Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Homemade Whole Wheat Bread

Homemade Whole Wheat Bread

For splendid sandwiches and terrific toast

Is anything better than homemade bread fresh from the oven? The aroma (and flavor!) can be irresistible. And making it is easier than you might think. Hands-on time is only a few minutes—and the flavor payoff is major.

Plus, homemade bread contains no preservatives or additives. So if one of your New Year’s resolutions is to eat healthier, baking your own bread is a great way to start.

But be warned: Once you taste homemade, you’ll never be happy with store-bought loaves again.


Homemade Whole Wheat Bread

Recipe: Homemade Whole-Wheat Bread

You can bake this bread either as a boule or as standard loaves. We prefer the shape of the boule, so that’s what we do; but in the Notes we provide instructions for using loaf pans.

This bread contains both whole-wheat flour and all-purpose white flour. Mrs. Kitchen Riffs is the baker in our household, and she’s experimented with various ratios of whole-wheat/white flour to find one that has good flavor, plus a texture that works well for sandwiches or toast (see Notes for more discussion). She adapted this recipe from several bread recipes she found on the King Arthur Flour web site.

This bread has a fairly tight crumb structure (unlike the looser crumb of our No-Knead Bread). In order to achieve that finer crumb, some kneading is required. That’s a snap if you have a heavy-duty stand mixer with a dough hook. But no worries if you don’t have a stand mixer—it takes only a little longer to knead the dough by hand, and it’s a pleasant and relaxing activity.

Active prep time for this recipe is about 15 minutes. Then the bread needs to rise (twice), about 4 hours total (but see Notes). Baking time adds another 30 to 35 minutes.

This recipe yields 1 large boule, or two 8-inch loaves.

Ingredients
  • ~1½ cups warm water (~100 degrees F; see Notes)
  • 2½ teaspoons instant yeast (see Notes)
  • 2½ tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1½ teaspoons Kosher salt (see Notes)
  • 1 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 3¾ cups all-purpose flour (we prefer unbleached)
  • ~1 tablespoon butter, divided (for buttering the containers used for rising and baking)
Procedure
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a medium-sized mixing bowl, if making by hand), stir together the warm water and instant yeast. Allow the yeast to dissolve while you assemble the remaining ingredients, stirring the mixture with a spatula a few times to help it along. 
  2. Stir in the olive oil and salt. Then attach the dough hook (if using a stand mixer) and add the flours. Stir the mixture with a spatula if necessary to combine the ingredients. Knead at low speed for about 5 minutes, stopping to scrape the bottom and sides of the bowl if necessary (or knead by hand if not using a mixer; you may have to knead a couple minutes longer if you do it by hand). If the dough is too dry (or all the flour is not being absorbed), dribble in more warm water. If the dough is too wet to form into a manageable mass, add more flour, a teaspoon at a time. Knead the dough until it becomes smooth and springy (if you’re using a stand mixer, the dough will tend to form a mass on the dough hook—that’s when you know it’s adequately kneaded).
  3. Transfer the dough to a buttered container (we use a 2-quart Pyrex container with measurement markings on the side so we can see how much the dough is rising). Cover the container with plastic wrap and let the dough rise in a warmish location until it doubles in volume (about 1 to 2 hours; see Notes).
  4. Remove the dough from the container. Pull the dough into a longish strand to deflate it, then form the dough into an oblong boule. Place the dough in a buttered baking pan (we use a small Dutch oven that holds about 3 quarts). Cover the baking pan with plastic wrap and let the dough rise for another 1 to 2 hours, until it's almost doubled in size. See Notes for alternative baking pans.
  5. Preheat the oven to 450°F. Remove the plastic wrap from the baking pan(s). Bake the bread for 30 to 35 minutes, until the interior temperature reaches 190 to 200 degrees F and the top is golden brown. (Tent the bread with aluminum foil after 20 minutes if it seems to be browning too quickly.)
  6. Remove the bread from the oven, and cool it on a wire rack.
Homemade Whole Wheat Bread

Notes
  • Make sure the water you use for this recipe isn’t too hot—yeast cells start dying at about 130 degrees F.
  • If you’re not familiar with instant yeast, you may assume it’s somehow inferior to active dry yeast (the other variety you’re most likely to find on your grocer’s shelves). In fact, however, instant yeast tends to be preferable, at least in our experience. Both forms of yeast are produced in quantity by industrial processes, so neither one is “natural.” But instant yeast is air dried (unlike active dry yeast, which is dried in ovens), so more yeast cells survive the production process.
  • Active dry yeast needs to be rehydrated before use, while instant yeast does not—it can simply be mixed with other ingredients. So if you’re using instant yeast, you can skip Step 1 of this recipe and just combine the water and yeast with the other ingredients in Step 2. We specify Step 1 because we store our instant yeast in the freezer. When frozen, yeast cells go into suspended animation, so we like to let them wake up and stretch a bit in warm water while we’re getting the other ingredients together. In truth, though, our instant yeast works fine right out of the deep freeze.
  • In addition to instant and active dry yeast, you may see fresh compressed or “cake” yeast for sale (though few markets in the US carry it these days because it’s highly perishable). If you use compressed yeast in this recipe, double the quantity to 2 tablespoons.  
  • We buy instant yeast in one-pound containers, then store it in the freezer in a sealed glass container. It keeps well for at least a year, if not longer. And it’s a lot cheaper than those little packets.
  • We’re partial to the SAF brand of instant yeast, but other brands should work fine too.
  • Like many recipes labeled “whole wheat,” this one includes a large percentage of all-purpose (white) flour. Feel free to increase the percentage of whole-wheat flour if you want a heartier loaf. If you go that route, however, make sure to increase the amount of water you add to the dough, because whole-wheat flour soaks up water more readily than the refined white variety. If you increase the whole-wheat flour percentage, but not the water, you may end up with a loaf that is dry—and heavy as a door stop.
  • How much extra water should you use? We would suggest starting with an extra ½ cup of water for each additional ½ cup of whole-wheat flour. Aim for a dough that seems wet and sticky when you put it in the rising container (the water will get absorbed quickly).
  • How much additional whole-wheat flour should you use? That’s up to you. If you’re not accustomed to “rustic” loaves, you may want to start by increasing the whole-wheat flour to 1½ cups (decreasing the white flour by roughly the same amount).
  • You can go all the way to 100% whole-wheat flour if you want. But be forewarned: The bread will not be “fluffy,” and some people may find the taste bitter (others will just call it “nutty”).
  • So why does the 100% whole-wheat bread you buy at the supermarket generally look (and taste) like slightly roughed-up white bread? Because commercial bakeries incorporate lots of additives into their loaves, including preservatives, stabilizers, softeners, and sweeteners. They also often start with refined grains, and then just add back some bran and wheat germ (yes, really).
  • The rising times specified in this recipe are approximate. A warmer room means faster yeast activity, and thus a speedier rise.
  • If your dough is rising too slowly, you can place it under an electric blanket (turned to a low setting) to speed things up.
  • If the dough is rising too quickly, you can slow things down by stashing it in the refrigerator (even overnight).
  • You may need to allow for a longer rising time if you use a higher percentage of whole-wheat flour than specified in the recipe.
  • If you’d prefer more standard-looking bread loaves, just divide the dough in half in Step 4 and place the two halves in buttered 8x4-inch loaf pans. If you go this route, you’ll probably also need to reduce the baking time in Step 5; check the interior temperature of the loaves after about 25 minutes.
  • You could also use 9x5-inch loaf pans, though the loaves might be a bit too small to fill the pans.
  • Kosher salt is more coarse than regular table salt; so it’s less salty by volume. If you’re using regular table salt instead of Kosher, reduce the amount by about half.
  • An instant-read thermometer is perfect for checking the internal temperature of almost anything you bake or cook. We consider ours a “must have.”
  • The crust on this bread is not brittle and crunchy (so it’s not like French bread). But it’s also not remotely as soft as supermarket bread.
  • This bread works fine in sandwiches or for toast. If you make it in the form of a boule, you can also cut wedges of bread and serve them at a dinner party.
  • Slicing this bread is easiest with a serrated bread knife or an electric knife.
  • Because there’s not much fat in this bread, it will begin to stale within about 24 hours. We usually cut the boule in half (or thirds) and freeze what we won’t be using immediately.
Homemade Whole Wheat Bread

Bread and Circuses

“This is so good,” I said, slathering Homemade Butter on a piece of whole-wheat toast. “So glad we’re making all our own bread these days.”

“As I recall, we started a couple years back with No-Knead Homemade Bread,” said Mrs. Kitchen Riffs, scooping jam onto her slice.

“That recipe is terrific!” I said, munching. “Best thing since, well, sliced bread.”

“Then I developed our Soft and Buttery Dinner Rolls,” said Mrs K R.

“That’s become one of our, shall we say, bread-and-butter recipes when entertaining,” I added.

“Along the way, I started making Irish Soda Bread,” said Mrs K R. “Not to mention our quick and fun Beer Bread.”

“You’ve even made our own hamburger buns,” I said. “Though we haven’t shared that recipe yet.”

“We need to post it one of these days,” said Mrs K R.

“Indeed, especially since it’s delicious,” I said. “Just like all your other bread recipes.”

“Thanks,” said Mrs K R, smiling. “Flattery works with bakers, you know. Like yeast for the soul, it makes our spirits rise.”

And I know which side my bread is buttered on.

You may also enjoy reading about:
No Knead Bread
Soft and Buttery Dinner Rolls
Baking Powder Biscuits
Beer Bread
Homemade Butter
Irish Soda Bread
Skillet JalapeƱo Cornbread
Or check out the index for more

110 comments:

Alex said...

Baking bread has been one of my recent addictions. Winter is so much tastier. :) Thanks for the recipe: love trying new ones!

~ Nee ~ said...

Hi John, I can almost taste the bread so beautiful . I remember the rolls , I made them shaped like buns , good ,oh yes . Tell Mrs. KR , I wish I lived closer , the aroma is enough alone to make you hungry . Thanks for sharing and have a great week . :) Nee

Pat said...

That looks wonderful! :) I love homemade bread and have spent much time in the past days kneading it, no bread making machines in the '70's. The heel, hot and slathered with butter was my downfall. Yum!

Shibi Thomas said...

You are absolutely right, once you taste Homemade bread it is hard to go for store bought ones. I loved the homemade butter too. Is the jam homemade too? Is that an orange jam or peach jam? Looks really good on that slice of bread.

Karen Harris said...

Nothing like freshly baked bread, except maybe, freshly baked bread slathered with butter and jam. All the sudden I'm craving toast. Great recipe.

thelady8home said...

'yeast for our soul, makes our spirits rise' - what a beautiful line. This fresh piece of loaf lifted my spirits too. Nothing beats the aroma of a freshly baked bread. So totally yumm!

GiGi Eats Celebrities said...

I still need to make some bread... But a GiGi Approved bread... So it's a bit more tricky! lol!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Alex, winter is definitely tastier with homemade bread! Good line. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Nee, Mrs K R is baking more bread today. We love this stuff! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Pat, kneading bread by hand is rather pleasant, isn't it? Much easier to use a stand mixer, though. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Shibi, that's store-bought jam. Apricot. We like its flavor, and its color just works with bread pictures IMO. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Karen, I had toast for breakfast. ;-) And this really is a nice recipe. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Minnie, that line is all Mrs K R. And the aroma of freshly baked bread is so wonderful, isn't it? Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi GiGi, I'd love to see what bread you'd bake! And, of course, the video that'd accompany your post. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Holly | Beyond kimchee said...

There is nothing like a loaf of homemade bread. I would love to bit on the toast with the delicious jam!

Asha Shivakumar said...

Nope. Nothing is better than home made fresh bread. Only downside is, it lasts a whole 30 minutes or less;). Love it.

Denise Browning@From Brazil To You said...

I gotta make this. My husband loves homemade bread -- although I confess it is something that I don't make often because it's time demanding. But this whole wheat bread is the real stuff.

Sage Trifle said...

I haven't made bread in way too long. Why? The weather is perfect for it. Thanks for the inspiration. --Rocquie

mjskit said...

What a beautiful loaf of bread! I can smell it through the computer screen. When I got back into bread baking a couple of years, I literally quit buying bread. Even "good" store bought bread can't beat homemade. Your beer bread is on my short list of breads to try out, but this WW bread is very tempting as well.

Judy @Savoring Today said...

I am convinced that heaven will smell like basil and warm baked bread. You are right, it is so much better made at home ~ your loaf looks amazing and I love the reflection of the bread in the knife. :)

Lizzy (Good Things) said...

Oh I love that "Like yeast for the soul, it makes our spirits rise.” Just wonderful, like your bread. Yum!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Holly, isn't homemade bread the best? And this is wonderful! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Asha, yours lasts 30 minutes? :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Denise, you do have to make this -- and it's really easy, particularly once you've made it a time or two. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Rocquie, cold weather is bread weather, isn't it? Soup, too. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi MJ, I really don't remember the last time we bought bread--Mrs K R's is so much better. We make all kinds, but this one is our daily loaf. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Lizzy, that Mrs K R has a way with words, doesn't she? :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Judy, sound like heaven to me. :-) I kinda like that reflection too! Was fun to set up. :-) Thanks for the comment.

~~louise~~ said...

Mrs. K.R. most definitely has a way with words, John..I think that line should be stamped on a tee shirt:)

As for that bread, oh so heavenly:) I don't usually make resolutions but if I did, baking bread at least once a month would be on my list.

I do have a stash of bread recipes I would like to try. I'll be adding this one especially since it is actually posted in a way I can comprehend:)

Thanks so much for sharing, John...Please thank Mrs. K.R. for her words of wisdom too:)

Mary Frances said...

I don't make bread very often but when I do (usually around Thanksgiving) it makes the whole house smell amazing!

Cheri Savory Spoon said...

Hi John, you and Mrs. K.R. make baking bread look easy. The loaf looks delicious!

Maureen | Orgasmic Chef said...

I can't bear to smell bread baking without having some with a bit of butter or jam. Your bread is so pretty!!

Food Gal said...

It's true -- bread making at home may take a bit of time, but the end result is so worth it. Plus that fragrance of bread baking in the oven just fills the house. One whiff and you can't help but smile.

Adri said...

Well now, doesn't this sound great! I love home baked bread. That is one handsome loaf, my friend, and I love that you incorporated some olive oil. Bravo!

Dottie said...

Hi John,
Sorry that my comment is so late, but trying to catch up on things...and you know the old story, "better late than never." Well, now what a delicious post this one is. I love to bake and of course eat fresh homemade bread. Your looks amazing! I love the shape of the boule instead of the loaves. I really enjoyed your post, as you always have such fabulous information. I can relate to all of your research. I have made bread before, even beer bread for St. Patty's Day. So I know about kneading. I have never used a machine, I guess I am just an old fashioned gal. Also love the fact that you use the unbleached, I do all the time. Boy your house must have been smelling really good, with bread baking...Thanks for your sharing this awesome post. Have to try your recipe...Have a wonderful rest of the week...
Dottie :)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Louise, that saying would make a great T-Shirt, wouldn't it? :-) Once you get into it, baking bread isn't all that hard. A bit of work, yes, but really not difficult. And with a bit of practice, it's second nature. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Mary Frances, the aroma of bread does an amazing job filling an entire house, doesn't it? We like to bread to make our Thanksgiving stuffing -- works really well. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Cheri, bread baking really is easy! You do have to pay attention the first time or two, but it really becomes routine. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Maureen, this bread certainly wouldn't have escaped John's knife! It's really good freshly baked, isn't it? Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Carolyn, yup fresh bread = smiles. At least in our house. And it sounds like yours. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Adri, the olive oil really adds a bit of flavor to this loaf. Plus some richness, of course. Really works well! Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Dottie, it's always a please to read your posts! Don't worry about when you get time to do it -- we're all so busy. Mrs K R made bread again today, so our house was smelling really good again. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

nagi@RecipeTin Eats said...

Look at the crust on that bread! And how well it toasts! The breadth of your talents continue to amaze me. From fall apart meats with SERIOUS flavours to breads. YUM! :)

Marcela said...

I love homemade breads! They're much healthier and tastier than ones I can find in grocery stores. I'm totally gonna give your recipe a try!

Peachy @ The Peach Kitchen said...

Why buy one when you can make one at home, right? Thanks for sharing your recipe, John!

Amira said...

Finally, you've promised me this recipe almost a year ago if I remember well :). I was going to ask you about it and nagging you again.. I've tried your rolls before and they are a so delicious, I am now eager to try this recipe. Thanks.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Nagi, this really is good everyday bread -- and it makes exceptional toast. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Marcela, once you start making your own bread, you'll never look back. It's seriously good stuff. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Peachy, that's our motto! We do like to make our own things -- they just taste better. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Amira, sorry it took so long! We've always had something else ahead of it on the schedule -- but decided the bread had waited long enough, so bumped some stuff. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Carol at Wild Goose Tea said...

I love the last comment by your wife about flattery. It's important to make people's spirits rise. I know there was a pun intended, but I love the beauty of the statement. Who doesn't like fresh bread slathered with butter. YUM.

Beth said...

To answer your first question, no, there is nothing better than fresh, homemade bread. You're making me long to bake a loaf right now! Homemade whole wheat bread is absolutely perfect.

Laura Dembowski said...

I love homemade bread! This loaf looks glorious!

Pam said...

No, there's definitely nothing better than your own bread straight the oven and you did yours perfectly. I've never made WW bread and want to give it a go. Thanks for the recipe!
Good flattery quote!!
















Rosemary Wolbert said...

The art of bread baking escapes me; I stand in near reverential awe of those for whom it's easy. I think I need to stand beside someone while they perform the magic. Better yet, use my equipment in my kitchen. I'm still game to try, though. Your beautiful bread is inspiration.

Ansh said...

There is nothing better than a home made bread. Once you make your own bread, you won't buy the commercially made one.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Carol, fresh bread -- and flattery -- both take well to butter (or buttering up). ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Beth, we love freshly baked bread! Great aroma, better flavor. Just good stuff. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Laura, it is rather glorious, isn't it? :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Pam, we love bread right out of the oven. Whole wheat bread has a lot of flavor -- definitely worth a try. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Rosemary, making bread is actually easy. Just try it -- even if you mess up your first time (and you won't be perfect), after a few times you'll be spot on. It's one of those baking skills where a bit of practice helps a lot. Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Ansh, there really is no going back to store bought once you begin baking bread. Such good stuff! Thanks for the comment.

Hotly Spiced said...

There is something so comforting about homemade bread baking in the oven. I do love the look of your loaf, especially the image where it looks like it's cooling on the bench xx

Bam's Kitchen said...

Beautiful loaf! You are right I should starting making my own. I love how delicious it makes your whole house smell. I don't even want to think about what they may be adding to the bread where I live... Asia has a weird concept that they think light and fluffy sweet bread is the best and after consuming enough taste samples I can tell you, it is not. I really crave hearty wheat breads like you have made. Have a super weekend!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Charlie, homemade bread is the best, isn't it? Only problem is it's too easy to eat too much of the stuff! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Bam, it's actually rather disturbing when you look at the list of ingredients on standard supermarket bread. One's own bread is so good, and doesn't take that much active time. Just let it rise and do its own thing. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Anonymous said...

Wow...this beautiful loaf looks so well raised...nothing beats the joy of baking ones own bread...the result is beyond delicious...and any work with dough is always so relaxing...this recipe is new to us so we are all excited to try this out for the weekend...thanks so much :-)

Lily Lau said...

Thank you for this idea, I'd love to start preparing all this basic food on my own, so today is the day! :)

mymansbelly said...

Mmmmmm....homemade bread. I swear I can smell it right through the screen of my computer. Can you tell I like homemade bread? ;)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Kumar, you're so right that baking bread is extremely satisfying. Not to mention tasty. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Lily, you'll have a fun day! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Pamela, the aroma is so enticing, isn't it? And homemade bread is the best! ;-) Thanks for your comment.

Shashi Charles said...

You are indeed right - there's no bread like homemade bread - the smell, the taste, the lack of preservatives - ahh...just so good! And y'all have quite a bread collection! Cannot wait to see y'alls hamburger buns!

Chris Scheuer said...

There's nothing better than the aroma of baking bread. This looks great for toast, sandwiches, paninis..... yum!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Shashi, we'll be doing hamburger buns one of these days. Which -- knowing how many other things we want to do -- could mean a year! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Chris, isn't it the truth? Freshly baked bread is ambrosia, scent-wise. :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kiran @ KiranTarun.com said...

LOVE homemade whole wheat bread! Yum :)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Kiran, good stuff, isn't it? :-) Thanks for the comment.

Amy (Savory Moments) said...

There's not much better than homemade bread that's still warm slathered in some butter and/or jam! This looks quite delicious!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Amy, totally agree! Can't get enough of the stuff. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Sippity Sup said...

I have to say. Sometimes I get to the bottom of all these comments and I forget what I was going to say! Too popular for your own good. XOGREG

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Greg, well, you could always go back and reread the post to bring it back. :D Nope, I wouldn't either! Thanks for the comment.

Gourmet Getaways said...

Thanks for the caveat, John! We love home made food just as you do! This bread smells good!

Julie & Alesah
Gourmet Getaways xx

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Julie & Alesah, the aroma of this really is irresistible. So of course, I don't resist! Thanks for the comment.

dedy oktavianus said...

Simply damn delicious and awesome bread !!!
Dedy@Dentist Chef

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Dedy, it really is awesome bread! Thanks for the comment.

Paula @ Vintage Kitchen Notes said...

Few things beat the smell ofmfreshly baked bread! It looks amazing!

motherrimmy said...

Your bread brings back very pleasant memories. When I was raising my kids, I'd make my own bread. I loved the process of kneading and baking. The aroma was incredible, and the kids loved to help. You've inspired me to pick it up again. Delicious!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Paula, this really is a nice loaf of bread -- super flavor. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Kristi, you really do need to bake your own bread -- super flavor, and much better for you than the supermarket stuff. Only problem is you'll be tempted to eat more of it! Thanks for the comment.

Honey said...

This looks crazy good.. like real bread too. I could imagine how this would be 10 times more amazing than store bought whole wheat bread. :-)

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Honey, it is crazy good. And far, far better than that store stuff. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Zoe said...

Hi John,

I must say... Nothing beat homemade!!! Your homemade whole wheat bread looks so fresh and I bet that it must be smelling really good too.

Zoe

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Zoe, we love homemade bread! And this is a particularly nice recipe -- loads of flavor. And aroma. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Helene Dsouza said...

I like to knead bread dough when I am stressed out, the exercise releases the tensions. :)
People frequently make homemade bread back in Austria, I am still a bit behind with my baking. It's just that have been struggling a lots with the flour here, it's just not the same quality in India. When I bake a bread in Europe. it always comes out great. Your bread John looks magnificent and I would happily top a slice every morning with homemade jam or honey.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Helene, we love jam on homemade bread! And butter. And, well, basically everything. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Caroline Taylor said...

Lovely classic loaf, bet it smelled amazing as it was baking!

Nazneen Hamilton said...

The bread looks fantastic John! There really is nothing like homemade bread, from the aroma to the taste and texture. Is that marmalade I see? I just made my first batch of Seville mamalade. Haven't tasted it yet, I guess I was waiting for this bread recipe.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Caroline, this is wonderful bread -- so tasty. Mrs KR baked another loaf today! :-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Nazneen, I'll bet your Seville marmalade would be wonderful on this. ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Simones Kitchen said...

This looks fantastic John! Bread and I seem to always have a love hate relationship when it comes to making my own. I love doing it but I am certainly not the best bread maker in the world!

Anonymous said...

Home made bread certainly rocks! I just posted an old favourite recipe that my husband makes for no knead bread coincidentally. Adding the whole wheat component is a great idea, my hubby did that with his no knead version and it was great. Homemade butter slathered on a thick slice of homemade bread is the ultimate comfort food. I love that you baked it in a boule too, so rustic.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Simone, we bake bread at least once a week. It's one of those skills that you really pick up the more you do it. And it's so worth doing! ;-) Thanks for the comment.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Eva, we do a no-knead version of whole wheat bread too -- it's great when you want a crusty, rustic loaf! We like a kneaded bread better when sandwiches are one of the uses for the bread, however. But it's great to have both kinds on hand at the same time, isn't it? Love to have choices! Thanks for the comment.

Nami | Just One Cookbook said...

Hello Mrs. KR! Beautiful bread! I wish I have a slice of this bread right out of the oven! John is a lucky guy. :) I need to learn more baking from you!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Nami, I am indeed lucky! Mrs KR makes really good bread. And this is a wonderful recipe -- definitely something I think you'd enjoy. Thanks for the comment.

Juliana said...

I am totally with you, nothing better than home baked bread...and I have been baking like a mad person lately...I love that you used whole wheat, the bread sure look great, nice crumb.
Thanks for the recipe!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Juliana, this really is great bread -- excellent for sandwiches and toast, and really full of flavor. Good stuff! Thanks for the comment.

Barb | Creative Culinary said...

My favorite bread is a combination of white and wheat with a little bit of honey and I'm wondering now why don't I bake bread more often? I know it's timely but I work from home so I have no excuse do I? It's cold, it's snowy, it's time for bread. Thanks for a great recipe!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Hi Barb, making your own bread takes almost no time. Really, mixing it up is maybe 15 minutes. You do need to let it rise and turn it into a pan, and let it rise again. But you're at home, so that will be no bother. It's really worth doing! Thanks for the comment.