Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Homemade Mayonnaise

Wire Whisk with Homemade Mayonnaise, on Black Acrylic

You Can Make Your Own By Hand in Under Five Minutes

Homemade mayonnaise is quick and easy to make.  Yet the thought of doing so scares the pants off most of us.

And anyway, we don’t have a lot of incentive.  After all, when it comes to mayo, we can just pick up Hellmann’s, Miracle Whip, or a store brand.  All of these get the job done, and reasonably well.  But would you say that any of them have flavor you’d call memorable?  Yeah, I didn’t think so.

Well, if you can hold a whisk in one hand while dribbling oil into a bowl with the other, you can make your own mayonnaise — and its flavor will be tons better than anything you buy.  Plus, you’ll know exactly what’s in your mayo:  no preservatives, “stabilizers,” or other weird ingredients.  (You can also make mayonnaise in the food processor, and I’ll include instructions for that in the Notes.)

Oh, and making it in under 5 minutes?  I lied.  The actual active time — by hand! — is two minutes or less.  I’m spotting you 3 minutes to amble into the kitchen, find an egg and some oil, measure out ingredients, and so forth.  You can handle that, no?


Homemade Mayonnaise in Red Dish, Overhead View

Recipe:  Homemade Mayonnaise

To make mayonnaise, you just whip egg yolk and an acid (like lemon juice) until it’s foamy, then slowly beat in oil — drop by drop at first, then in a slow stream as the egg yolk and oil form an emulsion. It’s like making Hollandaise Sauce, except you substitute oil for butter. But it’s easier because (unlike with Hollandaise), you don’t need to heat the mixture as you’re making it. And although you can make mayo in the blender or food processor (details in the Notes), it’s actually less trouble doing it by hand (less stuff to wash).

So what scares people off?  Well, many of us not are used to making emulsions — and we’ve heard they can easily go wrong. 

It’s true that emulsions do fail (though only occasionally).  But I’ll provide tips for correcting that problem.  And anyway, if you add a secret ingredient to your mayonnaise, you’ll virtually never fail to form an emulsion. I learned about this in a May 22, 2012 New York Times article by Melissa Clark. The secret ingredient? Water.

Yup, a teaspoon of water “physically broadens the space between fat droplets, helping them stay separate” — a necessity when forming an emulsion. Plus adding a small quantity of water makes a lighter mayo. Win win. I also add a bit of Dijon mustard to my mayo, which helps the process of forming and maintaining the emulsion. Although not traditional, it’s awfully tasty, and it has become a very common ingredient in mayo recipes.

Still worried?  Here’s another tip:  Make sure the egg yolk and oil are both at room temperature.  Things work better when you do.  Just take an egg out of the refrigerator an hour before you plan to make your mayo.  If you don’t have time to do this, warm the mixing bowl with hot water and then dry it.  The warm bowl will take the chill off the egg yolk.

Virtually every mayonnaise recipe is the same, but this one is lightly adapted from Melissa Clark’s.  Actual whisking time is 2 minutes or less (Clark says she can make her mayo in 58 seconds!). 

This recipe yields a bit more than ¾ cup of mayonnaise.  Leftovers will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.  Let your fresh-from-the-refrigerator mayo warm up a bit before stirring it — see Notes for why.

Ingredients
  • 1 large egg yolk, at room temperature (consider using a pasteurized egg; see Notes)
  • 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice (you can substitute wine vinegar, although I don’t think the flavor is as good)
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon cold water (optional, but highly recommended)
  • salt to taste (start with 1/8 teaspoon of table salt, or double that if using kosher salt)
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste (optional, but nice; start with 1/8 teaspoon)
  • 2/3 cup of neutral oil (such as canola, corn, or peanut; extra virgin olive oil can be wonderful in mayo, but see Notes)
Procedure
  1. Put out an egg to warm at least half an hour before you plan to make the mayonnaise (I sometimes put out two in case I break a yolk while separating the egg).
  2. Separate the egg (see Notes for the easiest way) and place the yolk in a medium-sized bowl.  Squeeze half a lemon and add 2 teaspoons of lemon juice to the yolk.  Add the Dijon mustard, a teaspoon of cold water, and a couple of pinches of salt and black pepper.
  3. With a whisk, vigorously stir the mixture together until frothy.  (I often put the bowl on a damp towel so it doesn’t move around.)  If you’re making this for the first time, I’d whisk for a good minute before you begin adding the oil (the main reason emulsions fail is egg yolk that isn’t sufficiently beaten).
  4. Whisk at a good speed without stopping while beginning to add the oil.  Add it slowly at first (drops, or a slow dribble) until the mixture forms an emulsion (i.e., thickens).  Then continue adding the oil in a slow stream. 
  5. Taste, beat in more salt and pepper (or lemon juice) if necessary.  Use right away, or refrigerate until you’re ready to use.

Homemade Mayonnaise in red dish, with lemon, egg, oil, and wire whisk in background

Notes
  • Eggs carry a slight (but real) risk of salmonella, and this recipe requires raw egg.  So I suggest using pasteurized eggs.  Although it’s unlikely that the eggs you buy will be infected, why take the risk? 
  • Here’s the easiest and fastest way to separate an egg:  First wash your hands thoroughly.  Then crack the egg, open the shell into the palm of your hand, and let the egg white run through your slightly open fingers.  I find that it’s fastest if I transfer the egg from one hand to the other once or twice during this process.  When all the white has left your hand, put the egg yolk in separate bowl.  If you have plans for the egg white, I always put that in a separate bowl, too.
  • What to do with the egg whites?  Make dessert!  A good choice would be Homemade Meringues. You’ll need more than one white for this recipe — but you can freeze egg whites, and thaw them when you’ve collected enough. 
  • BTW, if you don’t separate the egg, the white provides moisture, so you don’t need the water. I find using whole egg a bit harder when making mayo by hand, but often include some when using the food processor. 
  • And if you make mayonnaise in the food processor, it’s just about impossible to screw up. The downside is you really need to make more — at least a double batch — because the capacity of the typical food processor is so large. I use a whole egg plus 2 yolks when making mayo in the food processor — letting egg white substitute for water. My food-processor mayo recipe (adapted from Julia Child’s The Way to Cook) requires 1 large egg (both white and yolk), yolks from 2 large eggs, 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard, 2 to 3 teaspoons lemon juice (to taste), salt and pepper to taste (about ½ teaspoon salt, a bit less pepper), and 2 cups (or a bit less) of oil. Add all the ingredients — except the oil — to the bowl of the food processor and process for 10 to 15 seconds with the steel blade. With the machine running, begin adding oil in a thin stream. As the emulsion forms, you can add the rest of the oil a bit more quickly until it’s all incorporated. Taste, adjust for seasoning, and you’re done. Oh, and if the sauce is too thick, add a bit of water or cream to thin it. 
  • I think a food processor works better than a blender for making mayo, but you can use the preceding recipe and procedure with a blender, too. 
  • Machine-made mayo has a different “mouth feel” from handmade. I prefer the mouth feel of handmade, but try both to see which you like better. 
  • Most mayonnaise is made with a neutral oil — that is, one with little, if any, taste. But you can also use extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) — which has a very definite taste. You may find the flavor of the resulting mayo too strong, however. If you’re interested in using EVOO for mayonnaise, I suggest starting with a 50-50 mix of neutral oil and EVOO. 
  • Some people say that using a machine (like a food processor or blender) can turn extra virgin olive oil bitter. I haven’t experienced this, but you may want to make your first batch of EVOO mayo by hand just to take this variable out of the equation. 
  • There is a limit to the amount of oil that an egg yolk can hold in suspension in an emulsion. In my experience, the limit is a bit higher when making mayo by hand — I can incorporate up to ¾ cup. Using a machine, it’s hard to add more than 2/3 cup, and sometimes not quite that. 
  • The first time you make mayo by hand, you may want to use only ½ cup of oil — you may find it a bit easier. 
  • Sometimes mayonnaise turns — it doesn’t thicken, or it thickens and then (when you’re finished) the oil separates, causing the sauce to curdle. If this happens to you, don’t despair — there’s a remedy. Just rinse a clean mixing bowl in hot water and dry it. Add a teaspoon of Dijon mustard, and a tablespoon of the mayonnaise. Beat with a wire whisk until the mixture thickens. Then bit by bit — small bits! — beat in the rest of the sauce. Make sure each bit has been incorporated into the mayonnaise and thickened before adding the next bit. 
  • When you remove homemade mayo from the refrigerator, remember to let it warm before you stir it. Otherwise, the emulsion can break. 
  • You can add all sorts of herbs and flavorings to mayonnaise. Probably the most famous mayo variation is aioli — i.e., mayonnaise made with lots of garlic. Once you’ve mastered making mayo, experiment a bit by adding things that sound good to you. You may surprise yourself with the deliciousness you can create!
Homemade Mayonnaise in red dish, with lemon, egg, oil, and wire whisk in background

Mayo Magic

“Why do we even bother with store-bought mayo?” Mrs. Kitchen Riffs asked as she sampled a freshly made batch of homemade mayonnaise.  “This is so much better.  And no yucky chemicals.”

“Good question,” I pondered.  “Maybe because we don’t use that much of it.  So if we just need a tablespoon or so, it’s easier to get it from the jar rather than make it.”

“But we use it all the time during the summer!” Mrs K R objected.  “You use it in Creamy Coleslaw, and in that great Summer Pasta Salad, BLT Salad, and in potato salad — both your Mustard Potato Salad and the classic American (Mayonnaise) Potato salad. Those would all taste better with homemade mayo!”

“True,” I said. “Maybe we use more mayo than I realized. After all, it’s also the base of our Blue Cheese Dressing and a major ingredient in Tuna Pasta Salad. Not to mention that chicken-and-lettuce salad with mayo that I’ll be making for the next post.”

“Right,” added Mrs K R, “and you yourself said homemade mayo is ‘magic’ in that dish! Your word — it’s right there in the post about the Moroccan Carrot Salad! Why wouldn’t it be magic in all the other dishes?”

“OK, OK,” I surrendered. “After all, it only takes a few minutes to make.”

“And it’s time well spent,” said Mrs K R. Emphatically.

What can I say? When she’s right, she’s right.

You may also enjoy reading about:
Hollandaise Sauce
Zabaglione
Creamy Coleslaw
Summer Pasta Salad
BLT Salad
Mustard Potato Salad
American (Mayonnaise) Potato salad
Blue Cheese Dressing
Tuna Pasta Salad
Homemade Meringues

96 comments:

  1. Wow! I have always wanted to try this. I'm not a huge fan of mayonnaise, but I suspect that I'd love the homemade version. Thanks for the recipe!

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    1. Hi Jeanne, homemade mayo is truly wonderful stuff. Terrific flavor. It makes any mayo-based salad so much better. Thanks for the comment.

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  2. Outstanding photography & commentary. This is one of your best posts!

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  3. I don't use a lot of mayo, but might use more if I made it myself. I'm sure it tastes better than jar mayo. It's pretty fast too. It will be hot here soon and we will need some salads to accompany the grilled foods, will have to try it then. Hope you and the Mrs. are having a good week.
    -Gina-

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    1. Hi Gina, we don't usually use that much mayo either, except for some salads. And it really is fast and (relatively) easy. Thanks for the comment.

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  4. Hi John, your mayonnaise look excellent. Thanks for sharing all the wonderful tips. 2 thumbs up for your outstanding pictures.

    Have a great week ahead.

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    1. Hi Amelia, mayo is such good stuff, isn't it? Thanks for the kind words, and comment.

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  5. Its the raw egg that scares me. Using pasteurized eggs could solve that problem.

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    1. Hi Arthur, raw eggs have come to scare me, too - which is why I always mention pasteurized eggs whenever appropriate. We always keep both pasteurized and unpasteurized eggs in the refrigerator these days. Thanks for the comment.

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  6. I don't know why I don't make my own mayo, it's up there with frozen waffles, pancakes and cookies!! It also could be the idea of whipping up mayo at 5.30am with sleepy eyes and cranky children and then smearing it on sandwiches for packed lunches!

    BUT, there is no excuse not to make it for, like you said, summer time salads and such. Thank you for such wonderful notes and how to. I am determined to make my own now! No excuses.

    Nazneen

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    1. Hi Nazneen, for sandwich spreading, just make it the night before! And I always have a jar on hand for that use, I must admit. But for salads, fresh really is so good. Thanks for the comment.

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  7. You convinced me with your thorough explanation and directions, and since it's on my bucket list, I gotta be a big girl and try it. Love the idea of using the food processor, regardless, it looks super easy. I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks, John!

    Denise

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    1. Hi Denise, this is so easy! Do it once, and you'll wonder why it took you so long - at least that was the case with me. Do let me know how it goes! Thanks for commenting.

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  8. My uncle came to visit us one summer and he made mayonnaise with the use of a hand blender. The taste left an indelible mark on my palette. I still remember how much I enjoyed it (I love mayo) considering that it was ages ago.
    Thanks for sharing the recipe, I always wanted to make my own mayo!
    Malou

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    1. Hi Malou, you should give this a try! The flavor is great (but you already know that!) and it's truly easy. Have fun! And thanks for commenting.

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  9. Homemade mayo or any homemade food is always a good idea. Not only you control the flavor, you also control the type and quality of ingredients you put in it. Good post, John. Thank you!

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    1. Hi Ray, homemade foods solve so many problems, don't they? Particularly flavor - they all taste so much better! Thanks for the comment.

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  10. My mother-in-law lived in Paris for the last years of her life. She described store bought mayo as "rubbish", and always made her own. Never had a problem. This looks great.

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    1. Hi Susie, homemade definitely has so much better flavor that any store-bought I've ever had, that's for sure. And it's so simple! Thanks for the comment.

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  11. That is awesome my friend, I have always been too scared ill over mix or it'll separate but this seems like it is a no-fail recipe :)
    Thank you!

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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    1. Hi Uru, nice thing about mayo is even if you screw it up - unlikely, but it can happen - you can usually save it. Thanks for the comment.

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  12. Great post! I have been working on a homemade mayo recipe that doesn't use seed or veg oils. These tips are fantastic!

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    1. Hi Alyssa, look forward to seeing your homemade mayo recipe! Glad you found this useful, and thanks for the comment.

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  13. John - this is perfect! I've been getting my eggs from a local gal who does the whole free range, organic thing and the yolks are HUGE! I've been wanting to make mayo, but I've never done it, but now I can and I can do it right! I do the emulsion thing all of the time because I always make my own salad dressings, so that's not a problem. I definitely didn't know about the water thing but I do understand what you are saying because of the whole hydrophobic, hydrophilic properties. Great tutorial and much appreciated! I'll let you know how it turns out. BTW - the first picture is awesome!

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    1. Hi MJ, glad you like the first picture - it was a challenge figuring out how to photograph mayo! You'll love making your own mayonnaise, and with free range, organic eggs yours will be superb! Thanks for the kind words, and comment.

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  14. Great pic! I've always wanted to try making it by hand, but the amount scares me off. I don't think I ever use as much as 3/4 cup of mayo in a few days. Though, I guess if it's utterly wonderful tasting, I might have no problem devouring it. ;)

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    1. Hi Carolyn 3/4 cup is a bit, but make potato salad and you'll use much of it. And you'd have no trouble devouring the rest of it, as you suspect. ;-) Thanks for the kind words, and comment.

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  15. Wow I have never thought about making homemade mayo! Great recipe, I won't be buying it at the store anymore :)

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    1. Hi Kristi, your own mayo will open your eyes! Have fun. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  16. Homemade mayo is really nothing like store-bought. It is definitely in a league of its own. Great shot of the whisk, too!

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    1. Hi Laura, isn't homemade mayo so much better? It's like a different food, almost. Thanks for the kind words, and comment.

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  17. I love that you made your own mayo!! ya know, my husband HATES mayo and I wonder if he'd like a homemade version!!

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    1. Hi Ashley, you never know whether your husband will like homemade mayo until you try! Hand mayo has a more pleasant mouth feel than store-bought IMO - it's softer, creamier, and lighter. That alone may do the trick with hubby! Thanks for the comment.

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  18. Truly a great post. You have a way of making things seem doable. I've made mayo before but that two minutes makes me want to try it again. And that photo... Well, I would have licked that whisk clean.

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    1. Hi Abbe, you're so kind! Once you get your head around what it is that you're doing in making mayo, you'll beat that 2 minute mark easily. But take at least that long the first time - no need to rush. Thanks for the kind words, and comment.

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  19. Indeed, mayonnaise is so easy to prepare by hand and it tastes 1000x better and is much healthier than any store-bought mayo. At home, I always make mine...

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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    1. Hi Rosa, homemade mayo is so simple to make! And as you say, the taste is at least a thousand times better! Thanks for the comment.

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  20. I love making mayonnaise but I don't think I could win the 58 second contest. :)

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    1. Hi Maureen, I can't contend for the 58 second contest either! But I'm quite happy with the small amount of time it takes to make something so wonderful. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  21. Wow, thanks for sharing such wealth of information on homemade mayo! Must try soon!

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    1. Hi Kiran, you'll love how homemade mayo tastes! And once you get into it, you'll find it's quite easy to make, too. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  22. You are absolutely right..we never know what goes into the store brought brands. You have given a fool proof recipe and this helps a lot. Thanks for posting the tips too.

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    1. Hi Shibi, the older I get, the more agitated I get when I read food labels! And mayo is so easy to make, it's something everyone should learn to do IMO. Thanks for the comment.

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  23. Dude, seriously this is divine. Great recipe and great photos. As usual, you never fail to impress.

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    1. Hi Kim, I'm always happy to impress! This is really super stuff - you should give it and try. And impress your family. ;-) Thanks for the kind words, and comment.

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  24. I don't even have the excuse of thinking it was too hard, since my mom always made homemade mayonnaise. I don't know why I've never made it myself, but this was a great reminder to give it a try!

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    1. Hi Beth, you really should give this a try! IMO you'll still want to stock store-bought mayo for those times when you need just a tablespoon or so, but for any application where you need at least half a cup, IMO homemade is so good it's worth making - even if you don't end up using all of it. Thanks for the comment.

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  25. I love to make my own mayo. At least you know what goes into it! xx

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    1. Hi Charlie, there's something so relaxing about making mayo, isn't there? Once you know that you can do it, of course! Thanks for the comment.

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  26. Homemade mayo is the absolute best! I don't think I've made it in anywhere close to 58 seconds. Now, I want to whip up a batch with a timer running! Also, I love adding miso to homemade mayonnaise.

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    1. Hi Lisa, I've only casually timed myself (just ballpark timing, not down to the split-second) and I'm nowhere near 58 seconds! A minute and a half (or bit more) is more like it. It's actually a surprisingly quick process, though. Love the idea of adding miso to mayo! Thanks for the comment.

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  27. I love reading your posts John, I always learn something new.
    Loved the tip about adding water, I didnot know about that.Homemade mayo, I am sure is way better than anything you can buy, thank you for all the tips and suggestions

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    1. Hi Sawsan, homemade mayo is wonderful stuff! And it is a bit easier to make when adding water. Thanks for the comment.

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  28. I make mayo infrequently, like I do butter or cream cheese. Once I get into the habit again, I wonder why I ever bought it. Then, somehow, a jar of mayo will make its way into my fridge and I'll suspend making it -- until the next time. I didn't know about the tsp water, though, and that's a great tip. This was a great, instructional post, John. Thanks for taking the time to prepare and post it.

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    1. Hi John, that teaspoon of water tip is worth doing! We certainly buy store-bought mayo for those times when we need just a little. And it's always so easy to use the jar, rather than take the couple of minutes to make one's own. But I do like to make my own, whenever possible. Thanks for the comment.

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  29. Yay, homemade may is the best! And I find I use more when I have a batch on hand (wonderful to make creamy dressings). My favorite way to enjoy homemade mayo is by dipping freshly steamed asparagus in it. Your top photo is extra stunning!

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    1. Hi Hannah, I tend to use more when I have a batch on hand, too. Although it may be that since I'm making a batch, I think of ways to use it. ;-) Thanks for the kind words, and comment.

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  30. I totally agree with Mrs. Kitchen Riffs. After reading your mayo tutorial, I don't know why I haven't tried this before and skipped all the added ingredients. I imagine it doesn't last as long in the frig, but if you can make a batch in no time flat, who needs the preservatives.

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    1. Hi Kristi, it definitely doesn't last as long - 5 days is pushing it but doable IMO, 7 is totally tops. I'd say 3 to 4 is best. And it's so worth it! Thanks for the comment.

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  31. Homemade mayo is 100 times better than the store bought version. I like your recipe it looks so creamy and delicious! I cannot reinforce how important it is to use pasteurized eggs maybe unless you live in Japan or Italy where they do not have the Salmonella issues. After, I left from a trip to Amsterdam I was on a mission to recreate that tasty mayo they serve on the sides of their frites. The only difference with our recipes is that I use a tiny pinch of cayenne pepper and it really just gives the mayo that little zip when you pair it with your frites. You are making me hungry I might have to whip an batch of fresh mayo and frites.

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    1. Hi Bam, cayenne pepper would be a wonderful addition! And I agree with you the salmonella, although remote, is so worth considering. Thanks for the comment.

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  32. I always make my own mayo. The store-bought version just tastes different. I must admit I use a food processor to make it and never have any problems. Like you, I add a little mustard powder for flavour. I add a little olive oil to a more neutral one to give it a little body, but only olive oil is definitely bitter.

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    1. Hi Suzanne, mustard really is nice in mayo. The food processor is what I use, too, when I need a bunch. Usually I need less than a cup, and the hand method works pretty well for me. Thanks for the comment.

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  33. I have fond memory of my father and I trying to make mayonnaise at home using manual eggbeater, failed ones to be specific :)

    Thanks for the informative post. Will have to try out sometimes and hopefully will be a successful attempt.

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    1. Hi Lail, I think one of those hand eggbeaters would be difficult - they don't really whisk better than a whip, IMO (this assumes you have a whip that's matches your bowl size well). I hope you enjoy making your own! Thanks for the comment.

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  34. Great photography! You're right. I never really considered making mayo at home. The thought of using raw eggs does freak me out a bit. But after reading your post, I may actually try it. Loved reading this post John!

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    1. Hi Gomo, I think you'll have a lot of fun making your own mayo! But do search for pasteurized eggs - they'll put your mind at ease about the whole raw deal. Thanks for the kind words, and comment.

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  35. What a great article with so much information !
    I normally do not eat mayo that much, but the next time I am going to eat it, I will be using this recipe :)

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    1. Hi Sketched Chef, it's really worth making your own mayo unless you need just a tablespoon or so. The flavor is so delish! Thanks for the comment.

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  36. Yes, I've heard that homemade mayonnaise is the best and is pretty easy to make. Never tried it, but why not? Yours looks like a real thing! :)

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    1. Hi Julia, Homemade Mayo really is worth checking out. Totally wonderful! Thanks for the comment.

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  37. Nothing beats homemade. Never tried to make Mayo myself but you inspired me, John. Great post!

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    1. Hi Holly, it's really worth trying homemade mayo at least once - its flavor is so good! Not worth it if you rarely use mayo, totally worth it if you use it all the time. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  38. This looks amazing. I have never thought about making my own mayonnaise, but now you got me thinking that maybe it is time to try.

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    1. Hi Dawn, you have to do this! So worth it, and you'll love it. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  39. I am scared to make mayo....was...now I am not, thank you to this post!!! I remember on Food Network when the show The Two Fat Ladies made homemade mayo. They made it sound like making homemade mayo was really involved, and really hard. Thank you for shedding light on this, hubby and I are excited to try this recipe! Take care, Terra

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    1. Hi Terra, you can so do this! Not hard, not involved, although things can go wrong - and I think I've covered those. Add the oil S L O W L Y and it'll work. Thanks for the comment.

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  40. I love making my own mayonnaise too, sometimes I add some garlic too.

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    1. Hi Raymund, the garlic version of mayo is wonderful! Thanks for the comment.

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  41. Lovely picture!! that should go nut in Pinterest =)
    btw you are absolutly right, Homemade mayo is the BEST!

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    1. Hi Helene, Pinterest is loads of fun, isn't it? ;-) And homemade mayo has such a wonderful flavor! Thanks for the comment.

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  42. Lemon juice! I was looking for the word vinegar but I realized you don't add it. I can't wait to try this at home. Your mayo shot is amazing. It looks modern yet totally capture of our attention!

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    1. Hi Nami, lemon juice is a wonderful acid in mayo. Although you can certainly use vinegar. Thanks for the kind words, and comment.

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  43. I made my own as well with a help of friends. It was a two man job for me but you're right, it was delicious :) always worth making a homemade version.

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    1. Hi Marta, is can be useful to have someone pour the oil for you. But I'm pretty good at whisking with one hand, pouring with the other. And homemade is so wonderful! Thanks for the comment.

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  44. This is absolutely perfectly--I hate those days when I run out of mayo and just can't bear to drag myself out of my PJ's long enough to go to the store. Thanks, John!

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    1. Hi Ala, glad to provide you with an excuse to stay home. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

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  45. thank for your recipe. I tried it, but i don't know why it became harder, look like butter when i kept it in fridge!!

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    1. Hi, thanks for your comment. I'm not sure why it became harder when in the refrigerator - I've not seen it. It certainly will firm up in the refrigerator, but should still be quite spreadable. Was it the right consistency before you refrigerated it? What kind of oil did you use - some that include some impurities can get more solid when refrigerated.

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  46. Vellie B. in AntiguaJanuary 11, 2014 at 2:52 PM

    Fantastic! Am going right away to try the homemade mayo! Thx!

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    1. Hi Vellie, enjoy! And thanks for the comment.

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