balance of textures and irresistibly scrumptious, heavenly :-)

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    1. Hi Kumar, it's truly a delish dish! And you're so right about the texture. Thanks for the comment.

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  5. I love these things and like you said, never thought about making them at home (I think it's the deep frying bit!) but these look gorgeous and worth trying. I love how crispy they look, perfectly fried and I think we need duck sauce (I like to dip mine in both hot mustard and duck sauce)

    Nazneen

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    1. Hi Nazneen, that deep frying bit really does turn off a lot of cooks, usually me too. But these are worth it! And you're right that I really should have made a duck sauce too. Thanks for the comment.

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  6. I could honestly eat my weight in crab rangoon. And yours looks so delicious and crisp I can almost hear the wonderful crunch of each bite. I had no idea that imitation crab was the traditional choice for these guys, that certainly makes them more affordable.

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    1. Hi Chris, aren't these addictive? And it's so weird that imitation crab is the "authentic" crab to be used in these! Thanks for the comment.

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  7. Oh we always order this as appetizer but never tried at home due to frying part since I tend to burn some of my skin always...I think I will give it a try with your tips on frying. I know I have to watch the temperature but never went the extra step to put a thermometer. Enjoy your Tiki month :))Wish I was your neighbor :))

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    1. Hi Ilke, a lot of people fry without a thermometer, but I find it's so much easier when I use one. These are definitely worth making at home - problem is, once you start making them, can you stop? ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  8. oh man I love rangoons! Such a good recipe I can't wait to make these.

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    1. Hi Natlie, aren't these wonderful? One of my favorite things on a Pupu Platter! Thanks for the comment.

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  9. Oooh, on a Sunday night with a fruity cocktail, I can totally go for a plate of these. An oldie but goodie that nobody -- absolutely nobody -- can ever turn down. ;)

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    1. Hi Carolyn, when I made these, they were dinner! With a fruit cocktail, actually! Thanks for the comment.

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  10. Yay for tiki month! I wish we had a backyard to throw a party and serve these tasty rangoons! Great job!!

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    1. Hi Kristi, Tiki Month is going to be so much fun! For me, at least, and I hope for everyone! Isn't this a terrific dish? So incredibly tasty! Thanks for the comment.

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  11. These look so crispy and delicious. I'm not too familiar with Tiki cuisine (even though I'm from NZ!) so I'm looking forward to seeing the rest of your posts on this topic xx

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    1. Hi Charlie, most Tiki cuisine is kinda faux-Polynesian fare, so nothing authentic about it! But it can be tasty and fun. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  12. What a fun theme!!! You're off to a marvelous start with these irresistible crab rangoons!!

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    1. Hi Liz, this is kinda fun, isn't it? ;-) I'm certainly enjoying myself! Thanks for the comment.

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  13. I love the Tiki theme, can't wait to more fun inspired recipes!

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    1. Hi Pamela, glad you like the theme - this should be a lot of fun! Thanks for the comment.

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  14. To this day I can still remember my first Pupu Platter. It was at the Bali Hai in Northport Long Island, NY. And, it was my first date EVER!!! Sadly it is no longer there but oh my goodness...I really think the popularity of the Pupu Platter should be revitalized and from the looks of your Crab Rangoon, it may be well on its way!

    Thank you so much for sharing, John. I am going to LOVE Tiki Month @ Kitchen Riffs!

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    1. Hi Louise, Pupu Platters can be great - they always have something everyone will like. Fun anecdote about your first Pupu Platter. Thanks for the comment.

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  15. Your crab rangoons look delicious. They look so nice and crispy.

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    1. Hi Dawn, it's wonderful stuff! And when you want crispy, it's hard to beat deep frying. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  16. Oh I am so looking forward to August at Kitchen Riffs!!! This was a great start. We always order the PuPu Platter when we eat Chinese and these rangoons are my favorite! Thanks for all of the information on how to make them. I would definitely love to make them at home and now I can! Thanks John! Keep them coming! :)

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    1. Hi MJ, Tiki Month is going to be fun! These really are pretty simple to make, and a batch is a great dinner for two, with some leftovers (although the leftovers lose their crispness). Not the healthiest dinner in the world, however. ;- Thanks for the comment.

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  17. Oh yum! I wanna fry up some crab rangoon right the way. Your dipping sauces selections are just as wonderful. And I agree, don't think anyone can stop at just one.

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    1. Hi Amy, crab rangoons really are addictive! Have to have several, maybe more. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  18. Mouthwatering! Lovely filling.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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    1. Hi Rosa, the filling really makes the dish - that hot cheese tastes so good! Thanks for the comment.

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  19. Great looking crab rangoons!
    Thank you for posting the info on baking in a 450 degree oven as an alternative to frying-I am one of those that def. do not like to deep fry - for purely lazy reasons as I don't like to clean up the mess after :)
    Shashi @ http://runninsrilankan.com

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    1. Hi Shashi, I doubt if you'll get quite the same color as when you deep fry, though I suppose you could rub some oil on the rangoons and run them under the broiler for a minute or so to brown them more. And of course I haven't tried the recipe, so I don't know if it works. But it sounds as if it should. Thanks for the comment.

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  20. Hi John, these look amazing and delicious! I don't like deep-frying because it always make the whole house oily and smoky, but once in a while is definitely okay, especially when these look so tempting!

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    1. Hi Jasline, you'll always get some odors when you deep fry, but if you keep the oil at the right temperature and use fresh oil (and run the exhaust fan!), I find odors are minimal. But it does depend on what you're frying too - fried fish tends to have more odor, for example, or at least in my experience. Thanks for the comment.

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  21. Love crab rangoons and I had no idea they were this easy to make! Thanks for sharing. Now I know what I'm bringing to the luau themed BBQ this weekend. :)

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    1. Hi Tina, these really are easy, and so tasty - truly good stuff. Thanks for the comment.

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  22. So addictive!! I love crab rangoons served with a cool and refreshing cocktail :) Thanks for sharing, John!

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    1. Hi Kiran, crab rangoon is total junk food, but totally delish! Love the things. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  23. I love these! Perfect little morsels of goodness. Can't wait to get through the month. Looks like I should have lost 5 pounds so I can enjoy it more! Does this mean a tiki party over Labor Day? I have the torches!

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    1. Hi Abbe, we have torches too! Some little mini ones that I'm trying to figure out how to fit into some pictures. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  24. Aren't these wonton wrappers so handy? I make samosas (Indian snack with vegetable filling) with these. Liked the filling... I am sure no one can stop with just Rangoon.

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    1. Hi Shibi, wonton wrappers really are super - I sometimes use them to make ravioli when I'm lazy and don't feel like rolling out the dough! And I don't think it's even legal to have just one crab rangoon. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  25. Replies
    1. Hi Ashley, they really did taste and look great. So delish! Thanks for the comment.

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  26. These look so perfectly crispy! I have only had crab rangoon once at a restaurant that wasn't very good, so I need to give it another shot!

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    1. Hi Laura, they were totally crisp - and delish! Too bad about your first crab rangoon experience - done right, they're extremely tasty. Thanks for the comment.

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  27. Really nice crisp of beauty, John I love these wonton treats and I can't stop once I started. These crab rangoon wontons are really good stuff. Thank you and have a good week, John! :)

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    1. Hi Ray, wonton anything is pretty good, isn't it? ;-) And I think crab rangoons are the best of all! Thanks for the comment.

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  28. I saw this picture on Foodgawker, but I didn't know it was yours John! They look dangerously good. Plus, for me it's always exciting to make things I've never made before. Putting these on my list!

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    1. Hi Yvonne, I agree it's fun to make new things - I do it all the time! And these are worth your time. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  29. I wish you were working in the kitchens in at least one of the restaurants in this area -- or at least post your recipe in each of them. Crab rangoon are usually such a disappointment, either too little crab or too little filling. It's a sure sign that when they are folded "creatively," the filling will be cut in half. Yours, though, are perfect. A good ratio of crab to cream cheese and plenty of both in each rangoon. Yum! This was a great post, John, made even better knowing that it is but one of a series. This will be an August to bookmark! :)
    Thanks!

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    1. Hi John, I've been pretty lucky in my restaurant crab rangoon experiences, but I've heard enough horror stories to know there is a lot of bad crab rangoon out there. The nice thing about making your own is you can make a crab/cream cheese ratio that suits your taste. And of course put in the proper amount of filling. Glad you're looking forward to Tiki Month, and thanks for the comment!

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  30. Actually I've never tried crab rangoon even in restaurant, but it sounds like something for me. I love fried goods :)

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    1. Hi Marta, it's a good dish. You never know - you may end up eating it for breakfast! Thanks for the comment.

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  31. These finger food look delicious John, crispy and creamy at every bite...yum!
    Have a great week ahead :D

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    1. Hi Juliana, these are both delish, and so much fun to eat! Good stuff. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  32. Crab rangoons are one of my favorite indulgences and you really made them look even more irresistible with your recipe, John! I have to try your homemade variation!

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    1. Hi Georgia, these are so much fun to make! And homemade always tastes just a bit better, don't you think? Thanks for the comment.

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  33. I love crab rangoons , the one you order in resturants are not to tasty... made them at home a little better ... but this one is going to beat them all hands down .
    Just a reminder John , setting up my tent on your lawn so pleeeeeese don't call the police , I bookmarked this spot for the month of August ... Tiki Month ...you betcha {Giggling} Thanks for sharing :)

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    1. Hi Nee, I was wondering about that tent! ;-) There's going to be some great Tiki-themed stuff this month. Thanks for the comment.

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  34. Dude these are gorgeous. I mean off the charts pretty. You do good work my friend.

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    1. Hi Kim, gosh, thanks for such kind words! And for commenting.

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  35. Looks sensational John! You photographed it beautifully! Do you deliver? ;)

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    1. Hi Anne, I wish I did deliver! ;-) Thanks for the kind words, and comment.

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  36. This recipe is being pinned ASAP!!
    I just love tasty finger food and I showed hubby and he now wants to marry you :)
    ...so I better do a good job on coping the dish ;)

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    1. Hi Gourmet Getaways, lol @ hubby! I'm sure you'll do a terrific job when you make this. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  37. This post features my very favorite appetizer at our favorite Asian restaurant.I've got to try these. They look delicious! Another great post!

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    1. Hi Bill, this is so much fun to try at home, particularly when you have guests. Nothing beats something hot and crisp from the fryer. Thanks for the comment.

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  38. I am gonna say the same thing as I have on my last few times… Oh my god yummmmmm

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    1. Hi cquek, these truly are yummmmmmm! Well worth making. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  39. I love crab rangoon, thanks for sharing these.

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    1. Hi Nik, Crab Rangoon is so great, isn't it? I can never resist! Thanks for the comment.

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  40. Oh my gosh, I love crab rangoon! Thanks so much for sharing the recipe so now I can make them at home too.:)

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    1. Hi Nancy, this is such a fun dish, isn't it? Enjoy! And thanks for the comment.

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  41. Hi John. Oh my I love crab rangoon, but I've never thought of making it at home. Why not? This looks so delicious and it is far easier than I thought! I'm going to splurge on some real crab and make these as soon as baby allows. Thank you for sharing!!

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    1. Hi Monet, I don't believe I've ever had these with real crab (just the fake or canned stuff that restaurants usually use). That sounds delish! Thanks for the comment.

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  42. What a fun month this is going to be! I can't wait to see all of the delicious Tiki treats and cocktails coming out this month! Beautiful Rangoon, nice and crispy and I love all the fun dipping sauces with it. If Mrs. Kitchen Riff is ever tired of being the official QA and tester, I will happily take over a few shifts for her. Take Care, BAM

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    1. Hi Bam, Tiki Month is going to be a lot of fun! Mrs K R is pretty happy doing the tasting, but I'll certainly keep you in mind. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  43. am in for anything with crabs. just posted some with crab siticks few weeks back on my cook-e blog. thanks for dropping by !

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    1. Hi Sona, isn't this a fun recipe? So tasty! I agree anything with crab is wonderful. Thanks for the comment.

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  44. These look so good! Never heard of them before now.

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    1. Hi Caroline, you have a treat in store! ;-) They really are worth trying. Thanks for the comment.

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  45. This is going to be a fun month in your kitchen. Terrific job on the rangoon...they look so crispy and delicious.

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    1. Hi Karen, it really is going to be a fun month! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  46. You guys have too much fun at your house! I want to come visit! My mom gave me a deep fat fryer a few years ago. I've used it once. I need to get it out and have Tiki month at my house too!

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    1. Hi Kristi, we do have a lot of fun! Visit any time. ;-) I've never had one of those deep fryers - always used a Dutch oven, or more recently an electric wok - but I'll bet those are fun to use. Thanks for the comment.

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  47. I love crispy stuff.. yummy!

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    1. Hi cquek, fried stuff is so great, isn't it? Thanks for the comment.

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  48. The perfect finger food, fried crispy and definitely delicious! Yum....

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    1. Hi Raymund, aren't these great? Delicious, as you say, and they really are wonderful finger food. Thanks for the comment.

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  49. Oh wow these look delicious! Perfect appetizer for kids and adult. Bookmarked to try very soon!

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    1. Hi Nami, these really have a pleasant flavor - and fairly mild, so most kids will really like them. Thanks for the comment.

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  50. I remember reading this post, pinning this post, but somehow never made a comment....blurgh!! I love snack recipes, appetizers that are small and fun. I love that you had a tiki theme, and this recipe sounds so delicious!!! Take care, Terra

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    1. Hi Terra, Tiki month is turning out to be so much fun! I'm having a great time with it, and hope everyone reading is too. Thanks for the comment.

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  51. Thank you for the in depth tips about deep frying! It can be a bit tricky sometimes so I really appreciate a good guide :)

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    1. Hi Christine, frying is kinda scary for a lot of people, me included. But it's easy once you know what's going on, and figure out how to control the temperature of the oil. Thanks for the comment.

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  52. Love tiki month! These look so crispy, golden and wonderful.

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    1. Hi Amanda, Tiki month is a ton of fun! And these are really superb - really worth trying at home. Thanks for the comment.

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