Wednesday, March 2, 2022

The Tipperary Cocktail

The Tipperary Cocktail
Irish whiskey makes this classic a natural for St. Patrick’s Day

This drink features Irish whiskey and sweet vermouth (so it resembles a Celtic Manhattan). But there’s also green Chartreuse liqueur in the mix – which makes for an extra tangy drink.

And who can resist tangy?

 

The Tipperary Cocktail
Recipe: The Tipperary Cocktail

This drink made its print debut in Hugo R. Ensslin’s Recipes for Mixed Drinks, published in 1917. The original version contained equal parts Irish whiskey, sweet vermouth, and green Chartreuse.

Over time, bartenders adapted the formula to create a drink that is drier and (in our opinion) better balanced. We prefer the modern version to the original, so that’s what we use.

This recipe takes about 5 minutes to prepare and serves 1.

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces Irish whiskey
  • ¾ ounce sweet (Italian) vermouth
  • ½ ounce green Chartreuse (see Notes)
  • 2 dashes Angostura or orange bitters (optional; see Notes)
  • garnish of lemon twist (optional; may substitute orange twist)

Procedure 

  1. Add all ingredients (except garnish) to a mixing glass half filled with ice. Stir briskly until the contents are well chilled (30 seconds or so).
  2. Strain into a cocktail glass, preferably one that’s been chilled. Add garnish, if you wish, and serve.

The Tipperary Cocktail
Notes

  • Why stir rather than shake this cocktail? Because all the ingredients are clear. Shaking creates small oxygen bubbles, which can temporarily cloud the drink. This isn’t a problem if some of the ingredients are opaque (as is the case with drinks containing citrus). 
  • But go ahead and shake if you want. We often do.
  • This drink traditionally is served up in a cocktail glass. Though we also like it over ice in a rocks glass.
  • The original version of this drink didn’t contain bitters. But we think bitters enhance the flavor noticeably. We prefer Angostura bitters, but orange bitters also work.
  • Chartreuse liqueur dates back to the 1730s, when French Carthusian monks began making it in the town of Voiron (which is close to Grenoble in southeastern France). 
  • Chartreuse has a strong herbal flavor (it’s made from 130 herbs, roots, and leaves). Green Chartreuse is the classic version (and its hue inspired the name of the color chartreuse). There’s also a yellow version, which is milder and less edgy than the green. 
  • So how did this drink originate? Legend says it was inspired when a gent, seeking to wet his whistle, walked into a bar humming the popular World War I song, “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary.” The barkeep was prompted to create this cocktail – and to name it after the song.
  • The song, which references the Irish town of Tipperary, was composed around 1912 as a music hall ditty. It became a popular marching song for British soldiers during World War I.

The Tipperary Cocktail
Silly, and Hoping You’re the Same

“What a swell drink!” said Mrs. Kitchen Riffs. “Can’t believe it’s taken us this long to feature it on the blog.”

“Well, ‘It’s a long way to Tipperary,’” I said.

“That may be your worst attempt at a joke ever,” said Mrs K R. “Scary how your mind works.”

“Just remember, when I make mistakes, ‘It’s the pen that’s bad,’” I said. “’Don’t lay the blame on me!’”

“Stop already!” said Mrs K R. “You have ‘fairly drove me silly.’”

That’s Mrs K R all right: “The sweetest girl I know!”

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58 comments:

  1. Now this is a drink that I could use now, with all the bad news going 'round' (the orange bitters looks especially swell)!I made a French dish once called 'Lobster Chartreuse' and I still don't know how it got its name- the garnishes were orange and white- no green!

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    1. Hi Fran, I've come across a couple of French "chartreuse" recipes that have nothing to do with the color or the liqueur. But this is the sort of Chartreuse recipe I really like! :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  2. I have never had green Chartreuse but it sounds perfect for St. Patrick's Day!!

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    1. Hi Dahn, it's a delish liqueur. And great cocktail ingredient! Thanks for the comment.

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  3. Sounds very tasty! Great photo.

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    1. Hi Pam, very, very tasty. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  4. Before it was the name of a liqueur, “Chartreuse” simply meant “Carthusian” — that is, it was the name of the order of monks, as well as being the name of several places that were associated with the monks. The color name “chartreuse” derived from the liqueur, but the name can also refer to other associations with the monastic order, which existed for several centuries before they invented the drink. Google reveals that “chartreuse style” originally referred to a dish that was in aspic and arranged in the shape of a goblet, not using the liqueur. Interesting to look these things up!

    NIce drink photos!
    best… mae at maefood.blogspot.com

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    1. Hi Mae, that was really interesting! Thanks for looking it up. :-) And thanks for the comment.

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  5. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary” always makes me tear up a little not because I had one too many Tipperary but because of the final Mary Tyler Moore show! I just aged myself... Old enough for this cocktail for sure. GREG

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    1. Hi Greg, that was such a great show! And yes, that song played an important part in the last scene of the show. Thanks for the comment.

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  6. As is often the case, I like the history lesson (almost) as much as the cocktail. As I try to embrace brown liquor more, this sounds like it has plenty of extra components to help me do so. Thanks for the recipe, John!

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    1. Hi Terry, cocktail history is fun! Even more fun to drinks the cocktails, though. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  7. Beautiful!! And the perfect way to celebrate the Irish on St. Patrick's Day!

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    1. Hi Liz, we do have some Irish heritage, but even if we didn't we'd be Irish on St. Pat's Day. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  8. We may need to get some Chartreuse in honour of the Irish. Or really just so we can try this charming cocktail. It is very pretty and inviting John, thank you.

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    1. Hi Merryn, its flavor is VERY inviting. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  9. I do really like chartreuse and the flavor it gives. My dad used to hum that song, too. Hum-because he couldn't get past the title! He would have loved this drink!

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    1. Hi Abbe, isn't the flavor of Chartreuse terrific? And it play so nicely with the Irish whiskey in this drink. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  10. Ohh I never knew there was an opposite of "Shaken, not stirred"

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  11. That looks absolutely gorgeous and sounds really wonderful for St. Patrick Day or anyday!

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    1. Hi Angie, it really is a wonderful drink. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  12. What a fabulous cocktail to make with Irish whiskey. Never heard of Chartreuse. I love learning from you!

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    1. Hi Laura, Chartreuse is definitely worth getting to know -- fabulous flavor, and you can use it in several other drinks. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  13. love the photos John. and what a smashing cocktail!

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    1. Hi Sherry, definitely smashing, particularly if you drink more than 2 of these. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  14. You have given such an interesting back story to this cocktail John, and I would be definitely having it on the rocks in our climate.Looks delicious. I've never had Chartreuse that I can remember, I'll look out for it now though, but I've been to Tipperary and it is a long way from here and I know the song well. It's a favourite ditty at sing songs around the piano. Thanks for a great post.

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    1. Hi Pauline, Tipperary really is a long, long way from where you are! I've never been -- would love to visit sometime. Thanks for the comment.

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  15. I love the idea of whiskey and sweet vermouth combination - must be so tasty yet not overly strong. The presentation looks also stunning (As always!)

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    1. Hi Ben, really, really tasty. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  16. John, your collection of delicious and interesting cocktails is never ending. I love it! Read through some comments and now I really miss Mary Tyler Moore! :-) ~Valentina

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    1. Hi Valentina, yeah, the Mary Tyler Moore sow was one of the best TV shows ever. Thanks for the comment.

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  17. May the luck of the Irish be with you and this bright and delicious cocktail. I'm sure there will be a rainbow in the sky after a few of these to wet your whistle.

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    1. Hi Bobbi, very definite rainbows. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  18. Do hope your sense of humour is alive and well - I love Irish whisky and Irish people and the Emerald Isle . . . Now, you won't mind if I pour this into a heavy tumbler, do you . . . somehow cocktail glasses and the Oirish do not match as far as I am concerned . . .

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    1. Hi Eha, we often enjoy this in a tumbler. Nice either "up" or "on the rocks." :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  19. I love how this is tangy - I don't think I've ever had anything like it!

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    1. Hi Ashley, you owe it to yourself to have one! :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  20. The cocktail sounds wonderful I love your knowledge when it comes to making cocktails. Your pictures are always so beautiful.

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    1. Hi Dawn, aw, thanks for that very kind comment! :-)

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  21. Such a gorgeous little cocktail!

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    1. Hi MJ, charming flavor, too. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  22. I made a chartreuse jelly for the Titanic dinner party many moons ago, interesting liquor. This cocktail is beautiful, love the glass too. Happy St.Patrick’s Day! Éva http://kitcheninspirations.wordpress.com/

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    1. Hi Eva, Chartreuse jelly sounds delish! Happy St. Pat's Day to you, and thanks for the comment.

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  23. Lovely color. I can't believe it's time for St. Patrick's Day prep! I've got a cocktail I'm posting up soon that I made for last year's meager celebration. :) Cheers!

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    1. Hi Debra, these holidays always really sneak up on us, don't they? :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  24. It sounds sweet and wonderful - thanks

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    1. Hi Judee, it's good. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  25. Well, as we’ve already had a nice chitchat about this on Facebook, John, I will let you know that I bought my Irish whiskey this morning at Trader Joe’s. I’m ready! see? It’s not a long way to Tipperary… Just 3 miles to Trader Joe’s.

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    1. Hi David, we did have a nice Facebook chitchat! I'm lucky -- I'm about a 20 minute walk from 2 different liquor/wine stores, both of them quite good. So Tipperary is a bit closer for me. :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  26. Replies
    1. Hi Balvinder, delish, too! :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  27. Nice to see a reasonably sized cocktail glass again! This is lovely. Your drinks always make want to get out my school notes and play with lighting again!

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    1. Hi Inger, playing with lighting is fun! :-) Thanks for the comment.

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  28. I'm a big fan of chartreuse and just bought a bottle, so this is what I'll be making. Cheers!

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    1. HI Laura, Chartreuse is so nice, isn't it? :-) Thanks for the comment.

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