Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Wine-Braised Beef Pot Roast

Wine-Braised Beef Pot Roast

Easy and classic French-style cooking (that’s also down home)

When we entertain, we often like to serve a big honking hunk of meat. Preferably something that’s full of flavor, easy to prepare—and can be made ahead of time.

Like pot roast.

Doesn’t sound fancy enough for company? Then just call it braised beef. And cook it with wine, the way the French do. All of a sudden we’re talking gourmet fare (and the perfect complement to a bottle of dry red wine).

Just make sure to prepare a big batch. Because your guests will be begging for seconds.



Wine-Braised Beef Pot Roast

Recipe: Wine-Braised Beef Pot Roast

Beef makes perfect dinner-party fare. But unlike more highfalutin’ dishes (like standing rib roast), this one won’t break the bank. And when properly prepared, nothing offers more flavor and satisfaction than pot roast.

To make this dish, you first brown the meat, then cook it at the barest simmer in a mix of wine and beef stock. The result is very reminiscent of Boeuf Bourguignon (though for that dish, you cut the meat into small pieces and use more simmering liquid).

When making pot roast, we like to braise the beef in the oven (which provides an even cooking temperature). But you can cook it entirely on the stovetop if you prefer (we provide instructions for both methods). The important thing is to keep the braising liquid at the barest simmer.

BTW, when buying beef for pot roast, we often ask the butcher to tie the meat so it will hold together better while cooking. But this is very optional.

We like to serve sliced pot roast over a bed of mashed potatoes, accompanied by gravy made from the braising liquid. But if mashies aren’t your thing, feel free to substitute.

We learned about wine-braised pot roast from Julia Child. So our recipe is based on hers. She published several different recipes in her various books, but our favorite is the one we found in The Way to Cook.

Prep time for this recipe is at least 30 minutes, with braising time adding another 2½ to 3½ hours (largely unattended). So make this dish on a day when you have some time to spare (you can make it partly ahead of time if you prefer; see the Notes for suggestions).

How many people will this recipe serve? We figure that each pound of meat will satisfy 2 to 3, depending on appetites. So adjust accordingly.

Since our recipe calls for about 4 pounds of beef, you’ll probably have leftovers unless you’re serving a crowd. No worries. Leftover pot roast keeps for a few days if refrigerated in an airtight container. Or you can freeze it.

Ingredients
  • ~4 pounds of beef, preferably bottom or top round (see Notes for alternative cuts)
  • a sprinkling of kosher salt (maybe ½ teaspoon)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (or another oil)
  • 1 onion (about 1 cup, chopped)
  • 1 or 2 carrots (about 1 cup, chopped)
  • 2 or 3 garlic cloves (to taste)
  • additional tablespoon of olive oil
  • additional salt to taste (about ½ teaspoon kosher salt)
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste (several grinds)
  • ~3 cups dry red wine (such as Côtes du Rhône, Chianti, or Zinfandel—see Notes)
  • 1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes
  • beef stock as needed (typically 1 or 2 cups; see Step 6)
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 3 or 4 parsley sprigs
  • 2 or 3 tablespoons cornstarch (optional—for the gravy; see Notes)
Procedure
  1. If you plan to braise the meat in the oven, preheat it to 300 degrees F. 
  2. Brown the meat: Place a Dutch oven on medium stovetop heat (use one that’s large enough to hold the meat comfortably, since you’ll also use this cooking pot for braising). Pat the meat dry, then season it with salt. When the Dutch oven is hot, add the oil. When the oil is heated (it’ll shimmer), add the beef to the Dutch oven. Reduce the stovetop heat somewhat, and brown the first side of the beef (this will take 4 or 5 minutes). Then turn the meat and brown another side. Continue until all sides of the beef are browned.
  3. While the meat is browning, peel the onion and chop it into dice (or slices) of about ½ inch. Scrub or peel the carrot, then chop it coarsely into pieces of ½ inch or so. Peel the garlic and chop it coarsely.
  4. Place a skillet on medium stovetop heat. Once the skillet is hot, add a tablespoon of oil. When the oil is heated (it’ll shimmer), add the chopped onion, carrot, and garlic to the skillet. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and sauté for 5 or 6 minutes (until the onion just becomes translucent). Lower the heat if necessary so the garlic doesn’t burn. 
  5. When the meat is browned, remove it from the Dutch oven and set it aside. Pour the fat off the Dutch oven, then add a cup of red wine to the cooking pot. Bring the wine a boil, scraping up any browned bits that have stuck to the bottom of the Dutch oven.
  6. By this time, the vegetables should be cooked. Scrape the cooked vegetables into the Dutch oven. Place the browned beef on top. Add the rest of the red wine and the tomato. Add enough beef stock so that liquid comes about halfway up the side of the meat. Add the thyme and parsley sprigs. Bring the liquid to a simmer on the stovetop. Then place aluminum foil over the beef, crimping the foil down along the sides of the pan just above the braising liquid, and cover the Dutch oven with its lid. Place the Dutch oven in the preheated oven, and set a timer for 45 minutes. (Or if you’re cooking this dish on the stovetop, bring the liquid to the barest simmer, then cover the beef with aluminum foil and place the lid on the Dutch oven.)
  7. At the 45-minute mark, check to see how vigorously the liquid is simmering—you want just the barest simmer. Adjust the heat to control the simmering rate. Flip the beef over, recover with aluminum foil, and set a timer for 1 hour. At the hour mark, flip the beef again, recover with the foil, and cook until done (typically 2½ to 3½ hours total). How do you know it’s done? A metal skewer or sharp fork should pierce the meat without much resistance. If in doubt, cut off a small piece of beef and bite into it. The meat should be fairly tender. (To be on the safe side, you might want to start testing after 2 hours of simmering.)
  8. When the beef is done, remove it from the Dutch oven and set it aside on a plate or carving board for at least 20 minutes (30 or 40 is better). Cover the meat with aluminum foil while it’s resting. Place a strainer over a bowl or a large measuring cup, and pour the braising liquid from the Dutch oven through the strainer into the bowl. Empty the carrots and onions into the strainer, then use a spoon to press the liquid out of them.
  9. Discard the carrot-and-onion mixture (or do as we do, and serve it to the cook as a treat; it’s quite tasty). Measure the amount of braising liquid that you have poured through the strainer—it should amount to 2 or 3 cups. Spoon off any fat that has risen to the surface, then pour the braising liquid into a clean saucepan. If you have more than 3 cups of liquid, bring it to a simmer and then reduce it. Otherwise, just hold the liquid over low heat until ready to serve (you'll be using it as a sauce for the meat). Taste the braising liquid, and adjust the salt and black pepper if necessary.
  10. When you’re ready to serve the beef, you may want to thicken the braising liquid. If so, mix the cornstarch with an equal amount of cold water. Remove the sauce from the heat, then stir in the cornstarch, making a gravy.
  11. Cut the beef into slices ½-inch thick, then serve with the sauce/gravy. We like to serve pot roast over a bed of mashed potatoes.
Wine-Braised Beef Pot Roast

Notes
  • If you want to prepare this dish partly in advance, there are two natural stopping points: after Step 5 or after Step 8.
  • If you want to stop after Step 5: Brown the beef and sauté the vegetables. Then place the beef, vegetables, wine, and other cooked ingredients into a covered container and refrigerate for 24 hours (this will marinate the beef). The next day, continue with the rest of the recipe. BTW, you should turn the beef in the marinating liquid two or three times while it’s in the refrigerator.
  • If you want to stop after Step 8: After completing this step, allow the beef and braising liquid to cool. Then wrap the meat well and refrigerate it. Place the braising liquid in a covered container and refrigerate it. You can refrigerate the beef and braising liquid for up to 48 hours. When ready to serve, make the gravy (Steps 9 and 10). Slice the cold meat, then warm it in 2 or 3 cups of simmering beef or chicken stock before serving (you’ll discard the stock—it’s being used only to bring the meat to serving temperature).
  • Warming cold, sliced meat in stock is a trick we learned from the restaurant trade. This method allows restaurant staff to reheat portions as they’re needed, rather than reheating an entire roast. A bonus here is that meat slices better when cold. And it only takes a minute or two to warm the slices in stock.
  • For this dish, you should use a cut of meat that holds its shape well when sliced. Bottom round is our favorite, although top round works well too. You can also use chuck roast (which actually has better flavor), though it doesn’t always hold its shape as well.
  • BTW, the meat you use should contain some fat. During the long cooking process, the fat (and some of the meat’s proteins) will break down, which is what tenderizes the meat. Without enough fat, the meat will tend to dry out during cooking.
  • The crust that forms on the bottom of the pan when you brown meat holds a great deal of flavor. That’s why you deglaze the pan with wine (Step 5)—to capture some of that flavor.
  • We prefer to make this dish in the oven rather than on the stovetop because the oven provides more even heat. But either method works. The most important thing is to keep the braising liquid just at a simmer—you don’t want it to boil.
  • In either case, be sure to cover the meat with aluminum foil, crimping the foil down along the sides of the pan, just above the braising liquid. Why? Because meat braises better if there isn’t too much “headroom” (extra space) above it. The aluminum foil cover essentially reduces the size of the Dutch oven so that it exactly fits the size of the pot roast and its braising liquid.
  • There’s no need to use spendy wine for the braising liquid. We typically use something in the $10 to $12 per bottle range, but even a good jug wine is fine. You want something that is hearty enough to add oomph to the dish. If in doubt, ask your wine merchant—they’ll have a suggestion.
  • We often use a full bottle of wine in the braising liquid. In that case, we sometimes leave out the beef stock in Step 6 (if the wine provides a sufficient quantity of liquid), and instead add some beef base to the braising wine for extra flavor. Beef base is concentrated beef stock that’s sold as a paste—you can find it in the soup aisle at your grocery store, or online.
  • You don’t have to thicken the sauce (gravy), but we like to do so. We usually thicken it with cornstarch because that’s quick and easy. If you prefer, however, you could make a roux. If you go that route, you’d probably need 2 tablespoons each of butter and flour for the amount of gravy in this dish. 
  • We use kosher salt for cooking. Kosher salt has big flakes, so it doesn’t fill a measuring spoon as “tightly” as regular table salt. Hence, it’s less salty by volume. If you’re using regular table salt rather than kosher salt, use only about half as much as our recipe calls for. But in any case, when it comes to salt (and pepper), you should always season to your taste, not ours.
Wine-Braised Beef Pot Roast

Beefeaters  

“Vive la France! The French know how to cook,” said Mrs. Kitchen Riffs, biting into her pot roast. “I’ve got no beef with this dish.” 

“And pot roast goes so well with mashed spuds,” I said. “This meal is no small potatoes.”

“Yup, these mashies really beef up the feast,” said Mrs K R.

“It’s a lot of food,” I said. “We’ll need to burn some calories after this. Can’t be couch potatoes.”

“Agreed,” said Mrs K R. “In fact, based on the size of your serving, you might need an extra workout, Mr Beefcake. Maybe a ten-mile walk.”

“But I’ll have to nap first,” I said. “Otherwise, I might drop like a sack of potatoes during our hike.”

“OK, nap time first,” said Mrs K R. “Wouldn't want to see you turn into ground beef.”

You may also enjoy reading about:
Boeuf Bourguignon
Roast Pork
Red-Braised Beef with Sweet Potatoes
Oven Slow-Cooked BBQ Beef Brisket
Hungarian Beef Paparika Stew
Homemade Spätzle
Or check out the index for more recipes

100 comments:

  1. You made me laugh...a big, honking hunk of meat huh? But I agree and right now I want to devour this, looks fantastic John!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Barb, :-) This really is good stuff -- we don't make it nearly often enough. Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  2. I love adding a splash of wine, it adds such a rich flavor! And thank you for all the tips at the end, very good notes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Mary, wine makes everything better! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  3. A delicious looking pot roast is what makes any banquet a feast... I've made something similar- without the wine of course- this Thanksgiving and it was a hit by all means. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Amira, we sometimes make this using just beef stock. Great no matter how you make it! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  4. Whatever you do, don't send this recipe to my husband! He would be begging it for days.. maybe I can get him to do some chores in return for me making it! ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Pamela, I'd definitely use this recipe as an "incentive" with your husband. Who knows what he can accomplish with the promise of this for dinner? :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  5. of course it had to contain wine!: :D I LOVE IT!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Marcela, you know us too well! :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  6. Dear John,
    I usually don't eat much beef but this dish looks so good. I love the way you call it braised beef. I remember when I would say we are having pot roast, I would get the ughs! from the family, so now I will say Wine Braised Beef. Awesome recipe, I could just have a dish of this right now..Delish! I would serve mine on mashed potato as well, because then the gravy goes on top of the mashies. Yummy!!! Thanks for sharing...Have a great day and rest of the week...
    Dottie :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Dottie, gravy and mashies is such a terrific combo, isn't it? The beef is a bonus. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  7. It looks wonderful and please set a plate for me at the next party. Cooking meat is my weakness in the kitchen funny enough but with a braise in the oven I just might be able to pull this one off. great recipe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Evelyne, braising is my favorite way of preparing meat. Fairly foolproof (just don't allow the braising liquid to boil) and so tasty. Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  8. "Easy down home French cooking" really has my attention! The roast is beautiful and the gravy looks so rich - dinner perfection!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Tricia, this really is down home cooking! And very tasty. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  9. I love pot roast and it's the perfect Sunday night dinner that's sure to satisfy all who eat it. Great recipe and so easy. What could be better?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi VIcki, easy really works for us! This is a favorite of ours. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  10. Yum, this does look good! Anytime is the right time for a pot roast, I never tire of it. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Pat, we never tire of pot roast either. Need to do another one, soon! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  11. Red wine is always a perfect pairing with beef, so including it in the sauce is brilliant! That's a one perfectly cooked and juicy pot roast!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Melanie, the sauce tastes so great because of all that wine! Really good stuff. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  12. Nothing better than low and slow. This looks fabulous.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Karen, yup, low and slow is the way to go. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  13. Hi John , you makes me so hungry , I don't mind because you make it so easy . With company in from everywhere , they love beef or any type of food cooked with wine or bourbon . Brought some top round today , boy what a surprise they will get Friday evening dinner . Thanks John , I am pinning . Nee :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Nee, your top round wants to become this dish. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  14. John, that meat looks so tasty... even on a summer's morning downunder!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lizzy, it was, it was. All gone now. :-( Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  15. I love serving big, honking hunks of meat for company too! haha! :) Thanks for the great tips on braising with wine. This dish looks delicious and I wish I could taste those potatoes with that gravy right now! Yum

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Marcelle, that gravy was so good with the potatoes! Love that combo of flavors. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  16. You had me at pot roast! This is the perfect meal this time of year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Pamela, I never get tired of pot roast in the fall and winter. Such a great cool/cold weather dish! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  17. I'd love to come to your place for a meal like this. A roast makes an easy meal to prepare and it's my favorite thing to do in the winter. I've never called it a big, honking hunk of meat but I will from now on!

    In the summer we sit outside and I rope someone in to flip steaks on the bbq.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Maureen, we'd love to have you! :-) Grilled steaks are great in the summer, aren't they? And this in the winter. Win-win. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  18. WOW! That's so beautiful and flavorful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Kushi, it's a great dish! And very comforting. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  19. My husband loves big honking hunks of meats, I'm going to have to make this for him. Happy Holidays!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Cheri, your husband will thank you! You'll thank you, too. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  20. This sounds delicious. I like that you serve the beef over the mashed potatoes with gravy. This would be a perfect to server for the holidays.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Dawn, mashed potatoes go so well with pot roast, don't you think? And of course you gotta have the gravy! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  21. Pot roast over mashed potatoes would sure make for a happy hubby. And braising in wine makes for a lovely aroma and the kitchen and a darned tasty meal!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Liz, the entire house smells so good when you make this! Really a delightful dish. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  22. Pot roast is a comfort food for me. It was a Sunday dinner my mom would make, and the aroma would fill the kitchen. Happy memories! Thanks for the tip to have the butcher tie the roast together!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Kristi, my mom used to make pot roast a lot when I was a kid, too. Always loved that meal -- still do! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  23. The perfect comfort meal! I don't eat beef anymore but hubby would be all over this. Every now and then I give him a bit of brisket but if he had his way, it would be beef every night. Thanks John!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Abbe, your husband would love this! It's really good stuff. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  24. It's been age since I've made a pot roast and I've never cooked one in wine. Yours looks SO GOOD John! The gravy looks so rich and clear I'd love to soak it up with a piece of bread. :) Looks like it's going to be a cold December but dishes like this will make it feel a lot warmer. Thanks for sharing your recipe!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi MJ, you should definitely try it in wine sometime -- same dish, but totally different flavor. Well, in sauce, at least. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  25. I like the way you think...braised beef does sound so much more fancy-shmancy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Debra, always interesting the difference a name makes, isn't it? :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  26. I LOVEEEEEE these types of roasts, the meat totally melts in your mouth = FRIGGIN' FANTASTIC!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi GIGI, this really is Friggin' Fantastic. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  27. That photo brings me right back to my family dinner table when I was a kid, my mom made a KILLER pot roast, and yours looks like it could give hers a run for its money. I appreciate your detailed notes on this, I have never quite gotten the hang of choosing the right cut of meat for a pot roast, can't wait to give it a try again, thanks John :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sue, it's tougher getting good pot roast meat these days because all meat is more lean, it seems. Which in the case of pot roast really isn't a good thing! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  28. Beef is my absolute favorite and pot roast is great! I had never heard it called pot roast until I met my MIL. Mom had a fit when I called the beef "pot roast." :-) Actually, growing up on a farm, my mother canned beef. It was awesome in mincemeat pies during the holidays.
    And I love leftover pot roast in a sandwich with mustard smeared over it. This post makes me hungry! You did it up perfectly with the veggies and wine, it sounds really delicious! Now I need to buy a pot roast! Thanks for the recipe, John!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Pam, you definitely do need to buy a pot roast. And leftover pot roast sandwich -- mustard is mandatory, you're right -- is such good stuff. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  29. John, this looks delicious! Pot roast was one of my favorite meals of my Mother's. She always called it "Roast Beef" even though it was actually braised. I still love it and cook it fairly often. Your photographs are gorgeous and make me feel a little jealous--my camera is still in the shop. Thanks for another great post, Rocquie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Rocquie, hope you get your camera from the shop soon! This is one of our favorite meat dishes -- so much flavor. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  30. It's a great idea to make this for entertaining. That would take a lot of the pressure off of making an elaborate meal while everyone else is having fun.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Laura, the fact that you can make this ahead (it actually gets better if it sits in the refrigerator for a day or two) is one of the things I most like about this dish. Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  31. I love doing pot roasts when I have dinner guests too! Everyone always seems to love them. Trying this one next time!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Ashley, everyone always does seem to like pot roast, don't they? We sure do! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  32. I like pot toast for entertaining too. I typically look for beef chuck weighing 3 to 5 pounds, which comes from the shoulder of the animal. This cut contains a lot of fatty connective tissue which sounds gross, but when cooked properly, becomes deliciously moist and tender. Now I'm hungry. GREG

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Greg, I go back and forth between bottom round and chuck roast for this dish. Chuck roast has better flavor,IMO. Bottom round makes much nicer slices, and decent flavor (really quite good with the sauce). Probably the best option is bottom round, and then lard it with fat -- but nobody does that these days! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  33. This is true winter comfort food. It may not be fancy, but I dare you to serve it to anyone and not have them swoon. Classic, delicious food like this never goes out of style.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Carolyn, we love classic comforts like this! And you're right -- people do swoon when they're served this. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  34. I'm always reading your posts with a smile on my face, John. You and Mrs. Riffs sure have fun!
    After being a vegetarian for many years, I started eating red meat last year and I'm loving it. I wasn't a potato lover either until I learned how to cook them properly, lol. Your dish is perfection and I wish I was sitting down to that table right now! Save me some?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Robyn, we do have fun! And of course we have some pot roast for you. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  35. What a beautiful, mouthwatering beef pot roast!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Denise, isn't this nice? Yummy stuff. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  36. This is a delicious and comforting cold-weather meal (and mashed potatoes are a definite must!) :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Amy, there are very few dishes that mashed potatoes don't improve. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  37. Your posts always makes me smile. It would nice to meet you both some day.
    TO THIS roast, my little one has been asking to learn how to make beef at home, he is so fond of it. I'm overwhelmed a bit because I've never made it, I need to see your recipe and make it for him sometime. This does look simple too.
    Hope you are enjoying your weekend.
    xoxo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Asha, it'd ge great to meet you, too! And you owe it to your little one to learn to make this. Once you learn the basic of braising, you really know how to do any kind of braise. It's easy! You'll love it. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  38. You can't go wrong with a Julia Child recipe. And your photos are so mouth-watering you've made me very hungry. When we entertain, we often serve up a big hunk of cow as well and like you say, everyone is soon begging for seconds - I always add a few extras to the numbers when telling the butcher how many we have coming for dinner - just to be sure no one is going to be short-changed xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Charlie, gotta add those seconds! People will eat more than they think they will with this sort of dish. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  39. Timing is everything, John. Just moments ago, I loaded up the slow-cooker with a pot roast that had spent the night marinating in a little balsamic vinegar and beef stock, with some herbs and spices tossed in for good measure. This was a recipe on the fly, since I couldn't find nor remember my old recipe. If I weren't so far behind with my blogging duties, I would have seen your post and, well, I think it safe to say I would have chosen a different path for tonight's dinner. Time will tell, as it always does, but I'm pinning your recipe for next time. Thanks for sharing another great one!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi John, the slow-cooker is such a great way to cook pot roast, isn't it? Really like your use of balsamic vinegar -- perfect for this sort of dish. What time is dinner? We'll stop by! :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  40. This looks amazing - what a perfect recipe to try during the holidays! I'll be sure to give it a try.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Beth, this really is such a nice recipe. Who doesn't like pot roast? :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  41. I can't have pot roast and not think of my mother, this was one of her Sunday specialties. She would have certainly enjoyed yours. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Karen, my mom also used to make pot roast many Sundays. With dumplings. :-) I need to do her version one of these days -- it's different from this one. Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  42. Comfort food at it's best. It looks delicious John.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Pam, don't you love dishes like this? So nice! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  43. This is the kind of meal my husband wants! Looks so good!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Peachy, it is good! And I'll bet you'd both enjoy it. :-) Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  44. This will make a delicious filling meal. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lux, it's wonderful stuff! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  45. The post is so amazing! Thank you for sharing:)

    irenethayer.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Irene, it's really a terrific dish. Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  46. John, the sauce (I was going to call it 'gravy' but that's not gourmet enough) looks like it's cooked perfectly. You're like me, after cooking the meat in the veggies for several hours, I can't bear to throw them away- I wind up eating them!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Fran, those cooked veggies aren't "fancy" enough to serve, but they sure are good, aren't they? Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  47. Comfort food! I love pot roast or braised beef...and I also prefer the oven method. You can get with something else while it simmers away.
    This looks fantastic, John.
    You conversation sure had me giggling :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Nazneen, isn't this a great dish? And I so agree on the oven method -- really don't have to watch it. Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  48. I am planning to make this over the weekend, perfect timing for a good recipe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Raymund, don't you just love pot roast? Such good stuff! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  49. I think I got a whiff of the aroma surrounding your pot roast as it braised. I hope so. Pure comfort food - dare I serve it Christmas Eve (35 people and counting - you can see why I don't want to go the tenderloin route). I c'tan have too many pot roast recipes. Will be cooking this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Claudia, 35 people! I wouldn't do tenderloin. :-) This would be perfect! Thanks for the comment.

      Delete
  50. I really want to make this with my pressure cooker. It's going to be a perfect comfort food when we go home. I never thought of browning in the oven - I should give that a try one day, wonder how it is like after browned... curious. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Nami, I've never used a pressure cooker, but it'd be pretty easy to adapt this recipe, I'd think. I usually brown on the stovetop, and braise in the oven, but you can also brown in the oven (under high heat). The browning doesn't add that much flavor to the meat -- but the brown parts that are stuck to the pot have a huge amount of flavor, which is why I add a bit of wine to the pan and scrap them up (Step 5). Thanks for the comment.

      Delete