Wednesday, September 7, 2022

The Claridge Cocktail

The Claridge Cocktail
Apricot and orange liqueurs add aromatic flavor to this 1920s Martini variant

The days are becoming shorter in our part of the world. And the weather is a bit less sultry. So our cocktail choices are turning from tall coolers toward short bracers.

Like this one – a most excellent combination of gin, dry vermouth, apricot liqueur, and Cointreau.

Prost! 

The Claridge Cocktail

Recipe: The Claridge Cocktail

The Claridge probably was developed during the 1920s – a period some call the golden age of cocktails (more in the Notes).

This drink is a slightly sweeter, more aromatic version of the dry Martini Cocktail. But it’s not too sweet to serve as an apĂ©ritif.

Our recipe comes from cocktail writer Paul Clarke, who refined earlier iterations of the drink. In order to balance the drink properly (with easy-to-manage quantities), Clarke designed this recipe to be one of the rare ones that yields 2 servings.

This recipe takes about 5 minutes to prepare and serves 2. So drink it with a pal.

Ingredients

  • 2¼ ounces dry gin
  • 2¼ ounces dry vermouth (white French vermouth)
  • ¾ ounce apricot liqueur (sometimes erroneously called apricot brandy; see Notes)
  • ¾ ounce Cointreau (or another triple sec)

Procedure 

  1. Add all the ingredients to a mixing glass half filled with ice. Stir until the contents are well chilled (20 to 30 seconds).
  2. Strain into a pair of cocktail glasses, preferably ones that have been chilled. Serve and enjoy.

The Claridge Cocktail
Notes

  • We don’t think garnish is necessary with this drink. But if you insist, we would suggest a lemon twist or peel. An orange twist might work too.
  • Why stir instead of shake? Because all the ingredients are clear. Shaking introduces small bubbles, which can cloud the drink. (This isn’t a problem with opaque ingredients like citrus juice).
  • In truth, though, we often shake anyway – the oxygen bubbles dissipate quickly. 
  • Speaking of clear: This drink has a very light straw (almost golden) tint. Not transparent, but not saturated with color either. Although it is saturated with flavor!
  • Any name-brand dry gin works well in this drink.
  • Likewise, any name-brand dry (French) vermouth. 
  • We do recommend using Cointreau, which is a premium triple sec (i.e., an orange-flavored liqueur). Other triple secs would work too – but be aware that some of the less expensive triple secs are rather sweet (which you don’t want for this drink). 
  • Many cocktail recipes call for apricot brandy when they really mean apricot liqueur. True apricot brandy is hard to find. It’s distilled directly from apricots, while most apricot liqueurs have a neutral spirit as their base (and are flavored with apricots). Adding to the confusion, many brands that are labeled “apricot brandy” are actually apricot liqueur. 
  • The best brands of apricot liqueur that we’ve found are Marie Brizard’s Apry and Rothman & Winter’s Orchard Apricot. The latter is what we typically use. But there are other good brands out there – so if your liquor store has another suggestion, listen to them.
  • Our usual disclaimer: We’re noncommercial and do not benefit from mentioning brands. We suggest only products that we like (and buy with our own money).
  • So what’s the background on this drink? As far as we know, it was first mentioned in print by Harry MacElhone in his 1927 book Barflies and Cocktails (MacElhone was a bartender who later became owner of Harry’s New York Bar, a storied Paris establishment). According to MacElhone, the Claridge was created by a bartender named Leon at the Claridge Hotel in Paris. We’ve read other speculations about the drink’s history, but this one rings truest to us.

The Claridge Cocktail
Gold Rush

“Super drink!” said Mrs. Kitchen Riffs. “Love the aroma. Not to mention the flavor.”

“Perky,” I said. “And a nice color. Good as gold, you might say.”

“Don’t you ever feel gilt-y at these weak joke attempts?” said Mrs K R.

“Naw, they’re just a miner part of our blog posts,” I said.

“I may have to pan that comment,” said Mrs K R.

“I was hoping for a gold star,” I said.

“I’m overloded here,” said Mrs K R. “Don’t make me open a vein.”

Guess I midas well put a spike in it.

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40 comments:

Healthy World Cuisine said...

Love how crystal clear the golden Claridge cocktails is. Fall flavors for perfect after dinner sipping.

Angie's Recipes said...

What a beautiful and tasty drink! I would really love one right now, John.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Bobbi, the color of this is subtle, but really nice. And the flavor is outstanding! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Angie, this is a great drink! Really worth having. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Pam said...

You had me at orange and apricot. It sounds tasty!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Pam, it's really tasty! An usually -- and usually good! -- drink. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Anne in the kitchen said...

This sounds as delightful of a drink as the banter is to read! I am going to be trying this one before too long.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Anne, we do love that banter! :-) Thanks for the comment.

savorthebest said...

Apricot and orange sounds like a delicious combination, it sounds like dessert ;)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Pat and Dahn, it does sound like a dessert! But rather on the dry side (although it does have a definite touch of sweetness to it -- but subtle, not aggressively so). Thanks for the comment.

Mae Travels said...

There must be millions of possible ways to combine liqueurs and brandies and fruit syrups and juices… and eventually you will get through every one of them!

best… mae at maefood.blogspot.com

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Mae, there must be a million! But we'll get through only the good ones. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Raymund said...

Loving the colour too, shining gold, looks elegant

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Raymund, really elegant flavor, too! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Sherry's Pickings said...

you two! so funny. love your photos and the drink sounds amazing.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Sherry, :-) Thanks for the comment.

speedy70 said...

Alla salute!!!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Speedy, Salute! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Ashley @ Wishes and Dishes said...

Loving this cozy fall drink. Cheers!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Ashley, cheers! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Pam said...

Another little awesome cocktail, John! I love dry gin and vermouth too and if Mrs Riffs says it's a "super drink," it's a must try!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Pam, this is a great drink -- think you'll like it. :-) Thanks for the comment.

gluten Free A_Z Blog said...

I do love apricot liquor and would certainly enjoy this delicious looking fall drink.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Judee, it's an excellent drink. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Liz That Skinny Chick Can Bake said...

Oooh, this combination of ingredients sounds terrific!! The apricot liqueur sold me!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Liz, really, really good stuff. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Food Gal said...

That looks like one elegant and sophisticated drink. I bet it tastes just like that, too. ;)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Carolyn, kind of a gussied up Martini. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Balvinder said...

Another elegant cocktail!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Balvinder, it is! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Ben | Havocinthekitchen said...

Such an elegant and delicate cocktail with a great flavour combination!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Ben, isn't this nice? SO good! :-) Thanks for the comment.

speedy70 said...

Una deliziosa variante, da provare, grazie!!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Speedy, isn't this great looking? Really wonderful flavor. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Dawn @ Words Of Deliciousness said...

Sounds like a delicious cocktail. I love your pictures. They look so elegant.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Dawn, it's a great drink! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Shashi at SavorySpin said...

So much flavor in this from that apricot liqueur and Cointreau - and it looks so regal! Fantastic recipe!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Shashi, it's really a good drink! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Inger @ Art of Natural Living said...

I could feel myself missing out on your cocktails while I was "away." So glad I'm catching up and got to see this. Love your tips--and Cointreau is what I have!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Inger, this is an excellent drink -- SO worth having! Thanks for the comment.