Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Homemade Deviled Ham

Homemade Deviled Ham

Leftover ham gets a spicy re-do for sandwiches and canapés

Got a big ol’ ham left over from Easter? Wondering what to do with it? Meet deviled ham—your new best friend.

It’s basically spicy ham salad (often with mustard-forward flavor) that’s been ground to a paste in the food processor. It makes a great spread for sandwiches, crackers, or whatever.

Deviled ham is an old-fashioned treat that many of us have forgotten. Too bad, because it has great flavor. Plus, it takes just minutes to make, so it’s easy for you.  And once people taste it, their smiles (and praise!) will come easily too.



Homemade Deviled Ham

Recipe: Homemade Deviled Ham

Back in the 1950s and 60s, deviled ham was popular picnic fare. Then, however, people tended to use the canned version produced by the William Underwood Company. You know, the one wrapped in white paper with that cute red devil on the label. You can still find it on the “canned meats” shelf at your supermarket. But why go that route when you can make a better version in your own home kitchen? Besides, it’s nice to know what’s in your food, isn’t it?

This recipe for deviled ham is pretty flexible. It’s easy to add, subtract, or substitute ingredients to suit your own taste, and I’ll discuss some suggestions for doing so in the Notes.

This recipe takes about 5 minutes to make and yields about 2 cups of spread. It’s easy to halve or double the recipe. Leftovers keep for a few days if stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Ingredients
  • 1 pound cooked ham cut into ½-inch dice (about 2½ cups)
  • ¼ cup chopped onion (optional; I use this when making canapés, but skip it when making sandwich spread—see Notes)
  • ~½ cup mayonaise (preferably Homemade)
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard (to taste; may substitute brown mustard, Creole mustard, or another variety)
  • 1 teaspoon Tabasco (or to taste)
  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric
  • garnish of your choice (optional; see Notes for suggestions)
Procedure
  1. Cut the cooked ham into dice of about ½ inch. If using onion, peel and roughly chop it. Place both the ham and the onion into the bowl of a food processor, and process until the ham is finely ground.
  2. Add the mayo, mustard, Tabasco, and turmeric. Pulse in the food processor until well combined.
  3. You can use deviled ham immediately to make sandwiches or canapés (see Notes). But I prefer to let the flavor develop for half an hour or so in the refrigerator (just store it in an airtight container). When ready to serve, add the garnish of your choice, if desired.
Homemade Deviled Ham

Notes
  • Onion or no? When I’m making deviled ham for sandwiches, I leave it out, and then add slices of red onion at table. When making deviled ham for canapés (or using it as a dip), I like to mix onion in. But you may prefer otherwise.
  • I usually make this recipe with 4 tablespoons of mustard. But that's a pretty strong mustard flavor. If in doubt, start with half that, and taste. It's easy enough to add more.
  • For sandwiches, I like to spread deviled ham on crusty bread, then add sliced onion, some lettuce, and maybe some pickle chips or sliced olives.
  • For canapés, I often spread a bit of deviled ham on crackers or slices of party rye, then garnish them with a squirt of sriracha sauce and maybe some chives (as shown in the photos).
  • Lots of other garnishes work well too. Sliced olives, sweet pickle relish, pickle chips, chopped parsley,  pimento—your imagination is the limit.
  • For an interesting twist on deviled eggs, fill the hard-boiled egg halves with deviled ham rather than the usual egg-yolk mixture.
  • It’s easy to change up ingredients in this recipe. For instance, you could reduce the amount of mustard, and add some curry powder. Or even eliminate the mustard altogether and substitute sweet pickle relish. You might want to add some chopped pickle slices. Or some spicy jalapeño peppers, finely minced. How about adding a chutney of some sort? Or perhaps Worcestershire sauce and/or horseradish? I’ve even heard of people adding chopped peanuts to deviled ham (though that’s an idea I haven’t tried).
  • The William Underwood Company, which was founded in 1822, packed a variety of condiments, fruits, and vegetables. They originally packed food in glassware, but by 1836 they switched to steel cans to keep up with demand. During the Civil War, Underwood supplied canned food to Union troops.
  • Underwood developed deviled ham in 1868. Although the company expanded its line to include other meats and seafoods, deviled ham became its best-known product. The red devil first appeared on their labels in 1895, and soon became an iconic logo.
Homemade Deviled Ham

Picnic Daze

“Wow, this reminds me of childhood picnics,” said Mrs. Kitchen Riffs, biting into her deviled ham sandwich.

“Same here,” I said. “Although my mom never made this—she always bought the canned version with the red devil on the package.”

“Yeah, I think most everybody did,” said Mrs K R. “Processed food seemed like such a convenience then.”

“That was way before food processors were available,” I said. “So deviled ham would have been a chore to make.”

“And with the canned stuff, you didn’t have to worry about the ham spoiling if you were out in the woods somewhere without refrigeration,” said Mrs K R. “You could just open the can and be sure it was safe to eat.”

“True, that was before those freezer pack thingies were invented,” I said. “So keeping things cold was a problem.”

“Glad we can make our own homemade deviled ham sandwiches these days,” said Mrs K R. “On our own homemade bread.”

“Yes, we should pack some of these sandwiches in a hamper and go on a picnic,” I said. “Our homemade goodies will be so much better than commercially processed ham on cardboard white bread.”

“Great idea,” said Mrs K R. “Back to nature courtesy of Cuisinart and freezer gel packs.”

“Not to mention insect repellent and GPS,” I added.

Henry David Thoreau, you're our lodestar.

You may also enjoy reading about:
Homemade Mayonnaise
No-Knead Homemade Bread
Crab Rangoon Dip
California Clam Dip
Smoky Salmon and Cream Cheese Dip
Candied Bacon
Pimento Cheese
Or check out the index for more

134 comments:

Karen Harris said...

I love deviled ham. This is definitely a good reason to buy a big old ham at the holidays. Right after deviled ham salad it is definitely ham and beans. Thanks for your recipe.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Karen, I love making deviled ham! Great flavor, and a fun way to dress up leftovers. Thanks for the comment.

Anonymous said...

we loved this spiced,zingy version of ham....such a delectable way to have canapes and sandwiches....love the burst of scrumptious flavors in every bite of it,thanks so much for sharing :-)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Kumar, isn't spicy stuff so good? And this is a terrific recipe, if I may say so. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

kristy @ the wicked noodle said...

But I've already eaten all of my ham!! Cause to make another, I suppose. I put a mango-habanero glaze on mine which would have made a delicious deviled ham. Yours sounds delicious, too!

Dahn said...

Fabulous idea for leftover ham, I love how you think. This sounds better than the ham itself ;)

Liz Berg said...

I didn't grow up with deviled ham, either, but my hubby did. His mom will still make it from scratch. I need to treat Bill to a batch of this...especially since I'm getting tired of the ham leftovers!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Kristy, I need some of that mango-haberno glaze! Sounds terrific! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Dahn, isn't this nice? In some ways it really is better than the ham! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Liz, a ham goes a long way, doesn't it? Good thing this recipe exists to help out with that! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Suzanne Perazzini said...

What a great idea. I am always looking for finger food like this. Love that last photo!

Nee said...

Hi John , what a delicious recipe , school will be out soon and that's reason enough to make a batch of devil ham , the kids can make their own lunch , they love to picnic outside , thanks for sharing :)
PS: my potatoes was a hit and Jonny gave 6 guests your blog address .;-D

Eva Taylor said...

I must say I've never had deviled ham, ever! It does look like an interesting combination of flavours but I'm not so sure I would like the texture (although I do enjoy pâte).
By the way, I was inspired by your scalloped potato and celeriac and made something similar for Easter Sunday, the post will go live tomorrow, I hope you can drop by.
Eva http://kitcheninspirations.wordpress.com

Hotly Spiced said...

I don't think I've ever had devilled ham! I usually do buy a ham at Easter but I didn't this year - will make up for that on Mother's Day. This is such a good idea for using up leftover cooked ham and I love how it has dijon mustard and tobasco in it - great flavours! I can imagine this is very moreish and it wouldn't be too difficult to polish off the lot in one sitting xx

GoumetGetaways said...

Oh WOW!!
I am only just old enough to remember devilled ham and I have never made it!! I am going to have to try it out for myself!
Thanks for sharing
Julie

Maureen | Orgasmic Chef said...

I remember that first deviled ham. I'm older than you are but I think we share a generation. :) It was before food processors and my mother used the old meat grinder that she clamped to the kitchen table.

I love this stuff and haven't made it in years.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Suzanne, that last photo is my favorite of this set. And this is such great finger food! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Nee, glad the potatoes were a hit, and LOL at your Jonny! ;-) This is really great picnic stuff -- I love it! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Eva, glad I inspired you, and I'll definitely be stopping by! If you like pate, you might like this -- although I could see how some might not like the texture. Good stuff, though. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Charlie, you can definitely polish off the lot of this in one sitting. It's that good. Or bad. ;-) Maybe it's just that I'm that bad when I make it? :D Anyway, this is so worth trying -- I think you'd like it. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Julie, this is incredibly good stuff. And I can't believe how long it's been since I've made it! I'll be making it again, and soon. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Maureen, I used to own one of those hand crank meat grinders that you clamped to the table! And my mother did, too. Although our deviled ham always came out of the can with the devil. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

mjskit said...

Like a "few" of us here, I do remember that little red devil. :) My mother used it for picnics like you mentioned, as well as quick lunches. To be honest, it has been so long, I don't remember what it tasted like, so apparently it didn't much of a positive nor negative effect. As a result of that, now I'm curious. I do have some leftover ham from Sunday's dinner, so now I know what to with some of it. Also have some of those crackers leftover from the appetizer so this must be an omen. :) Thanks for sharing such an easy recipe that uses leftovers. Those are the best!

Ansh said...

I love old fashioned treats. I don't think I had heard of deviled heard of ham until today. Love the idea of a spicy makeover. Excellent post.

Debra Eliotseats said...

I used to beg my mom to by canned deviled ham! I was a weird little kid! :) I have that Easter ham languish in the fridge too. Deviled ham it is for tomorrow's dinner. (After ham and asparagus pasta, reheated slabs, and regular old ham sandwiches we are ready for a change.)

Carolyn Jung said...

I haven't had this since I was a kid. And even then, it was from a can! This looks so much better, I can't even tell you. ;)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi MJ, I don't really recommend the commercial version -- basically all you taste is salt. I have good memories of it, but they're memories of my youth. I tried it again when I wrote this post, and bleh! My version, though, is really good! And it's really one of those dishes that you can adjust to your own taste. I suspect green chiles might make their way into yours! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Ansh, this is really a fun recipe to play with -- so many different flavor combos possible. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Debra, leftover ham can last, can't it? So this is a great recipe to have on hand! You'll enjoy this, I think. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Carolyn, I don't know who buys the commercial deviled ham these days, although someone obviously does. Homemade really is good -- and fun! -- stuff. Thanks for the comment.

Denise Browning@From Brazil To You said...

This is a versatile recipe since can be served as a topping for crackers and toasts. Great photos, John!

thelady8home said...

This is a fun recipe! I think canned food killed a lot of opportunities for an entire generation of kids to appreciate home cooked food. I have never heard of it, but ham and tobasco and turmeric? Can I have some please?

Pat said...

What a great idea with left-over ham, John. I remember the old-fashioned canned variety and I know this is a huge improvement. Thanks, :)

Sage Trifle said...

One of my husband's childhood favorites, he will still buy a can of that stuff from time to time. I have always been suspicious of it and therefore shunned it. I never thought of making it. Thanks for the great idea; I'm going to try it the next time we have leftover ham. --Rocquie

Guru Uru said...

What a delicious ham recipe, it is so full of nostalgic recipes for my dad! :D

Cheers
Choc Chip Uru

Holly | Beyond kimchee said...

I actually never tried deviled ham, but I can imagine the taste and how good it will be on the crackers. Yum! Perfect for picnic as you mentioned.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Denise, what I like about this recipe is both the different ways you can use it, and how you can mix things up in terms of ingredients/flavors. Really versatile stuff! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Minnie, this is really good stuff! I liked the canned when I was a kid, but I didn't know better. Homemade really rocks! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Pat, this really is a step up (OK several steps up) over the canned. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Juliana said...

Such a great idea to use the leftover ham...it looks delicious John. Thank you so much for the inspiration...hope you are enjoying your week :D

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Rocquie, your husband will so love it if you make some of this! And you can open his eyes to some different flavor combos. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Uru, you should probably make this for your dad. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Holly, this is definitely worth making (buying the canned? Not so much!). Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Juliana, isn't this nice? Such a great way to use ham! Thanks for the comment.

Anonymous said...

Your timing couldn't have been better, John. No matter what I serve or am served for Easter, I always cook a ham this time of year. For me, it's all about the leftovers: sandwiches, ham & eggs, and split pea soup made with the bone. Well, I've made enough sandwiches, eaten more than enough hearty breakfasts, and stored plenty of ham for my soup. Yet, I've plenty of ham left. I see deviled ham in my future, maybe a soon as tomorrow's lunch. Dad didn't care for ham so it was rarely served, meaning no deviled ham either. Not anymore. Kitchen Riffs to the rescue! Thanks, John, for sharing another great recipe, I will certainly come back to let you know how it goes.

Rosa's Yummy Yums said...

A great idea and perfect with crackers!

Cheers,

Rosa

vanillasugarblog said...

Is that not the best idea for leftover ham?
Brilliant.
I will eat deviled ham when it's made the right way, not with that processed stuff.
Nicely done!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi John, one of the best things about ham is all the ways you can use leftover ham! In fact we sometimes serve ham just for the leftovers. Deviled ham is one of the more interesting leftovers, IMO. Hope you enjoy! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Rosa, isn't this nice? It's good on sandwiches, but I think best on crackers. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Dawn, when I was a kid I loved the canned stuff. Tasted it recently, and threw out most of the can -- it tastes primarily of salt. Homemade, on the other hand, is really good stuff! Thanks for the comment.

CQUEK said...

Gosh,I am starving right now....this would be so tasty with a coffee.....ooh

Judit + Corina @WineDineDaily said...

What a nice idea for a spread and we can picture it on a sandwich for lunch right now! J+C

Mireya @myhealthyeatinghabits said...

My grandmother used to make deviled ham. Your right it is easy to make and would make a great appetizer at any party. It's so much better when you can do something from scratch, too.

Alyssa (Everyday Maven) said...

We have a lot of ham leftover. I have never had (or heard of!) Deviled Ham - this sounds so good. I want to stuff hard-boiled eggs with it.

Amira said...

Haven't heard of it before... only the egg version. Very clever idea for any leftover meat... I always have leftover chicken and this is a kid and adult friendly recipe:). I will try it for sure. I'm always reluctant to making my own mayonnaise because of the raw eggs included but your tip is very useful. Thanks.

Laura Dembowski said...

I've never heard of deviled ham, but it sounds like a tasty way to use up a bunch of leftover ham.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Candy, this makes a great snack! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Judit + Corina, isn't this nice? I like it both in sandwiches and as a spread. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Mireya, great that your grandmother used to make this! Homemade is so good, isn't it? Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Alyssa, it's pretty easy to have a lot (too much!) leftover ham, isn't it? This is such a great use for it! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Amira, you can probably devil almost anything! I haven't tried deviled chicken, but I'll bet it would be great. Wait until you taste your own mayo -- it's so good! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Laura, deviled ham is such good stuff! Definitely worth trying sometime, IMO. Thanks for the comment.

Carol at Wild Goose Tea said...

John, I tuned in today to see what you would tantalize me with. How perfect. I work. I bring lunch to work. I eat at my desk without taking a lunch hour. Sooooo having something a easy, but a little special is wonderful. I like the surprise touch of tobacco and turmeric in this mix. Very nice.

Vicki Bensinger said...

I've never had deviled ham before but it sure does sound good. I love that photo on the white background with the crackers. You're so good.

Sorry for not stopping by in a while. Something is wrong with something and I'm not getting the emails I signed up to receive from everyone's blog. I'm not sure what's going on but hope to figure it out soon.

Beth said...

I smile every time I read your blog. Love the Thoreau reference!
I don't remember deviled ham, but it does sound like the kind of food that was popular in the 50s and 60s. Your version looks terrific.

Just a Smidgen said...

Now these bring back such wonderful memories, they were one of my favorite canapes growing up! My mom would run the ham through a meat mincer. I vaguely recall it was a steel machine, not like the kitchenaid attachments we can use now. I think it hand cranked as well. Nonetheless, we'd have pickle or relish added and make it a fine sandwich! Well, now I'm craving one of those!

~~louise~~ said...

Hi John!
Oh yes, I do remember those deviled ham cans from Underwood. I just can't remember if they were the ones with the funny "key" that you had to use to unravel the can open. I must be thinking of something else. We never had deviled ham in our house. My father was against any kind of processed foods. We rarely had cake mixes even:)

Here in PA they make what most call ham salad. I tried making my own but found myself actually making deviled ham because when I put the ham in the food processor, it was so fine it just begged to be deviled! I, however, did not add Tumeric or Tabasco. I do like a bit of onion juice in mine, just a drop or two and a squirt of lemon juice just to hedge out the saltiness. Marion loves it with relish but she has to add it on her own. I don't relish the stuff:)

I don't see a ham in the near future at out dinner table but, when I do, I will definitely be coming back to this recipe to make sure I got the good stuff! Thank you so much for sharing this recipe John. Naturally I am now craving some crackers spread with devilled ham, which would go great while watching Elementary my very best favorite show:)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Carol, this is perfect for lunch! And the Tabasco and turmeric provide a nice little zing. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hii VIcki, this is really worth trying sometime when you have leftover ham -- something different. Odd that you aren't getting email notifications of new posts. That happens to me sometimes -- I just sign up again. Although sometimes I end up getting duplicate emails! The internet can be weird sometimes, can't it? Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Beth, your own deviled ham is pretty good stuff (much better than the commercial). Worth trying if you ever have too much leftover ham on hand. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Barbara, it was probably a hand crank grinder -- my mom had one of those, two. Sorry about that craving thing. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Louise, I remember those special keys! It's possible deviled ham had one at one type (that sounds vaguely familiar). I'm pretty sure SPAM had them (and one of these days I really need to do a SPAM recipe -- it's a good one, I promise!). Love the idea of adding a bit of lemon juice -- I need to try that. Thanks for the comment.

Shashi Charles said...

I am new to deviled ham (I am learning about it right here) - but it sounds pretty fantastic - like a ham pate. Having it on hard boiled eggs or with curry powder is BRILLIANT!
Thanks for sharing this recipe!

Karen (Back Road Journal) said...

The end of your post had me laughing so hard but it is so true. Deviled ham in the can was a convenience item then like the Cuisinart and GPS are now. Your homemade deviled ham sounds great! I think the key that Louise spoke of was for canned corned beef. My mother used to make a spread similar to this recipe with corned beef and there was a special key to open the can attached to it.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Shashi, deviled ham has kind of fallen out of favor -- used to be much more popular. But it's so good, and so easy to play with flavors when you make it. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Karen, things have changed since Thoreau's time, haven't they? ;-) I think that key was on several different canned products. I do remember it, and I don't think my mom often (or ever) bought canned corned beef. I'm interested now, so I should do some research! Thanks for the comment.

Nazneen Hamilton said...

I am familiar with devilled ham, but of course, have never tried it, and probably won't. I could try it with another meat because honestly, what meat doesn't love mustard, turmeric and Tabasco? And homemade mayo to boot. I'm in!

Dan from Platter Talk said...

This looks wonderful. My mom use to make something like this when I was growing up and your post has just jogged my memory, letting me know I need to try it. Well done!

Mary Frances said...

I've had the kind with the red devil on the label before, and I can't say it was a pleasant experience, but your version sounds really good! Straight-forward, simple ingredients.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Nazneen, you could easily use this method with another type of meat -- it'd be pretty good, I think. Chicken or beef would be my choice, but really anything should work. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Dan, glad to job your memory! This is one of those dishes most of us haven't had for quite some time. Or at least I hadn't! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Mary, the red devil one is really salty, isn't it? This is quite good, though -- really worth trying. Thanks for the comment.

Sippity Sup said...

There are no foods that I refuse to eat. But ham comes close. I thank you for dressing it up in this devilish way. It's just the right disguise to get me on board with a bite. GREG

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Greg, I like ham -- particularly country ham -- but I do know people who don't. But few of them refuse deviled ham! It's almost a whole new thing. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Rosita Vargas said...

hola,una idea maravillosa que rico e irresistible,abrazos

Kim Bee said...

I totally have to try this. Hubs loves deviled ham but I've never tried to make it.

Here's to deviled ham and GPS.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Rosita, isn't this so nice? Such a fun change! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Kim, you do have to try this. You'll do it for Hubs, but you'll come back and do it again for yourself. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

CQUEK said...

I bet it those treats were very tasty too.

Mother Rimmy said...

This is in my recipe box for the next time we have the abundance of leftover ham we usually have over the holidays. What a nice change from using it up in split pea soup!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Candy, very tasty! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Kristi, it's hard to beat split pea soup, but this really is a nice change. Thanks for the comment.

Lea Ann (Cooking On The Ranch) said...

This brings back so many memories for me. My mom made it all the time and I tried to recreate it a couple weeks ago and it wasn't quite right. Pinning this to try soon. Thanks for the post.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Lea Ann, isn't this good stuff? This is one of those recipes that you may have to mess with a bit to get exactly the right mix of stuff to suit your taste buds. Although I think my recipe is pretty darn good! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Terra said...

I used to enjoy deviled ham growing up, my Grandparents made it....I loved it!!! What a fun recipe, brings back memories:-) I have only seen deviled ham at the Honey Baked Ham store. So definitely still a special classic recipe! Yum, take care, Terra

Bill said...

I remember the canned variety of deviled ham well. I'm sure I ate a lot of it as a child. I'm not sure I would go near that today, but I really love the idea of making my own. I'm definitely in the "add onion" camp. Looks delicious, John. Great post!

sprinklesandsauce said...

we really gotta try deviled eggs!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Terra, isn't this fun? I love trips down memory lane! Particularly delish ones like this. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Bill, I loved the canned stuff when I was a kid. Now? Yeech! This is so much better. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Sarah & Arkadi, this makes such a nice filling for deviled eggs! Or as a spread. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Ashley @ Wishes and Dishes said...

I used up all my ham right away but would make another one just to be able to try this!

Bam's Kitchen said...

I have not had deviled ham since living at home and just had the strangest flashback. Could it be possible that my mom added little gerkins or something in there too? Well, it does not matter as I love the ingredients on your list and the perfect sandwich. I agree on leaving out the onions out as raw onions when they have a chance to mingle with the other things sometimes can overpower a dish. On the side for me too. Have a super weekend. Take Care, BAM

Madonna/aka/Ms Lemon of Make Mine Lemon said...

It has to be homemade for me. And yes on the Cusinart and GPS. :)

Madonna
MakeMineLemon

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Ashley, this is so good it really is worth making a ham just so you have leftovers to make this! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Bam, I think gerkins/pickles/relish are a pretty popular ingredient in this, so I'll bet your mom did. I sometimes add them too, although it's not part of my basic recipe. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Madonna, homemade all the way for us! Made in our Cuisinart. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Peachy @ The Peach Kitchen said...

Deviled ham is so new to me but you gave me an idea on what I could do when there's leftover ham. Thank you so much for sharing this.

Indrė said...

I just love all kind of homemade spreads. They are great and makes a difference for daily breakfasts.

Vicki Bensinger said...

Can't sleep because of all the rain and decided to check the lat email I got from you. It appears it was on April 2nd. So now I've got a place to start looking for issues.

Jayanthy Kumaran said...

yummmy n inviting

Asmita said...

Super idea! Looks fantastic!!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Peachy, isn't this a fun recipe? Definitely worth exploring! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Indrė, spreads can have so much flavor, can't they? This is a really good -- and versatile! -- one. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Jayanthy, it is, it is. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Asmita, isn't this nice? Loads of flavor, which is irresistible. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi VIcki, that is so weird! Maybe they're going into your spam folder? If you're getting emails from other places, maybe you somehow got unsubscribed to mine. Hope you figure out what's wrong -- email problems can be so frustrating.

Simones Kitchen said...

I don't think we knew deviled ham back in the day here... We had a horrible regular ham in a can, but I don't recall anything deviled (but than again my mum wasn't very adventurous..:)) It looks totally delicious and I'll create some leftover ham just for that!

Chris Scheuer said...

My mother-in-law always made deviled ham but I forgot all about it. Thanks for the reminder and the recipe John!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Simone, deviled ham might be more of a US thing, although my impression is it's also a British dish (may be wrong about that, though). This is definitely worth trying if you have any extra ham -- nice and zingy! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Chris, this really is a rather old-timey dish. And a good one! Enjoy. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Amy (Savory Moments) said...

This is so funny. I hadn't thought of deviled ham (or ham spread as my husband calls it) in years! Then we recently had a huge ham and I made some for the first time ever. I used some relish in mine, but I like your flavorings. It's definitely an old-time dish that I really only ever saw at my husband's grandmother's house.

Abbe@This is How I Cook said...

Manservant used to take those cans camping, back in the day. He also packed cans of baked beans when he didn't worry about weight in his pack. I must admit that I have never been a ham lover and therefore have never tried this. I however, am easily convinced when the word spread is added to anything. So if ham spread and crackers it is, please count me in!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Amy, great minds, and all of that. ;-) I sometimes put relish or pickles in mine. Really, it's one of those things I make a bit different every time I make it! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Abbe, the weight of those cans would add up quickly in a pack! Even though you don't like ham, I think you might like this. You do taste ham, but you taste other things a whole lot more. It's good! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Daniela Grimburg said...

You made my day with this post, John:)
I actually have some left over ham in the fridge and some friends coming over for a drink this evening. Now I know what to prepare for a tasty appetizer, thank you so much!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Daniela, glad to help! Hope you and your friends enjoy this! Have a drink for me! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

easyfoodsmith said...

Yum! This sounds so wonderful and delicious. A great picnic food indeed.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Taruna, isn't this nice? Loads of flavor, and so fun on picnics! Thanks for the comment.

Spicie Foodie said...

This looks incredible, John. I've never heard of or tasted devil ham but now I really want to. Thanks for sharing!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Nancy, this is such good stuff -- really worth trying sometime. Hope you have a chance to try it. Thanks for the comment.

Nami | Just One Cookbook said...

This is my first time hearing "deviled hams"! I didn't grow up here, but still, I've been here long enough to hear it, but this was my first! I love that we can use leftover hams. Sometimes we have too much that we end up eating the same way. This is definitely a nice change!

shannon weber said...

Is it weird that while i don't care much for regular ham (aside from the big HoneyBaked one, i just don't bother with it), i LOVE deviled ham and ham salad? I have zero idea what my deal is with that, but you're reminded me that i can do something I like with my leftover ham hanging out in the freezer right now. Thank goodness for the 50's and 60's. :)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Nami, "deviled" food used to be pretty popular in the South, and you're a long way from there! So I'm not surprised you haven't heard much about it (and I haven't heard anyone mention deviled ham for decades!). It's good stuff, though -- worth trying. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Shannon, yeah the 50s and 60s really were a storehouse of culinary wisdom, weren't they? ;-) Or maybe desert. Anyway, this really is a great dish. Thanks for the comment.