Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Roast Squash & Sweet Potato Chili with Kale

Roast Squash & Sweet Potato Chili with Kale in bowl

This vegan crowd pleaser is perfect for Thanksgiving Eve

All of us in the US know Thanksgiving is coming up, right? And you probably know what you’ll be serving for the big meal. But how about the evening before?

Some picky out-of-town guests may be arriving on Thanksgiving Eve. You know the ones we mean: That college student who turned vegetarian. The fussy in-law who insists on having the latest food-fad ingredients at every meal. And so on.

Fortunately, this Roast Squash and Sweet Potato Chili with Kale covers all the dietary bases. It’s vegan, so it will appeal to non-carnivores. But it’s also chili (aka flavorful guy food), so meat eaters won’t mutiny. And it has kale, so it should pass muster with the food faddists. It’s even gluten-free.

Best of all? It’s easy to make. In fact, it’s basically a one-dish meal. So you’ll save time cooking—which will give you more time for arguing around the dinner table. Ah, those family gatherings.


Roast Squash & Sweet Potato Chili with Kale in ramekin

Recipe: Roast Squash & Sweet Potato Chili with Kale

The sweet flavor of winter squash works perfectly in a spicy dish like chili. Any winter squash will work, though we prefer butternut squash in this dish. We like to add sweet potatoes for another flavor note, but you could use squash alone if you prefer.

When preparing butternut squash, the biggest challenge is peeling and cubing it. For a terrific photo tutorial on how to do this, click on over to Alanna Kellogg’s A Veggie Venture. Alanna has forgotten more about winter squash than we’ll ever know.

Now that you’ve seen the photos, here’s a quickie recap on prepping butternut squash: First, make sure you have a sharp knife. Second, cut just a bit off the bottom of the squash (to create a stable base) and a bit off the top (because you don’t want to eat that). Third, cut off the “neck” (the skinny part) of the squash right above the more bulbous body. Fourth, with your sharp knife, slice the skin off the lower body of the squash—much like you’d cut the peel off an orange. Then slice the skin off the neck of the squash. Fifth, cut the neck into chunks of ½- to ¾-inch. Then cut the body of the squash in half vertically, scoop out the seeds, and cut the squash into chunks of ½- to ¾-inch.

Prep time for this dish is about 20 to 30 minutes. Cooking time adds about an hour and a half (much of it unattended).

This recipe yields a lot—4 quarts or so, perfect for feeding a crowd. It will freeze OK, although the squash may become a bit soft (it still tastes good; but the texture won’t be quite as firm).

Ingredients
  • ~1½ pounds butternut (or other winter) squash, peeled and cubed (the peel and seeds add considerable weight, so you’ll need a 2½ to 3 pound butternut squash in order to yield 1½ pounds ready to cook; exact quantity isn’t critical, however)
  • ~1½ pounds sweet potatoes (about 2; again, exact quantity isn’t critical)
  • ~2 tablespoons olive oil for roasting the squash and sweet potatoes (extra virgin is better, but pure olive oil—the cheap stuff—works too)
  • Kosher salt to taste
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • ~2 cups diced onion (about 3 medium ones or 2 large; again, exact quantity not critical)
  • ~1 tablespoon olive oil for sautéing onions
  • additional Kosher salt for seasoning onions (about ½ teaspoon)
  • 3 to 5 garlic cloves (to taste)
  • 2 to 3 large jalapeño peppers, diced fine (optional; to taste)
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons mild or medium chile powder, or a mix of the two (see Notes for discussion and alternatives)
  • 2 teaspoons chipotle chile powder (or to taste; may omit if you don’t like spicy)
  • 2 tablespoons dried ground cumin
  • 1 tablespoon dried ground coriander
  • 2 tablespoons dried oregano
  • 1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes
  • 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes
  • water to thin the chili mixture
  • 1 bunch kale (about ¾ pound)
  • 3 to 4 15-ounce cans red kidney or pinto beans (or a mix of both; to taste)
  • garnish of reserved kale, jalapeño pepper slices, chopped parsley, chopped cilantro, and/or oyster crackers (optional)
Procedure
  1. Start by roasting the squash and sweet potatoes (you can skip this step and instead cook these veggies in the chili, although you’ll lose a bit of flavor; see Notes): Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Peel the squash and cut it into ½- to ¾-inch dice (see headnote for instructions). Place the diced squash in a large bowl. Scrub the sweet potatoes, then dry and peel them. Cut the sweet potatoes into ½- to ¾-inch dice. Add the diced sweet potatoes to the bowl containing the squash. Add olive oil to the bowl and toss until the squash and sweet potatoes are evenly coated. Add Kosher salt and pepper to taste, then toss again. Spread the squash and sweet potato pieces out on a large rimmed baking sheet or a casserole baking dish. The pieces should be in one layer and should not touch (to promote even cooking). Roast the squash and sweet potatoes for 30 minutes (they’ll probably be just a touch underdone at this point, but they will finish cooking in the chili). Set the roasted squash and sweet potatoes aside until Step 10.
  2. While the squash and sweet potatoes are roasting, proceed with the recipe: Peel the onion and cut it into dice of ½-inch or so.
  3. Warm a Dutch oven—one that holds 6-quarts or more—over medium stovetop heat (you’ll be using this to cook the chili). When warm, add a tablespoon of olive oil and allow it to heat (it’ll shimmer when hot) and add the diced onion. Season with salt (about ½  teaspoon of Kosher, but your taste may vary), and cook until the onion is translucent and just beginning to brown (5 minutes or so).
  4. While the onion is cooking, peel the garlic and mince it finely (or cut it into thin slices). Set aside.
  5. Now wash the jalapeño peppers (if using) and cut them lengthwise. Use a teaspoon to scoop out the ribs and seeds (be careful, the oil on these is hot; keep fingers away from your eyes). Chop the peppers into very small dice (or use a mini food processor). Place the peppers in a bowl until you’re ready to use them, then wash your hands with soap and water to remove the hot jalapeño oil from your skin. You may want to reserve a slice or two of the pepper for garnish.
  6. When the onion is just starting to brown, add the chopped garlic and jalapeño and cook for a minute or two.
  7. Add all the spices—chile powder(s), cumin, coriander, oregano—to the onion mixture, then stir to combine. Add the canned tomatoes (both diced and crushed), plus one 28-ounce can of water to create a nice soup consistency.
  8. Bring the chili to a simmer and allow it to cook for about an hour (or longer—timing not critical).
  9. While the chili cooks, prepare the kale. Wash the kale and dry it well. Remove the center stems (just pull them out as you would when cleaning spinach). Chop the kale finely: The easiest way to do this is to take several leaves, roll them together lengthwise, then mince. You may want to turn your chopping board 90 degrees and mince again. (See Notes for more discussion; you may want to save a bit of kale for a garnish.) Refrigerate the chopped kale until ready to use (Step 12).
  10. After the chili mixture has been cooking for an hour, add the roast squash and sweet potatoes. Pour the canned beans into a strainer and rinse them well, then add them to the chili.
  11. Taste the chili and adjust seasoning if necessary (this would be a good point to add more chile powder if the mixture is not spicy enough for your taste; you’ll probably also need more salt). Add more water if too much has evaporated during cooking, or if you prefer a chili with a thinner consistency. Set a timer for 20 minutes.
  12. At the 20-minute mark, add the kale to the chili mixture. Cook for another 10 minutes. The chili should now be done. You can hold it over low heat if you’re not ready to serve—or dish it up if you are. Garnish, if you wish, with some reserved kale (see Notes). Or try jalapeño pepper slices, chopped parsley, or chopped cilantro. Oyster crackers are also a nice addition. (See Notes for more garnish options.)
Roast Squash & Sweet Potato Chili with Kale in ramekin

Notes
  • If you don’t want to roast the squash and sweet potatoes, you can cook them in the chili. Clean, peel, and cut the squash and sweet potatoes as directed in Step 1, then add them when the chili has been cooking for half an hour or so.
  • A refresher on the difference between “chile” and “chili” powder: When you dry chile peppers and grind them up, you produce chile powder. Chile powder contains nothing but chilies. By contrast, chili (with an i) powder is a mixture of herbs and spices that includes chile powder as one of its ingredients. Peppers and powders can both be used to flavor the dish called “chili.”
  • You don’t need to use a specific chile powder for this recipe. We use both mild and medium dried Hatch chile powders, as well as chipotle powder. (No need to mix the Hatch powders though; you can use one or the other if you don’t want to buy both.) Ancho chile powder (which is sold in many supermarkets) also has great taste and is fairly mild. If you can’t find chipotle powder, you can substitute cayenne (but use only half as much), or just leave it out. Chipotle powder has a nice smoky flavor that adds an interesting dimension to this dish, but it’s not essential. In any case, don’t stress over the varieties—just buy whatever chile powders your supermarket stocks.
  • This recipe specifies 2 to 4 tablespoons of mild and/or medium chile powder. Using 2 tablespoons produces a batch of chili that we regard as mild in flavor, with just a slight ping of heat to it. But that’s our palates—your taste will differ (in fact, we always use 4 tablespoons because we like spicy). You may know from experience that the quantity of chile powder we call for is too much or too little for you. If you’re concerned about the heat level, start with 1 or 2 tablespoons, then taste the chili after it has been simmering for about 30 minutes. This is a good point to adjust the chile powder level. Don’t wait until the end to adjust, because chile powders need time to simmer in order to develop the full depth of their flavor.
  • You can substitute chili powder for the chile powder(s) in this recipe. If you go that route, use 3 to 5 tablespoons of chili powder. Reduce the cumin, coriander, and oregano by about half, or eliminate them altogether (since these flavors are already incorporated into chili powder). The taste of the finished dish won’t be as crisp if you use chili powder, but you’ll still be pleased with it.
  • You should chop the kale finely because you’ll be cooking it for a relatively brief time (big pieces of kale are not pleasant to eat when they’re raw or lightly cooked). If you don’t want to bother with chopping the pieces so finely, just cook the kale longer—a half hour or so (add it with the beans in Step 10). Note, however, that when kale cooks longer, it loses its bright green color; the hue becomes much more muted.
  • Canned beans are easy to use in this recipe and have acceptable flavor, but make sure you wash off the gunk they’re packed in (Step 10). Dark red kidney beans work best in chili, though we also like pinto beans in this dish (and often mix the two).
  • If you prefer to substitute dried beans for canned (we often do), prepare a pound of dried beans.
  • How to prepare dried beans? The easiest way is the “quick-soak” method: Sort through the beans, looking for dirt or stones; then rinse off the beans and pour them into a 4-quart (or larger) pot. Fill the pot with water to within a couple inches of the rim; place the pot on the stove and bring it to a boil. Boil for two minutes, then turn off the stove and cover the pot; let it sit for an hour. Once the hour is up, drain the beans; then place them in a smaller cooking pot and cover them with about an inch of water. Add a peeled and halved onion and several cloves of garlic (peeled or not) for flavoring, then bring the beans to a simmer. Simmer until they’re tender—typically about an hour to an hour and a half for kidney beans. Drain the beans, then add them to the cooking chili in Step 10.
  • Kosher salt is more coarse than regular table salt, so it’s less salty by volume. If you’re substituting table salt for Kosher, always use less—about half as much. If the dish isn’t salty enough, you can always add more later.
  • If you like thick chili, cook it a bit longer to evaporate more of the liquid. If you prefer a thinner, soupier mix, you can add some water at the end to achieve the consistency you prefer.
  • Are you planning to reserve some kale for garnish? It will have better color if you blanch it in boiling water for 20 seconds or so. After blanching, drain the kale and rinse it under cold water to stop the cooking. This is a very optional step, though—it will work fine if you add the raw kale right before serving.
  • In addition to the garnishes suggested in the ingredients list and in Step 12, you might also consider grated cheddar cheese, a sprinkle of diced raw onion, or a dollop of sour cream or Greek yogurt.
Roast Squash & Sweet Potato Chili with Kale in ramekin

Chili con Corny

Kale surprise,” said Mrs Kitchen Riffs, using her best French accent.

“Yup, it’s chili in here,” I said, dipping a spoon into my bowl.

“But I thought you were roasting,” said Mrs K R.

“I was,” I said. “So I guess we have some real hot potatoes to deal with.”

“Potatoes?” said Mrs K R. “Sweet.”

We need to squash these puns.

You may also enjoy reading about:
Roast Sweet Potatoes
Kale, Quinoa, and White Bean Soup
Chili Basics
Sweet Potato Chili with Black Beans
Meat and Potatoes Chili
Pulled Pork and Green Chile Chili
Chunky Pork and Sweet Potato Chili
Vegetarian Chili
Quinoa and Sweet Potato Chili
Texas Style Chili con Carne
Or check out the index for more recipes

116 comments:

  1. Butternut squash is one of my favorites and combining it with the kale and beans is genius. Plus, it is also beautiful. I slice off both ends, cut the skinny part off, cut both sections in half, scoop out the seeds and use my veggie peeler to peel it which goes fast. Then I cube it.

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    1. Hi Pat, isn't this a nice dish? Terrific flavor combo! Thanks for the comment.

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  2. Squash can be a bit intimidating to slice into. I've seen knives slip dangerously off their hard surface! Slicing the bottom to get a stable base is a great tip. GREG

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    1. Hi Greg, peeling squash can be such a pain, can't it? A sharp knife is a must! Thanks for the comment.

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  3. Squash sounds wonderful in the chili. Perfect fall/winter stew! Bring on some cornbread and I am ready to dig in. Looks delicious!

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    1. Hi Holly, cornbread would be wonderful with this! Thanks for the comment.

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  4. This vegetarian chili would be pretty much perfect anytime of the year! Loving all the spices thrown in with the sweet potatoes and butternut squash!

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    1. Hi Shashi, this is a great dish for any time of the year -- such rich flavor. Thanks for the comment.

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  5. Yes, chili always seems to appeal to everyone! I've been a squash lover since I was a child, when my mom used to buy it in those square frozen box packages. Fresh is so much better and cutting it properly always makes me feel so powerful! I'm weird that way!

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    1. Hi Abbe, I remember those square frozen boxes! Didn't contain a lot of flavor, as I recall, at least compared to fresh squash. Thanks for the comment.

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  6. Tell me about picky eaters --- we have one of every variety known to man at our table! This looks healthy and delicious, I love that big fat jalapeno slice in the middle!

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    1. Hi Sue, the good thing about picky eaters is they make for very creative cooks! Thanks for the comment.

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  7. Good afternoon John, Your "Roast Squash & Sweet Potato Chili with Kale," looks amazing. I am so hungry for a bowl of this wonderful chili right now. I love the ingredients that you use and what a perfect dish for this time of the year. As you said it fits every ones taste buds, including Gluten Free. You always give such detailed instructions, which I love that and your notes are spectacular. Thanks so much for a great post and a fabulous recipe. This is a perfect chili which I am going to try. Thanks for sharing...Have a Happy Thanksgiving with Mrs. Riffs! Dottie :).

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    1. Hi Dottie, this really is a nice chili -- and so suitable for the cold weather we've been having! Thanks for the comment.

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  8. Thanks for posting the recipe! I have all the ingredients with me, all I have to do is soak some kidney beans, I am planning to try this for the weekday dinner.

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    1. Hi Shibi, this is probably the 3rd or 4th chili we've posted with sweet potatoes! Just love them. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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    2. I made these chili with butternut squash and sweet potatoes yesterday and its really awesome, I didn't taste the sweetness of sweet potatoes, they were all flavored with the spices and complimented well with butternut squash. I even packed them for lunch at work. Thanks for sharing this recipe. Its a keeper!!

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    3. Hi Shibi, glad you liked it! The overall taste of this is one of spiciness, I agree. Although when I bite into the potato and squash chunks, I do get a blast of great veggie flavor, too. ;-) Thanks for letting me know you enjoyed this!

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  9. It has all the good, autumnal stuff in plus it is vegan. What a feast for Thanksgiving eve!

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    1. Hi Denise, this recipe really is pure autumn, isn't it? Love it! Thanks for the comment.

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  10. Love all the flavor in your chili, butternut squash and sweet potatoes, sounds perfect!

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    1. Hi Cheri, the squash/sweet potato combo is awesome! Thanks for the comment.

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  11. I love to sneak kale in chilis. Love the spice mix you have working here, too. BTW, I have the green tomato jam simmer as I type this. It smells delicious---all cinnamony and lemony!

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    1. Hi Debra, kale really works in chili. Sound weird, but it does. Hope you enjoy the green tomato jam! Thanks for the comment.

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  12. Just what we need in Colorado. Wonderful combination of flavors and nutrients and comfort.

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    1. Hi Ansh, this is perfect for that really cold weather you've been having! It's been cold here, too, but nothing like what you have. Thanks for the comment.

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  13. Haha, your "conversations" always give me a chuckle. It's definitely chili weather here...and yours is a delicious twist on the classic :)

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    1. Hi Liz, we enjoy those conversations too. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  14. The college student gone vegetarian who poses a tricky problem...hey, that sounds like me! And I know I'd be satisfied with this, so I guess it worked :D

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    1. Hi Ala, :There's one or more in every family! :D And this dish has so much flavor, it makes everyone happy. Thanks for the comment.

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  15. Great Fall flavors especially for this Winter weather, John...I wouldn't change a thing. I like that it freezes OK too because it sure makes a whole lotta chili!

    Thanks for sharing, John...

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    1. Hi Louise, that is a big batch, isn't it? Pretty easy to cut in half, but we never do -- it's always the freezer for us! Thanks for the comment.

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  16. Gotta love the reasoning behind having this dish on hand! Yes, it definitely would satisfy any diet, I would hope. ;) The amount of vitamins in this meal is quite abundant meaning that no side are needed. YAY! Lots of color, texture and just downright goodness. Nice recipe John!

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    1. Hi MJ, definitely a dish to feed multiple tastes. ;-) And I love the color and texture of this, although the flavor is even better! Thanks for the comment.

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  17. Love how hearty this is. This is the kind of dish I love to have stashed away in my freezer!

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    1. Hi Alyssa, this is great freezer fare -- particularly with all the cold weather we're getting (that you're probably escaping!). Thanks for the comment.

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  18. This looks and sounds delicious!

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    1. Hi Linda, it's really good stuff! Thanks for the comment.

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  19. I would eat and feed my dear ones this red-hot, sexy Chili throughout the year. And I bet, all of them would be smacking their lips in public shamelessly :) Totally, truly, madly in love with your BEAUTIFUL chili, dear John :)
    Eye-popping pictures! Awesome recipe!

    www.myselfnusrst.wordpress.com

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    1. HI Nusrat, well, we smack our lips in public after/while eating this. Shamelessly. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  20. Ok just before I start raving about how delicious the food looks, we have the same white bowls :D :D
    Ahaha now back to this chili - it is so thick and rich and healthy at the same time!

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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    1. Hi Uru, those little bowls are fun, aren't they? And yes, this is healthy and incredibly flavorful. Really good stuff! ;-) Thanks for your comment.

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  21. Dynamic flavourful bowl of chilli, especially for those picky eaters that all convene the day before. You could make it in advance and just reheat. Great idea!

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    1. Hi Bam, isn't this nice? And you're right -- making it ahead and reheating would work quite well! Thanks for the comment.

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  22. This is an awesome chili! I love all the healthy stuff in it with the spices.

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    1. Hi Amy, this really is healthy. And good. Dangerous combo -- easy to eat way too much! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  23. We have fallen into the habit of ordering Chinese takeout as I am usually busy in the kitchen the day before and its flavors are so different than traditional TG menu. Fantastic idea to plan the evening meal before Thanksgiving and simplicity is best. Roasted squash and sweet potato chili is a winner. :)

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    1. Hi Judy, Chinese takeout is always a great idea! We've never done it before Thanksgiving, but maybe should give it a try. Or make this chili. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  24. It looks hearty, healthy, and delicious!

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    1. Hi Pam, yes, yes, and yes! Really good stuff. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  25. A tasty and comforting chili! I love the ingredients you have used to make it.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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    1. Hi Rosa, aren't those ingredients nice? Really a fun dish! Thanks for the comment.

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  26. Two things I know about your blog:
    1. I will learn something new every week (chili vs chile powder? I had no idea).
    2. Your horrible puns will make me groan. (Kale surprise? Really?)
    Fortunately, I love horrible puns. And good food. Another great post, John.

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    1. Hi Beth, bad puns are fun! But awfully bad, nevertheless. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  27. This is right up my alley! I don't have any food restrictions, but I favor delicious and flavorful vegetarian food. A sprinkle of cheese or a dollop of sour cream would taste great on this colorful chili. --Rocquie

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    1. Hi Rocquie, we eat everything. ;-) And this dish seems to have everything in it! Thanks for the comment.

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  28. You're crazy and that is a most adorable trait. Apparently your wife thinks so too----so that's even better! Good thinking about the guests coming in early and making is vegan, but not sacrificing taste and hardiness. Gorgeous looking colors too.

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    1. Hi Carol, crazed I am, definitely. ;-) It seems to work out OK, though! Thanks for the comment.

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  29. This sounds great, ideal for the colder weather!

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    1. Hi Caroline, it really is a good dish! Good thing, because it's been cold here, and we've been eating a lot of it. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  30. Hi John, your chili is pretty (love the colors), healthy (such great ingredients) and sounds super delicous (love all the great spices and spices)

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    1. Hi Scott, I'm a sucker for pretty food! Thanks for the comment.

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  31. Hi John , this chili is amazing , as you know we eat chili year round and this one we'll have Saturday . not cooking yet , but hubby and my mother's helper should be able to handle it .
    John thanks for the well wishes and yes I was whiskey medicinal time . Hubby aunt told him if the still make 'Old Crow ' my head would be nodding off after the second drink . Still a tad weak , but I am Back . (smiling) ~~Nee~~

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    1. Hi Nee, wow, you've had the flu for quite awhile! Glad to hear you're getting a bit better. I haven't had Old Crow bourbon in years! Worth a shot to help you get better. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  32. YES YES YES! THIS is calling my name! Actually, you just motivated me to get off my BUTT and get to the kitchen to make squash!

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    1. Hi GiGi, yup, this is a dish I think you'd like. I know I sure do! Thanks for the comment.

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  33. I bet this would be fabulous with my fave kabocha squash. What a comforting dish with just enough spice to perk up the palate on a cold night.

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    1. Hi Carolyn, I haven't tried this with kabocha squash, but I like that idea! I think it'd be great. Thanks for the comment.

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  34. One look at this and I think I might need to move in. This chili really hits my hot button. Perfect for a cold night and would warm the chilliest heart. :)

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    1. HI Maureen, you're more than welcome! :-) This really is good stuff -- tons of flavor. Thanks for the comment.

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  35. I know so many college students who go vegetarian. They do that and grow facial hair. We don't celebrate Thanksgiving in Oz (sadly) but I agree a special meal that's easy to prepare and suits even the most picky of eaters is the way to go. This is a very lovely looking vegan chilli that's packed with flavour xx

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    1. Hi Charlie, your uni students would love this! And you would, too. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  36. Strange, I've never imagined sweet potato in a savory dish!!. In the middle east we consider sweet potato to be a dessert and go in dessert dishes only. It is time for this concept to change - at least for me- and I should start eating sweet potato in savory dishes:). Thanks for the recipe, the simplicity of this dish makes is so tempting to try.

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    1. Hi Amira, years ago when I lived in Morocco I was once served a beef tagine that had sweet potatoes in it. That got me hooked on using sweet potatoes in savory dishes! Their taste really works in savory fare. Thanks for the comment.

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  37. All natural, tasty and with a lovely chili touch.
    Great choice of ingredients and lovely pictures.
    Thanks for a great autumn treat inspiration !

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    1. Hi Daniela, this is such a tasty dish! I love it. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  38. I was just thinking about making chili! Yours looks exceptionally good!

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    1. Hi Cathleen, this is pretty good chili! Worth making. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  39. Oh John, I so wish for a bowl of this chili...I need to learn more about making chili with more ingredients...and you sure have the right touch for it...I like the idea of roasted squash and sweet potato...so comforting!
    Have a great weekend :)

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    1. Hi Juliana, chili is a lot like soup -- once you figure out your basic procedure and spicing, anything is possible. Whether that's a good thing is of course debatable, but it's fun experimenting! Thanks for the comment.

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  40. This is my kind of soup. Full of flavor and nutrition. Great recipe!!!

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    1. Hi Vicki, our kind of dish, too! Love the flavor of this. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  41. Such a perfect winter dinner! Very nice for Thanksgiving eve as you note, with all those traditional Thanksgiving flavors kicked up a little. Really like the idea of cooking the squash and potato in the chili.

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    1. Hi Laura, aren't the Thanksgiving flavors in this fun? Really a nice dish -- very tasty. Thanks for the comment.

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  42. yay! love using all sorts of squash and sweet potatoes in chili this time of year: they're so good, and they hold up well against traditional chili flavors, in my opinion. a nice vegetarian option when you don't want to mess with meat. am i the only one who gets that way? maybe. :)

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    1. Hi Shannon, although we love a good meat chili, veggie chili might be our favorite -- particularly when sweet potatoes are involved in some form. They can be so good! Thanks for the comment.

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  43. This gorgeous dish is a winner hands down....such delectable flavors,burst of warm colors and yum roasted squash....a definite crowd pleaser...this is sure going to make its place on our table for our vegan friends...and we can have bowls of this stew with a smile,thanks for sharing this beautiful recipe :-)

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    1. Hi Kumar, this really is so nice -- terrific flavor! And you can add more chilies to make it as hot as you want. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  44. And that's why I moved away from my extended family! Thankfully, they don't come here for Thanksgiving:)
    This chilli looks great, John. I love all the flavourings, nice and bold.
    Can you imagine if we had Thanksgiving with all our blogger friends? I think we should do that one year. Have a great Thanksgiving John!

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    1. Hi Nazneen, family gatherings can be interesting, can' they? :-) A Thanksgiving with blogger friends would be awesome! Thanks for your comment.

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  45. This vegan dish surely packs a flavour even meat lovers like me would not notice theres no animal in this :)

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    1. Hi Raymund, no animal needed in this dish! ;-) Tons of flavor. Thanks for the comment.

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  46. It's become so difficult to please guests with food no? That one is diabetic, another one doesn't eat eggs and so on.
    I am just going through a nasty cold and I could need a bowl full of your warming roast squash sweet potato chili. I would be in heaven right now! Maybe you can come over John and bring your chili, that would be so helpful.
    Take care and have a nice weekend!

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    1. Hi Helene, I'd be delighted to come over! Always wanted to visit India, and you live in one of the most attractive spots! Hope your cold gets better soon! Thanks for the comment.

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  47. I could really use an easy recipe like this for Thanksgiving Eve - I never know what to make for everyone!

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    1. Hi Ashley, easy recipes rock, don't they? And this one has great flavor as a bonus! Thanks for the comment.

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  48. Your chili looks delicious and would be perfect for a chilly snowy day like today. It has to be great with all those good ingredients and a hit, for sure when served. Thanks for the recipe.

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    1. Hi Pam, it's chilly here today, too, so that means it must be chili weather! Thanks for the comment.

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  49. Having previously confessed my non-love for winter squash, I am saving this. Husband and son love it. And I am hosting 40-50 people for Christmas Eve, which includes people with: celiac, some scary allergies, vegan and vegetarian. So I cover all the bases. I may be in the wrong ballpark as to winter squash but but I do love bad puns. Think you married the write woman.

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    1. Hi Claudia, I definitely married the write woman! :-) We love bad puns around here. And chili. Thanks for the comment.

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  50. My family loves soups and stews. This one really sounds like good warm comfort food. I'm looking forward to trying it out!

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    1. Hi Mireya, we're big on soups and stews, too, particularly when the weather turns chilly. Which it has, big time. Thanks for the comment.

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  51. OMG! This dish just made my mouth water! sooo yummy!

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    1. Hi Marcela, it makes my mouth water too! Really delish. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  52. Great Thanksgiving addition :) Happy Thanksgiving, John!

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    1. Hi Kristi, isn't this nice? And sooo tasty. ;-) Happy Thanksgiving, and thanks for the comment.

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  53. But does your recipe conform to the 'Blood Type Diet' (ha ha)! I love butternut squash and use it to make my pumpkin pies- much easier to work with than those big ol' pumpkins!

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    1. Hi Fran, :-) Missed that one! Darn. We've not done a butternut squash pie -- will have to try it. We often do sweet potato pie instead of pumpkin -- awesome flavor. Thanks for the comment.

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  54. Vegan or not, I just think this is a fabulous recipe and a great excuse to serve something healthier than I've been serving lately. Plus squash and sweet potato? Has my name written all over it! And chili? Yeah.... Stunning!

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    1. Hi Jamie, although we're big meat eaters, many of our meals are vegan/vegetarian, simply because you can make so many tasty and interesting dishes. And this one is a goodie! Thanks for your comment.

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  55. This is one serious chili......meat free and I still want to dive in and do a face plant in it!! It looks so satisfying - and the flavours, wow, you've got all the essentials right in there!! This is fabulous, I have to share this with the Vegan community, they will go NUTS over this!!

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    1. Hi Nagi, this really is good stuff -- the flavor is so good, you really don't even notice it doesn't contain meat! Thanks for the comment.

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  56. No sweet potatoes this year but I no longer think of them just for Thanksgiving so I look forward to trying this sometime this winter. Sounds warming and wonderful John.

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    1. Hi Barb, we used to be the same way -- sweet potatoes appeared only on our table at Thanksgiving. Now we use them throughout the year! They're so good. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  57. The fun thing about chili is that you can put just about anything in it. It's almost like a blank slate! I'm really loving your winter squash version and the addition of sweet potatoes is perfect. Great winter time recipe. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Hi Bill, you're so right that you can treat this recipe more or less like a blank slate. Once you've developed a good combo of chile powders and seasonings, almost anything goes! Thanks for the comment.

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